Missouri House

Marijuana
lancerok / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY - A proposal to legalize medical marijuana has again failed in the Missouri House.

Lawmakers voted down the measure today, 85-71. The legislation would have allowed doctors to recommend marijuana for patients suffering from debilitating illnesses, such as AIDS or epilepsy.

The proposal also would have created a licensing regime for commercial marijuana growers and retailers.

House lawmakers killed a similar measure in April after scaling it back to only cover hospice patients.

missouri house floor
File photo / KBIA

Some Missouri lawmakers want to protect lodging websites such as Airbnb from local ordinances that could regulate the services out of business in the state.

Scott Davidson / Flickr

Some Missouri lawmakers want to protect lodging websites such as Airbnb from local ordinances that could regulate the services out of business in the state.

Marijuana
lancerok / Flickr

Legislation that would legalize medical marijuana cultivation with tight restrictions on who could use the drug has won initial approval in the Missouri House.

Missouri Capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

A proposed state constitutional amendment that would virtually outlaw abortion in Missouri is one step closer to being debated by the full State House.  

Thomas Hawk / Flickr

Missouri cities no longer could ban pit bulls under a bill advancing in the Legislature.

j.stephenconn / flickr

The Missouri House is advancing legislation to ban donation of fetal tissue from abortions.

David Shane / Flickr

The public has a chance to give Missouri lawmakers feedback on a proposed constitutional amendment to protect some businesses that object to same-sex marriage.

Luke Runyon / Harvest Public Media

Missouri would legalize the growing of industrial hemp as a raw material for manufacturing under a measure advancing in the Legislature.

File Photo / KBIA

The Missouri House is advancing regulations for ride-hailing companies such as Uber and Lyft.

Missouri Capitol
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Missouri lawmakers' effort to strip Planned Parenthood of any state money faces an uncertain path forward.

File Photo / KBIA

JEFFERSON CITY - The House has endorsed a bill creating a grant program to attract more conventions to Missouri.

Lawmakers gave initial approval Wednesday to a measure authorizing grants for large conventions that could cover up to half the operating expenses. Eligible conventions would have to draw at least half their attendees from out of state, and their grants would be tied to how many hotel rooms their attendees are expected to fill.

The fund would be capped at $3 million annually.

j.stephenconn / flickr

JEFFERSON CITY - Missouri lawmakers have passed a spending plan that includes about $69 million more for K-12 schools and nearly $10 million more in performance funding for higher education.

The House Budget Committee on Wednesday passed a package of bills outlining state spending. The measures cover the fiscal year that begins July 1.

David Shane / Flickr

The Missouri House has passed legislation restricting public access to some government data on farms and ranches.

David Shane / Flickr

The Legislature has given final approval to legislation that would create a new circuit court in southwest Missouri.

David Shane / Flickr

A drug that treats heroin overdoses could become easier to acquire in Missouri under legislation in the House.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Legislation requiring a private company to scrutinize Missouri's welfare rolls has won initial approval in the House.

Under the bill endorsed Tuesday, the state would hire a company to check people's eligibility for programs such as food stamps. The company would flag cases for state employees to investigate.

Bill sponsor Rep. Marsha Haefner said the proposal could save more than $20 million over the next three years by eliminating waste and fraud.

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Missouri is among the majority of states that restrict access to original birth certificates for people who were adopted.

A proposed ban on lobbyist gifts to lawmakers and other elected officials has initial approval in the Missouri House.

House members voted for the ban in a voice vote Tuesday. Lobbyists currently can give unlimited gifts, such as sports tickets, to lawmakers.

Lobbyists could pay for events if they invite all lawmakers and all statewide elected officials in writing.

Senators Tuesday questioned other ethics-related measures already passed by the House.

Two companion measures that would require Missouri voters to show photo identification at the polls have been passed by a House committee.

The first one, HJR 53, is a proposed constitutional amendment that would allow for a photo ID requirement, and would need to first be passed by Missouri voters.

It appears that Republican leaders in the Missouri House and Senate are putting their money where their mouths are when it comes to ethics changes.

During his opening speech, House Speaker Todd Richardson, R-Poplar Bluff, said he'll refer all ethics bills to committee on Thursday, a move that often takes place days, weeks, and sometimes months after the start of a legislative session.

House Speaker Todd Richardson’s legislative career is full of defied expectations.

Before he was elected to House leadership, Richardson helped bring substantial changes to Missouri’s embattled Second Injury Fund – an issue that bedeviled lawmakers for years. And after the misdeeds of his predecessor, the Poplar Bluff Republican rose to the speakership much earlier than anybody expected.

j.stephenconn / Flickr

The Missouri House was 13 votes short of overriding Governor Jay Nixon’s veto of the right to work bill during its veto session yesterday. 

Missouri House Speaker Todd Richardson is maintaining that a proposed new dress code for interns is not, and will not, be among the recommendations for improving their working conditions.

House members have been working on several suggestions, which Richardson says will be released at a later date.

Every bill Missouri lawmakers sent to Gov. Jay Nixon this year has now been signed or vetoed, with only one bill becoming law without his signature.

That bill, HB 137, tweaks the bidding process for license fee offices by doing away with rewarding points to bidders based on how much revenue the state would get back in return. It was co-sponsored by state Rep. Dean Dohrman, R-LaMonte.

Senate floor at the Missouri Capitol
File / KBIA

Missouri Senate leaders have approved a workplace policy book that includes steps for dealing with allegations of harassment.

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