missouri legislature

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An advocacy group is pushing the Missouri Legislature to reconsider how it awards scholarships for a 30-year-old program designed to keep the brightest college students in the state.

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Missouri lawmakers who want a private firm to scrutinize the state's welfare rolls say it could save money by ending benefits for people who aren't actually eligible.

Missouri Senate discussing concealed weapons on college campuses

Jan 27, 2016
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JEFFERSON CITY — Missouri lawmakers have begun discussing whether to allow concealed weapons on college campuses.

A Senate committee began hearing testimony Wednesday on a bill that would only allow campuses to ban concealed weapons if the school posts armed guards and metal detectors at every entrance to every campus building.

Other bills in the House and Senate would also expand access to guns on campuses.

For his final state budget, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is taking no risks.

His proposed budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1 features no grand gestures of setting up new programs, and calls for limited increases for the state’s current operations.

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Three more ethics bills have been approved by a Missouri House committee. One would ban individual gifts from lobbyists to lawmakers, the second would revise rules for investing campaign funds, and the third would expand the definition of public official to include members of a task force appointed by the governor. 

That last bill is sponsored by Republican Jay Barnes of Jefferson City:

A move to abolish the death penalty in the Show-Me State is getting a hearing before a Missouri Senate committee.

Senate Bill 816 is sponsored by Sen. Paul Weiland, R-Imperial. He told the committee on general laws that being a pro-life Republican should also include the end of life.

Updated 5:49 p.m. Jan. 14 - In Missouri, it usually takes a few weeks or even a month for the first bills to be completely passed out of one chamber and sent to the other, but not this year.

The Missouri House fast-tracked four ethics bills and on Thursday passed them on to the Senate, during the first full week of the legislative session.

A Missouri Senate committee is weighing legislation that would eliminate the 1 percent earnings tax in both St. Louis and Kansas City, effective Dec. 31, 2017.

Republican Kurt Schaefer, R-Columbia, who's also running for attorney general, brought his bill before the Senate committee on ways and means Thursday.  He said that a similar tax in Maryland was ruled unconstitutional, and it could cost Missouri millions of dollars if the same thing happens here.

Two companion measures that would require Missouri voters to show photo identification at the polls have been passed by a House committee.

The first one, HJR 53, is a proposed constitutional amendment that would allow for a photo ID requirement, and would need to first be passed by Missouri voters.

It appears that Republican leaders in the Missouri House and Senate are putting their money where their mouths are when it comes to ethics changes.

During his opening speech, House Speaker Todd Richardson, R-Poplar Bluff, said he'll refer all ethics bills to committee on Thursday, a move that often takes place days, weeks, and sometimes months after the start of a legislative session.

Ron Richard is about to spend his first full session as president pro-tem of the Missouri Senate.

He was elected to the post by his colleagues in September after Tom Dempsey resigned a year ahead of time, and shepherded the upper chamber through veto session. The Republican from Joplin also served as House Speaker from 2009 to 2010, and is the only elected official in Missouri history to lead both chambers.

Richard sat down recently with St. Louis Public Radio’s Marshall Griffin and talked about what he hopes to accomplish, and about getting started as president pro-tem:

House Speaker Todd Richardson’s legislative career is full of defied expectations.

Before he was elected to House leadership, Richardson helped bring substantial changes to Missouri’s embattled Second Injury Fund – an issue that bedeviled lawmakers for years. And after the misdeeds of his predecessor, the Poplar Bluff Republican rose to the speakership much earlier than anybody expected.

Missouri Capitol
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A Missouri judge has ruled against a challenge to the state Senate's vote overriding Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of measure that could reduce the number of weeks residents can collect unemployment benefits.

The push to make life better for women inside the Missouri Capitol strikes a chord for people like Kelly Schultz. One of the main lessons she learned about dealing with harassment is the importance of having a structure in place.

Before she embarked on a 16-year career in and around the Missouri Capitol, Schultz worked at a central Missouri police station. There, Schultz faced sexual harassment from one of her male officers.

money
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Starting this week, delinquent Missouri taxpayers can pay back taxes without penalties or interest under a temporary amnesty program. The program begins tomorrow and runs through November 30th. 

Participants must follow tax laws and pay on time for the next eight years or face paying previously waived fines and interest. Revenue department estimates show roughly 350,000 taxpayers could be eligible, potentially making the program one of the most high-impact legislative measures this year.

money
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The Kansas City Council has agreed to put a citizen group's minimum wage petition on the November ballot.

Gov. Jay Nixon made a return appearance Thursday to the State Fair's annual ham breakfast, after pulling out of last year's event due to the unrest in Ferguson.

He told reporters at the fair that progress has been made in advancing social justice in Ferguson one year after the fatal shooting of Michael Brown by former police officer Darren Wilson.

Jay Nixon
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon has received hundreds of messages urging action as he considers pending student transfers legislation. 

As expected, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has vetoed the “right-to-work” bill passed by state lawmakers just before their session ended last month.

The measure would stop employers from making union dues a condition of employment. As it stands now, unions and businesses can make that requirement if a majority of workers have voted to be in a union.

St. Louis’ political leadership will make a quick attempt to raise the city’s minimum wage, a public policy initiative they contend is economically and morally just.

But whether the city possesses the authority to raise its minimum wage is something of a moving target – and could depend on whether a bill that many Democrats despise is enacted into law.

Missouri House of Representatives

A Missouri lawmaker has had his pharmacist's license placed on probation for writing prescriptions for himself and others without a doctor's approval. 

Missouri House of Representatives

St. Peters Representative Robert Cornejo has entered what could be a crowded race for Missouri House majority leader. 

An investigation by the Missouri Senate and the University of Central Missouri appears to be underway into whether there was inappropriate treatment of another Missouri legislative intern, although there has been no official confirmation.

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  Young adults in the custody of the state who earn money from work or job training may have funds deposited in a trust fund under a measure sent to Missouri's governor today.

(Updated 11 a.m. Friday, May 15) Missouri Rep. Todd Richardson, R-Poplar Bluff, was elected and sworn in as new House speaker Friday, and swiftly got the House back to the business at hand — passing bills in the final hours of a surreal last week of session.

"This is not the time for speeches,'' Richardson said, ending tumultuous applause from the packed chamber. "This is a time to get back to work."

Missouri Senate leaders are hoping to find a way to pass a critical medical funding bill, despite the chamber being all but shut down.

Amid a sex-text scandal engulfing the House speaker, the Missouri House voted Wednesday to approve an anti-union bill that would make Missouri the nation's 26th "right-to-work" state.

But the 92-66 vote was well shy the 109 needed to override Gov. Jay Nixon’s promised veto, prompting even some Republican lawmakers to blast their leadership for pressing for the controversial matter during the session’s final week.

File Photo / KBIA

  The Missouri House has sent Gov. Jay Nixon an omnibus environmental bill with provisions that effect wastewater treatment, pollution control and hydraulic fracturing. 

File / KBIA

Missouri's Republican-controlled Legislature already has powered through many GOP priorities as lawmakers approach a Friday deadline to pass bills.

File / KBIA

A new $35 million headquarters for the State Historical Society of Missouri is included in a bill awaiting Governor Jay Nixon's signature.

The Columbia Missourian reports that preliminary plans call for the historical society to be moved out of the University of Missouri's Ellis Library and into a new building in downtown Columbia. Funding for the building is part of a bill that includes $376.7 million for capital improvement projects around the state.

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