missouri

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A person familiar with the matter says the Justice Department is close to an agreement with the police department in Ferguson, Missouri, about making widespread changes within the agency.

Such an overhaul could avert a civil rights lawsuit that federal officials have the option to bring against departments that resist changing their practices.

The person was not authorized to discuss the matter by name and spoke only on condition of anonymity.

stephenconn / Flickr

 Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has ordered state agencies to identify any gender wage gaps and take action to ensure women are paid the same as men for the same work.

Talking Politics - 2016 Election Observations

Nov 17, 2015
Sully Fox / KBIA file photo

Welcome to Talking Politics. KBIA’s weekly show dedicated to talking about local and national politics. 

On this week’s Talking Politics, Columbia College political science professor Dr. Terry Smith is here telling us what he and other political commentators are observing in the local and national political arena leading up to the 2016 election season.


Loaded Gun Found at Springfield School

Oct 16, 2015
gun
~Steve Z~ / flickr

 A loaded gun was found in the backpack of southwest Missouri elementary student.

David Shane / Flickr

 Missouri's attorney general race is heating up as major donors pick sides in an expected Republican primary.

 

Missouri’s Restorative Justice Program gives offenders the opportunity to repay the community for their crimes with community service and labor.

Val Vennet / Google Images

Operations have been shut down at a central Missouri plant that makes materials used in fracking.

Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

  Authorities in rural northeast Missouri are looking for the person who fired several shots into a small church.

File / KBIA

Suburban St. Louis businessman John Brunner says he's ready to move forward with a campaign for Missouri governor in 2016.

money
File Photo / Flickr

Starting this week, delinquent Missouri taxpayers can pay back taxes without penalties or interest under a temporary amnesty program. The program begins tomorrow and runs through November 30th. 

Participants must follow tax laws and pay on time for the next eight years or face paying previously waived fines and interest. Revenue department estimates show roughly 350,000 taxpayers could be eligible, potentially making the program one of the most high-impact legislative measures this year.

Officials say flooding and resulting strong currents in waterways are the main causes for the increase.

The New York Times has had to walk back its story on a "criminal" probe of Hillary Clinton's private email server while the paper is vigorously defending another of its exclusives...on abuses in the nail salon industry.  The first Republican presidential debate is only a week away.  Some wonder whether all the scrambling to meet the Fox News criteria for inclusion is worth the trouble.  More bad news for the newspaper business: major layoffs and poor performance with minority employment.  Media companies are embracing a new revenue source that raises ethical questions.  And research shows "visual" news sites are more successful.

Under the Microscope: Record-Breaking Spring Storms could be the New Normal

Jul 2, 2015
Abby Wendle / Harvest Public Media

 Driving down a two-lane highway in rural Missouri, Matt Plenge squinted at a patch of gray clouds hanging low over his farm fields in the distance.

“Does it look hazy up there?” he asked. “We only had a 20 percent chance today. We shouldn't get any rain.”

Plenge, like most farmers, always keeps one eye on the weather. But this spring, it’s been his primary and constant concern.

 


The contents of a time capsule sealed inside the Missouri Capitol are seeing the light of day for the first time in 100 years. The copper box was removed last week from the southeast cornerstone of the Capitol building, where it had sat since June 24, 1915.

Kathleen Masterson / Harvest Public Media

As the number of farms hit with avian flu grows over 100 nationwide, regulators are implementing containment plans meant to stop the virus’ spread, spare millions of at-risk birds and thousands of poultry farms.

Farms in many states, including Iowa, Missouri and Kansas, are struggling to contain an active outbreak.

 

 

KBIA

The makeshift memorial that has marked the site of where Michael Brown was fatally shot by a police officer in August now has been cleared out, and a permanent plaque will be placed nearby.

Puppy in cage
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri topped the United States Humane Society’s annual “Horrible Hundred” list for the third year in a row.  This list features the nation’s worst puppy mills, 23 of which were located in Missouri.

Under the Microscope: Missouri Researchers Push for Beetle Rollout

May 7, 2015
Jacob Grace

Wearing latex gloves and digging through a sloppy patch of cow poop on his farm in central Missouri, farmer Ralph Voss spotted his target.

“Okay, here we go!” he said excitedly, plucking out a shiny insect the size of a sunflower seed – a dung beetle.

Despite their disgusting homes, dung beetles are worth searching for – it has been estimated that they save U.S. farmers hundreds of millions of dollars a year. Some researchers suggest that they could be worth even more, and are searching for new species meant to maximize that value.

 


Provided by the University of Missouri Extension

McDonald County, Missouri, is home to many immigrant groups that have moved into the county in the last twenty years. These groups include Hispanic, Somali, Burmese, Sudanese and numerous others. And while these groups do not overlap culturally, they do share one thing - language acts as a barrier to access when it comes to their health.


Rebecca Smith / KBIA

McDonald County, Missouri, is a small community in the very southwestern-most part of the state that few people are aware of. Some residents describe it as a beautiful part of Missouri with rolling hills and numerous creeks. 

But there is more than scenery to McDonald County, as its communities - Anderson, Noel, Pineville, Southwest City - are home to an incredibly diverse mix of people. Towns now include a white population, Hispanic immigrants, Somali and Sudanese refugees, individuals from Burma and Micronesia and new immigrants are entering the county every day.

So here are some residents of the county talking about life, about health and about their home.


Heather Adams / KBIA

Since 1975 schools have been mandated by law to provide free, appropriate education to all children, leaving states and schools to figure out what this means for educating children with special needs.The first school for the deaf in the United States opened in the early 1800’ s in Hartford, Connecticut.Since then new educational opportunities and laws have created a wide range of choices for students with disabilities.When Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, or IDEA, passed in 2006, there was a push for more inclusive education.This meant the closure of many separate, state - funded schools for the disabled across the country and new integration for children in standard public schools.But Missouri still has 34 state schools for the severely disabled. 


missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

  Indiana has drawn national attention for its religious freedom restoration act, and now Missouri lawmakers have two smaller scale bills on the table. The two bills, which are in the Missouri Senate and House could take away the ability of colleges and universities to police discrimination by religious student organizations.


missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Bills in the Missouri Senate and House would take away college and universities’ ability to police discrimination by religious student organizations. KBIA’s Kyle Norris has more on the bills and how college students around the state are reacting.

Title IX Attorneys Conduct Forum for MU Faculty Members

Apr 9, 2015
University of Missouri

Two legal consultants from Pennsylvania spoke at MU on Tuesday, conducting two open forums where faculty could voice their questions and concerns about the university’s new Title IX policies.

Daniela Vidal and Jacqueline LeBlanc / KBIA

  You might not expect to find too much of Mexico in Missouri. But small towns across the state, like Mexico, Missouri are adapting to a growing Latino population.

The last census reported the state of Missouri saw a nearly 80 percent increase in the Latino population from 2000 to 2010.

So it’s no surprise to hear conversations in Spanish when you step into Diva 27, a Mexican grocery and clothing store in Mexico.  Boxes of tortillas, fresh sweet bread, spices and figurines of famous Mexican comedians line the shelves.

A 33-yer-old man from Richwoods, Missouri has broken the state record for the largest fish ever caught.

Andy Belobraydic, III’s family has been celebrating March 21stfor about 35 years—it’s his parents’ wedding anniversary.

On Saturday, while angling on Table Rock Lake, he snagged a 140 pound, 9 ounce, Paddlefish. The fish, which was caught on the James River arm of the lake in Stone County, measured 56 ¾ inches in length and had a girth of 43 ¾ inches.

Flickr

A Westminster College chapter of a national fraternity has been suspended indefinitely due to hazing and offensive comments on a social media site. 

With This Missouri Teacher, The Lesson Is Live

Mar 11, 2015

Each weekday morning, promptly at 7:20 a.m., Robyn King's students go live.

"Are we ready?" King asked on a recent Monday, holding up a single finger pointed at two wide-eyed students sitting at a desk in front of a tripod-mounted iPad. "OK, here we go."

401 (K) 2013 / FLICKR

A measure that would waive penalties if Missourians agree to pay back taxes has initial approval from the state House. 

MU’s newly-hired provost Garnett Stokes spoke to media Wednesday about her plans for the university and other academic programs.

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