missouri budget

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Increased funding for public education is expected to be a boon to early childhood programs in Missouri.

Extra money is available because Republican lawmakers passed a bill to fully fund the school finance formula for the first time in recent memory. That full funding triggered a 2014 law that allows districts to receive money for pre-K.

The program could cost more than $62 million if all districts take advantage. Educators say that likely won't happen in the first year.

Senate floor at the Missouri Capitol
File / KBIA

JEFFERSON CITY -- Missouri Senate budgeters have approved a plan to make cuts to in-home and nursing care for disabled residents while slightly increasing money for public K-12 schools.

The Senate Appropriations Committee on Thursday passed its version of a budget for the next fiscal year beginning in July.

The budget proposal would cut in-home and nursing care by requiring people to show more severe disabilities to qualify, although the cuts are not as deep as what Gov. Eric Greitens initially recommended.

ALEX HEUER / St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens is laying out his plans for the state budget amid financial strain and lagging revenue.

Greitens is to announce his proposed budget Thursday at a Nixa public school. He broke from tradition by not outlining his budget during his January State of the State address.

Greitens' budget proposal will come during what's shaping up to be a challenging time for state finances. Revenues so far this fiscal year have been lower than expected, and hundreds of millions of dollars have been cut to balance this year's budget.

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri schools will get additional money because Gov. Jay Nixon has decided to reverse a few of the budget cuts he made earlier this year.

Nixon on Wednesday released about $12 million of previously blocked spending, including $9 million for public schools. The Democratic governor cited a report released a day earlier showing Missouri revenues grew by 5.8 percent in September compared with the same time last year.

The school funding was part of $59 million of budget cuts Nixon announced last month, after lawmakers overrode his vetoes to enact new tax breaks.

j.stephenconn / flickr

Missouri's budget director says revenue is up 3.4 percent compared to the same time last year.

Director Dan Haug on Thursday announced that the state brought in about $8.1 billion in the current fiscal year through May. At the same time last year, the state had $7.8 billion.

Revenue in May was up 12 percent compared to May 2015.

Individual income tax collections increased more than 4 percent so far this year and more than 12 percent last month. The state's collected roughly $6.6 billion.

File photo / KBIA

JEFFERSON CITY - Gov. Jay Nixon chose Missouri State University as his venue to sign the Fiscal Year 2017 higher education budget into law Wednesday.

The school in Springfield achieved all of its performance goals, equaling an increase of $3.6 million in funding.

“When we talk about holding tuition, we’ve not done that for free. Okay? We have put dollars in to make sure that at the same time we were getting increases in quality,” said Nixon. 

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

JEFFERSON CITY - Lawmakers have trimmed about $7.3 million from Missouri's mid-year budget increase of nearly $500 million.

A House panel approved the reductions Wednesday along with limits on Governor Jay Nixon's travel expenses and less flexibility in how some health care funds are spent. Proposals for soil erosion projects and a grant program for ethanol-blended fuel pumps were also reduced.

j. stephenconn / Flickr

Missouri senators have narrowly passed a budget for state social services despite hours of late-night debate and filibusters.

The budget passed with the minimum 18 votes needed early Wednesday. Fifteen lawmakers voted against it.

  

Who should have the power over the Missouri budget? The legislature, which writes the budget? Or the governor who is constitutionally required to balance it?

The latest salvo in the ongoing battle between Missouri's Democratic governor and the Republican-led legislature over the state budget is Amendment 10 on the November ballot. 

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon followed through with his earlier threat by vetoing on Wednesday 10 bills passed during the last day of the legislative session. The bills set up special tax breaks for a variety of businesses, from restaurants to data centers.

nixon
File photo / KBIA

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has spoken out about legislation recently passed by the Missouri General Assembly.

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Missouri lawmakers have passed a budget that would restore Medicaid benefits cut a decade ago and boost spending on public education.

missouri capitol
File Photo / KBIA

The Missouri Senate has endorsed a construction funding bill that includes projects on college campuses and for the Highway Patrol.

A controversial tax cut proposal has been sent to Gov. Jay Nixon, after the Missouri House passed it late Wednesday afternoon.

Because of a dispute over how much money to put in this year's supplemental budget, Gov. Jay Nixon has cut $22 million from public schools and higher education.  

Nixon, a Democrat, announced Thursday that he's cutting $15.6 million from the current budget for K-12 schools, $3.2 million from community colleges, and $3.2 million from four-year institutions. 

Budget writers in the Missouri Senate have begun their review of the state's spending plan for Fiscal Year 2015.

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Republican House leaders are scrapping Gov. Jay Nixon's recommendations for Missouri's budget.

Missouri Capitol
File / KBIA

A study by the Pew Charitable Trusts shows that Missouri is in the top ten states when it comes to using cost-benefit analysis of taxpayer money. 

Cost-benefit programs analyze the cost of public programs and the benefits they provide taxpayers.  In short, it’s the study of how much bang taxpayers are getting for their buck. And it can be a very effective tool when drafting new laws or policy.

joplin
File / KBIA

Missouri’s final tab for the Joplin tornado and the 2011 flooding has proven to be much smaller than what Gov. Jay Nixon anticipated.

Figures provided to The Associated Press by Nixon's budget office show that the state's share for the disasters is a little more than $36 million. That's only a quarter of the $150 million that Nixon set aside in the budget in 2011.

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Gov. Jay Nixon has continued to make budget cuts based on concerns that the Legislature might do something that could reduce future tax revenues.

Nixon's recent announcement of $400 million of spending restrictions is the latest example of how he has tested the constitutional boundaries of a governor's authority to control the budget.

Nixon says he has clear legal authority, but Republican legislative leaders contend he does not.

Governor Jay Nixon vetoed legislation Wednesday that would have cut Missouri’s income tax rates for the first time in 90 years.

The Republican-led General Assembly passed the bill in large part pointing to neighboring Kansas which already has slashed its personal and corporate income taxes.

But as St. Louis Public Radio’s Maria Altman reports, the Democratic governor says the cuts would hurt Missouri education and other state services.

Missouri House and Senate budget negotiators have crafted a final version of next year's state budget.


The nearly $25 billion spending plan includes a $66 million increase for K-12 schools, and a $25 million hike for state universities and community colleges.  It still does not include the Medicaid expansion proposed by Governor Jay Nixon (D), which disappointed committee member and State Senator Kiki Curls (D, Kansas City).

File photo / KBIA

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has signed legislation allowing for an additional $219 million in state spending during the current fiscal year.

Andrew Magill / Flickr

Missouri has used a state budget reserve fund to improve its cash flow.

File / KBIA

The Missouri House will begin debate Tuesday on the 13 bills that make up next year’s state budget.

The three bills that encompass the state’s Medicaid program don’t include Governor Jay Nixon’s (D) proposed expansion, although House Democrats may try to offer amendments to change that.  Budget chairman Rick Stream (R, Kirkwood) says the state should have more of a say in how Medicaid dollars are handled.

_J_D_R_ / Flickr

Officials at the Missouri Lottery have no strategy to generate an additional $35 million that legislative budget writers and Gov. Jay Nixon's administration had hoped would help avoid cuts to government services.

Governor Jay Nixon’s withholdings announced Friday are expected to be felt by Missouri’s higher-education institutions. Nixon announced the removal of $9 million from the budgets of Missouri’s public colleges and universities, effective July 1st. It’s part of $15 million withheld from a budget Nixon says is $50 million out of balance. 

 

A disagreement over $2 million for a university is contributing to a stalemate on Missouri's $24 billion budget plan.

Republican House Speaker Steven Tilley wants to add the money for his alma mater, Southeast Missouri State University. The Cape Girardeau school has the second lowest funding-to-student ratio among Missouri's public universities.

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