missouri hospital association

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The Affordable Care Act included a temporary bump in the Medicaid fees paid to physicians for certain primary care services. The intention behind the two-year, federally-funded increase was to encourage more physicians to participate in Medicaid to accommodate an expanding pool of Medicaid patients anticipated by the law.

But a 2012 Supreme Court decision opened a window for states to reject Medicaid expansion – Missouri is one of 23 states that have chosen not to expanded coverage – and as of Jan. 1, the Medicaid fee bump is expired as well.

I spoke with Dave Dillon and Andrew Wheeler of the Missouri Hospital Association (MHA) about the impact the fee increase expiration will have on Missouri hospitals.


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Almost 800,000 uninsured Missourians became eligible for coverage through the federal health insurance marketplace earlier this year. As the state continues to consider extending coverage to even more individuals through Medicaid expansion, the need for primary care doctors will increase as well.

Mo. hospital group charts admission improvements

Oct 24, 2013
hospital room
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The Missouri Hospital Association says there has been a decline in the number of hospital admissions for preventable issues.

MU Hospital
KBIA

Missouri hospitals report providing a record $1.1 billion of uncompensated care to patients in 2011.

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Democratic Governor Jay Nixon is preparing to announce his support for a major health care initiative.

Nixon scheduled news conferences Thursday at Truman Medical Center in Kansas City, Barnes Jewish Center in St. Louis and Jordan Valley Community Health Center in Springfield.

He will be joined at some of the stops by officials from the Missouri Hospital Association and the Missouri Primary Care Association. Both groups are part of a new coalition urging Missouri to expand Medicaid eligibility as called for by President Barack Obama's health care law.

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The Missouri Hospital Association said Missouri has reduced healthcare acquired infections for a number of years now.

Missouri Hospital Association Spokesperson Dave Dillon said for more than a decade they have been trying to create programs which lessen the chances for infectious mistakes in healthcare settings.

"When you’re cognizant of what you are doing you can reduce the type of steps that can cause an infection," Dillon said. "So, we’ve continued to see those rates move downward as hospitals have adopted those.”