missouri flooding

Nixon seeks disaster declaration for 22 counties

Aug 27, 2013
Jay Nixon
File Photo / KBIA

Gov. Jay Nixon is asking the federal government to issue a major disaster declaration for 22 southern Missouri counties hit hard by this month's floods.

Nixon said Tuesday the costs of emergency response and repairs will be high.

The floods that resulted from nearly two weeks of heavy rain caused widespread damage across the southern tier and left at least three people dead.

Nixon announced his request in Conway, where the wastewater treatment system was heavily damaged.

joplin
File / KBIA

Missouri’s final tab for the Joplin tornado and the 2011 flooding has proven to be much smaller than what Gov. Jay Nixon anticipated.

Figures provided to The Associated Press by Nixon's budget office show that the state's share for the disasters is a little more than $36 million. That's only a quarter of the $150 million that Nixon set aside in the budget in 2011.

PG Palmer / Flickr

The Columbia/Boone County’s Office of Emergency Management is urging those out celebrating Memorial Day today to use caution, especially when driving, after recent rains have flooded some area roads.

Residents are advised to pay attention to flash flood warnings that have been issued for the area, and to –  “turn around, don’t drown” rather than attempting to drive through flooded areas.

A thunderstorm producing hail and capable of tornadoes hit the Mid-Missouri area on Wednesday evening. While Columbia experienced minimal power outages, citizens of Monroe, Missouri had no power Thursday morning.

Missouri levee
USACEpublicaffairs / Flickr

The first phase of restoration work has been completed on a Mississippi River levee that was intentionally breached in 2011 during record flooding.

Tech. Sgt. Oscar Sanchez USDA / Flickr

Flood protection projects are progressing on both sides of the Mississippi River in southeast Missouri and southern Illinois.

A most unusual planting season

May 16, 2012
Rick Fredericksen / Iowa Public Radio

On this bright spring morning at Blackbird Bend, along the Missouri River, the scene is a little odd.  A 24-row corn planter is brushing over the tops of a stunning winter wheat crop, 12 inches high.

A new report from the Rocky Mountain Climate Organization and the Natural Resources Defense Council shows that the frequency of severe storms across the Midwest has doubled over the past 50 years.

The report analyzed precipitation data from more than 200 weather stations in eight Midwestern states.

Hundreds of “streamflow gauges” that are used to monitor rising water levels across the nation are in danger of being shut down – but Missouri’s gauge stations may avoid that fate.