minimum wage

Missouri’s minimum wage will go up 15 cents as of New Year’s Day.

The increase from the current $7.50 to $7.65 is the result of a 2006 ballot referendum tying the state’s minimum wage to the Midwest Consumer Price Index. It’s the second 15 cent increase in as many years.

New data released by the Department of Labor shows that raising the minimum wage in some states does not appear to have had a negative impact on job growth, contrary to what critics said would happen.

In a report on Friday, the 13 states that raised their minimum wages on Jan. 1 have added jobs at a faster pace than those that did not. The data run counter to a Congressional Budget Office report in February that said raising the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour, as the White House supports, could cost as many as 500,000 jobs.

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File Photo / Flickr

A state Senate committee has advanced legislation that could raise Missouri's minimum wage to $10 an hour.

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File Photo / Flickr

Wages will rise for Missouri's low-income workers and taxes will fall for some corporations when the new year arrives.

Missouri's minimum wage will increase for about 100,000 workers from $7.35 an hour to $7.50. The increase is a result of an annual inflationary adjustment included in a law passed by voters in 2006.

The state's corporate franchise tax rate also will ratchet down in 2014. That's the result of a 2011 law passed by legislators that gradually phases out the franchise tax by 2016.

Fast- Food workers protest for higher wages

Dec 6, 2013
Caitlyn Gallip / KBIA

Protestors took the sidewalk on Thursday demanding higher wages and the ability to form a union for the 2300 Fast-food workers in Columbia.

In more than 100 cities across the country, protests brought together various industry workers asking for a higher, more livable wage and the ability to form unions.

Passersby honk as a group of protestors chant "We cannot survive on $7.35" in front of the Burger King on Business Loop-70 in Columbia. Standing in 20 degree weather, the protestors demand higher wages and the ability to form a union.

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401K / Flickr

Missouri's minimum wage will rise by 15 cents an hour in January.

Kellie Kotraba, Columbia Faith & Values / KBIA

"Can't survive on $7.35  -- can't survive on $7.35." 

Losia Nyankale, 29, didn't mean to make a career in the restaurant business. But after Nyankale was in college for two years, her mom lost her job as a schoolteacher and could no longer pay tuition. Then, Nyankale's temp jobs in bookkeeping dried up in the recession. So she went back to her standby — restaurant work.

"I did some kitchen work. The pantries or the salad station," she says. "I've also managed, supervised, wash[ed] dishes."

The minimum wage in Missouri increased 10 cents to $7.35 cents to start the New Year.

That may go up in the near future.

In the State of the Union address, President Barack Obama said he wants to raise the minimum wage to $9 an hour.

“Today, a full-time worker making the minimum wage earns $14,500 a year. Even with the tax relief we've put in place, a family with two kids that earns the minimum wage still lives below the poverty line. That's wrong,” Obama said.

stopnlook / FLICKR

Missouri's minimum wage will rise by a dime to $7.35 an hour in 2013.

For the past several years, Missouri has followed the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. That's because the federal rate was equal to or greater than the state's minimum, which is adjusted annually based on the cost of living.

But inflation has now pushed Missouri's minimum wage above the federal standard. The new wage is posted on the website of the state labor department.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Two groups that had been pushing to get initiatives stiffening regulations on payday loans and raising Missouri's minimum wage are giving up their fight to get the measures on the November ballot.

Missouri voters will be asked in November to raise the state's tobacco tax and let St. Louis run its own police department.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Initiatives that would cap payday loan interest rates, raise the Missouri minimum wage, and raise the state's tobacco tax are a step closer to the November ballot, after a Missouri Supreme Court ruling yesterday. The three initiatives were tied up for months in court – one judge struck down the payday petition, ruling the ballot summary was "likely to deceive petition signers." But yesterday, the Missouri Supreme Court upheld all three ballot summaries.

jonathunder / Wikimedia Commons

The authority of the Missouri auditor to write financial estimates for ballot initiatives is under scrutiny by the state Supreme Court.

The high court heard arguments Monday on whether a law directing the auditor to prepare the financial estimates exceeds the limits of the auditor's authority spelled out in the Missouri Constitution.

Newscast for May 7, 2012

May 7, 2012

Regional news coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

  • Missouri lawmakers negotiate the final version of the state budget.

 

  • A petition to raise the minimum wage in Missouri has reached the secretary of state.

 

  • A Missouri House committee backs legislation that would change restrictions on who may ride with permit drivers.

 

 

Mo. minimum wage increase pending

May 7, 2012
David Shane / Flickr

 

A petition to raise the minimum wage in Missouri has reached the secretary of state.

File / KBIA

Supporters of raising Missouri's minimum wage and limiting payday loans have submitted petitions to get the measures on the November ballot.

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:

  • Columbia City Manager stands behind police chief Ken Burton.
  • A possible minimum wage increase.
  • Whistleblowers could face reduced protections

Judge upholds minimum wage ballot summary

Apr 26, 2012

A judge upheld the language of a proposed ballot initiative Thursday that, if passed, would raise the state minimum wage from $7.25 an hour to $8.25. Kansas City Restaurant Owner Victor Allred challenged the initiative, claiming the language was unfair. But Cole County Circuit Judge rejected his challenge. Missouri Jobs for Justice is the group supporting the initiative, and will turn in the signatures to the Missouri Attorney General next week. 

Regional news coverage from the KBIA Newsroom, including:

The City Council has approved two new measures that affect the way evictions are carried out in Columbia.

A Missouri appeals court has upheld a 2009 decision by state utility regulators to approve a rate increase for Ameren Missouri.

One of eight people charged in the shooting death of a Missouri football player's cousin has been sentenced to 25 years in prison.