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What one journalist, and former KBIA reporter, witnessed other reporters do in Ferguson, Mo. led him to stop filing stories. Al Jazeera freelancer Ryan Schuessler wrote a personal blog post detailing the disrespectful actions he saw and why he decided to leave (for now). Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Courtesy Columbia Daily Tribune

When the Columbia Daily Tribune published an editorial cartoon about looting in Ferguson, Managing Editor Jim Robertson said the intent was to be provocative. What some readers saw was racism. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

An editorial cartoon in the Columbia Daily Tribune sparks cries of racism from readers, the Huffington Post names a new “Ferguson Fellow” to spend a year looking into how the St. Louis County police department got its military-grade equipment, and a young journalist speaks out on why it’s time step out of Ferguson and let the region heal.  Also, how Facebook comments led a cops reporter to quit and a police chief to lose his job, why CNN will soon be doing less with less and ESPN’s reporting on Michael Sam’s shower habits. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News. 

Courtesy Columbia Daily Tribune

This editorial cartoon, published in the August 20, 2014 edition of the Columbia Daily Tribune drew cries of racism from readers who worry the imagery paints Missouri as a "racist and backwater region."

Managing Editor Jim Robertson said he thought it was provocative, but its intent was not racism.

Cherie Cullen / Department of Defense

The rumors swirled for much of last week, after an exclusive Politico report, that David Gregory was out at Meet the Press. NBC made it official on Thursday. Chuck Todd will take over as moderator of the program on September 7. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss. 

freejamesfoley.org

The militant Jihadist group ISIS released video of the beheading of journalist James Foley in retaliation, it says, for the U.S. air strikes in Iraq. Foley went missing on Thanksgiving day, 2012, in Syria. In the video Foley is kneeling against a desert landscape, wearing something resembling an orange prison jump suit.  ISIS is threatening to kill another journalist they are holding if air strikes do not stop. Has the role journalists play in war zones changed? Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry, and Amy Simons discuss. 

More than a ten journalists have been arrested, dozens more tear gassed trying to cover the violence in Ferguson, Missouri.  Governor Jay Nixon lost control of a nationally televised news conference, and cable news anchors turn into advocates on-screen.  What role is the media playing in the continuing conflict? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Austin Federa / KBIA

So much has happened in Ferguson, Missouri.  Nearly a dozen reporters have been arrested while on the job.  We've learned the identity of Michael Brown's shooter: six-year police veteran Darren Wilson. St. Louis NBC-affiliate KSDK-TV aired video of his home.  Governor Jay Nixon instituted -- and lifted -- curfews and called in the Missouri National Guard.

And we saw it all live -- online, on air and in print.

Strange theories abound following the shootdown of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17. What impact is that having on the people of Russia? Rupert Murdoch makes a bid for Time Warner. What does that mean for the future of corporate media? And Jill Abramson has been making the rounds, speaking with several prominent women journalists, but have they been going easy on her? Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Judd Slivka and Stacey Woelfel discuss these issues and more on this edition of Views of the News.

C-SPAN

  Last week there was lots of talk about a hearing in which Dr. Mehmet Oz met his match in U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.). She's the chair of the Consumer Protection Committee.  Oz went before the committee to testify on the marketing of "miracle" weight loss cures. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Flink, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

thierry ehrmann / Flickr

  Journalists around the globe are decrying an Egyptian court's decision to imprison three Al Jazeera English journalists on charges of making false news reports and aiding terrorists. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Flink, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

jasonwhat / Flickr

Bigger than baseball?

With ratings for Sunday's U.S.A-Portugal game tipping in at just more than 24 million television viewers, it's probably safe to say World Cup fever has swept the nation.  ESPN reports more than 18 million tuned in to its main, English-language broadcast -- an audience bigger than single games of both the World Series and the NBA finals.

A big week in legal news, as the U.S. Supreme Court decides on the Aereo case, verdicts are announced in the News of the World phone-hacking scandal and three Al Jazeera journalists are sentenced to more than seven years in an Egyptian prison. Also, Sen. Claire McCaskill takes on Dr. Oz, the St. Louis-Post Dispatch drops George Will, and hottest felon ever? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Jim Flink: Views of the News.

via Jeff Weisbien

The Supreme Court of the United States found in favor of major broadcasters, and against Aereo, in a case over the streaming of copyrighted material on the Internet.

Jordan Crook, Tech Crunch: "Aereo loses in Supreme Court, deemed illegal"

Katy Bachman, POLITICO: "Aereo loses copyright fight at Supreme Court"

  As the violence escalates in Iraq at the hands of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), there's a steady stream of hawkish pundits on television talking about the need to act.  What do Paul Wolfowitz, Paul Bremer, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) have to say today that's different than prior to the 2003 invasion of Iraq? Missouri School of Journalism professors Margaret Duffy, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

New York Times/TBrand

  The New York Times has launched a multimedia report -- complete with video, audio and interactive graphics -- on what life is like for women in our federal prison system.  It is native advertising, paid for by Netflix, as a promotion for its hit series, Orange is the New Black. Missouri School of Journalism professors Margaret Duffy, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

As the violence escalates in Iraq, there’s a steady stream of hawkish pundits on television talking about the need to act. What do Wolfowitz, Bremer, McCain and Graham have to say today that’s different than before the 2003 invasion of Iraq? Also, Eric Cantor’s primary defeat catches the national press off guard, another CNN documentary raises questions about transparency and authenticity, and Chelsea Clinton’s $600,000 paycheck. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Margaret Duffy: Views of the News.

As the violence escalates in Iraq at the hands of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), there's a steady stream of hawkish pundits on television talking about the need to act.  What to Paul Wolfowitz, Paul Bremer, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) have to say today that's different than prior to the 2003 invasion of Iraq?

Jack Mirkinson, Huffington Post: “Iraq hawks are still dominating the media debate

jajah / Flickr

  The folks at the online dating site eHarmony have some advice for people looking for Mr. or Ms. Right -- journalists make great life partners! Missouri School of Journalism professors Katherine Reed, Mike McKean and Amy Simons talk about the positives and negatives of dating a journalist.

Keith Allison / Flickr

Did George Will go too far, writing in his Washington Post column that being a sexual assault victim has become a "coveted status" on college campuses? Missouri School of Journalism professors Katherine Reed, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Did George Will go too far, writing in his Washington Post column that being a sexual assault victim has become a “coveted status” on college campuses? Also, American Express commissions Tyler Perry for its latest commercial produced in the style of a documentary film, Time Inc.’s risky split from Time Warner, and why e-Harmony says reporters make good dates. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Katherine Reed: Views of the News.

Flickr user Keith Allison

In a column published in the Friday, June 6 editions of the Washington Post, George F. Will wrote about what he considers a spread of progressivism at American colleges and universities. 

He drew the ire of many when he wrote of what he calls the "supposed campus epidemic of rape, a.k.a. sexual assault."  He attributes the number of reported to increased political correctness on campuses, and that when "making victimhood a coveted status that confers privileges, victims proliferate."

Many news organizations ran Eliott Rodger's YouTube video as part of their coverage of the Isla Vista shootings. How is that different than publishing a suicide note? Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Jim Flink and Amy Simons discuss the national and local media's response. 

The tales of two papers: how one student newspaper on the campus of University of California – Santa Barbara covered a mass shooting while the other chose to ignore it. Also, NBC’s sit down with Edward Snowden, dangerous conditions for reporters in Ukraine, CNN anchors moving to New York, and avoiding conflicts of interest – real and perceived. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Jim Flink: Views of the News.

  

Why was Jill Abramson fired as executive editor the New York Times? Her story doesn’t mesh with that of Publisher Arthur Sulzberger. Was it over a pay dispute as she claims or about a management style Sulzberger says didn’t fit the newsroom? And, why does it even matter? Also, a covering executions in Missouri, the on again-off again OWN documentary on Michael Sam’s quest to make the St. Louis Rams and Michael Jackson’s hologram performance on the Billboard Music Awards. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Jim Flink: Views of the News.

via Wikimedia user Haxorjoe

Watch this week's full program  

Why was Jill Abramson fired as executive editor the New York Times? Her story doesn’t mesh with that of Publisher Arthur Sulzberger. Was it over a pay dispute as she claims or about a management style Sulzberger says didn’t fit the newsroom?

Ken Auletta, New Yorker: “Why Jill Abramson was fired

Courtesy ESPN/NFL Films

Michael Sam made history, becoming the first openly gay football player to be drafted into the NFL.  Saturday, the St. Louis Rams used their seventh round pick to take Sam, giving him a chance to make the team later this summer.

ESPN has a crew with Sam while he watched the draft and awaited word of his future.  And, when the call came from Rams head coach Jeff Fisher, the network decided to air Sam's emotional response in its entirety, live on on television.

Monica Lewinsky is breaking her silence, writing in Vanity Fair that it’s time to “burn the beret and blue dress.” After 17 years, why did she choose to speak out now about her affair with President Bill Clinton?  Also, journalists rubbing elbows with politicians at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, how local, national and international coverage varied during last week’s controversial execution in Oklahoma, and coverage of the kidnapped Nigerian girls. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.


On Thursday, May 8, the new issue of Vanity Fair will hit newsstands.  Inside, there will be an item penned by former White House intern Monica Lewinsky.  After 17 years, she's breaking her silence and talking about her affair with President Bill Clinton and what her life has been like since it became public.

Vanity Fair: “Exclusive: Monica Lewinsky writes about her affair with President Clinton

Clippers owner Donald Sterling, banned from basketball for life for making racist comments.  How did TMZ get the scoop that rocked professional sports?  E-mails between producers of ‘Chicagoland’ and Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s office show some storylines on the CNN docu-series may have been staged. Also, Indy Star’s #ShowUsYourGuns and a look back at NPR’s first foray on the internet. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

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