missouri department of corrections

A motion for judgment has been filed in a lawsuit accusing the state of violating Sunshine Laws for refusing to provide information related to Missouri executions.

The filing seeks to expedite a lawsuit filed earlier this year by stating there is no dispute in the core facts of the case, which calls on the court to order the Department of Corrections to release details about the drugs used in lethal injections. It also seeks to identify the pharmacies and laboratories that create and test the drugs.

Missouri Department of Corrections

A Missouri inmate has been put to death for raping and killing a neighbor in 1995, the first lethal injection in the U.S. since an execution in Arizona went awry last month.

For the fourth time this year, an inmate's lethal injection did not go as planned. Last night, it was Arizona, but the state has company.

An Ohio inmate took 25 minutes to die in January. In Oklahoma, there were two apparent botches: In one,  an inmate said, "I feel my whole body burning," and in another, the prisoner took more than 40 minutes to die.

But Arizona's execution took even longer. Joseph Wood's execution began at 1:52 p.m., and he died nearly two hours later at 3:49 p.m.

Missouri Department of Corrections

The Missouri Supreme Court has set an Aug. 6 execution for a St. Louis area man convicted of raping and killing a neighbor nearly two decades ago.

vegetables
Martin Cathrae / Flickr

A Missouri prison program has donated a record 163 tons of fresh fruit and vegetables to food pantries, shelters, churches, nursing homes and schools this year.

A month ago, St. Louis Public Radio reported on the questionable manner in which the state of Missouri got ahold of its potential execution drug. Now Missouri has a new plan to go ahead with two upcoming executions, but the process is anything but open.

Updated 11/14/13 3:24 p.m.

Two weeks ago, Gov. Jay Nixon instructed the Missouri Department of Corrections to come up with a new procedure for carrying out lethal injections.

On Tuesday, the department announced that it had chosen a new execution drug: pentobarbital. But the state also made a change that will end up making it harder, if not impossible, to know where the drugs come from.

On Tuesday, the Missouri Department of Corrections announced that it had selected a new drug for upcoming executions: pentobarbital.

The change comes following criticism of the questionable methods Missouri had obtained the drug it had previously planned to use, as well as concern that its use could harm hospitals throughout the U.S. The state had planned to use a common anesthetic named propofol, which has never been used to carry out an execution.

propofol
Nottingham Vet School / Flikr

  The Missouri Department of Corrections is sending a shipment of propofol back to the distributor, 11 months after the company urgently requested for the anesthetic to be returned.

Missouri plans to be the first state to use propofol in an execution on Oct. 23. The department says in a news release Wednesday that it has remaining inventory, but it doesn't say if enough remains for two executions scheduled in the coming weeks.

Missouri Department of Corrections

Friends and family gathered in Woodcrest Chapel on Friday to honor the life of Tom Clements, the Colorado Department of Corrections executive director who was killed March 19.

Clements lived in Columbia for 27 years before moving to Colorado in 2011. He and his family attended Woodcrest for 15 of those years. Clements worked at the Missouri Department of Corrections for about three decades, working his way up from probation officer to director of the Division of Adult Institutions.

The shooting death of Colorado's top prisons official is resonating in Columbia, where the former Missouri Department of Corrections administrator raised a family and lived for decades.

Like many state government workers, Tom Clements commuted to Jefferson City from Columbia.
Former neighbor Chuck Headley says Clements was a serious bicyclist and devoted father whose job overseeing Missouri's 20 adult prisons didn't outwardly intrude upon their quiet suburban neighborhood.

KBIA file photo

Democrat State Senator Joe Keaveny introduced Senate Bill 786 Monday, which would require state auditors to compare the cost of the death penalty with other sentences.