missouri legislature

File Photo / KBIA

A recent special legislative session on abortion policies cost Missouri taxpayers nearly $92,000.

Figures provided to The Associated Press show the House spent about $60,000 and the Senate nearly $32,000 on the session that ran from mid-June to late July.

The session resulted in a new law that will tighten abortion regulations, give the attorney general power to prosecute violations and exempt pregnancy resource centers from a St. Louis ordinance banning discrimination based on "reproductive health decisions."

Missouri lawmakers routinely have denied requests to make their emails available through open records requests. Now, a conservative nonprofit group is challenging the policy with a lawsuit that, should it succeed, will give the public more insight into how legislators make decisions.

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — Physicians will have to meet with women seeking abortions three days before the procedure and Missouri’s attorney general will have the ability to enforce abortion laws under the bill headed to Gov. Eric Greitens on Tuesday.

david_shane / Flickr

Pro-abortion rights supporters are rallying at the Missouri Capitol in opposition to Republican proposals to further regulate the procedure.

Roughly 200 people gathered in the Rotunda on Wednesday as the Republican-led Senate prepared to take up legislation that would, among other things, require annual inspections for abortion clinics and nullify a St. Louis ordinance prohibiting discrimination in hiring or housing based on reproductive decisions.

ALEX HEUER / St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri Senate leader says a bipartisan call to investigate the Republican governor won't advance during an ongoing special session.

Republican Senate Majority Leader Mike Kehoe said Wednesday that his ethics committee won't have a hearing on the proposal because the focus of the special session is abortion.

Two Democrats and four Republicans are calling for a legislative investigation of Gov. Eric Greitens.

Updated 7:45 p.m. May 22  with number of bills filed Monday – On the eve of his first legislative special session, Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens and his allied nonprofit group are attacking one of the pivotal legislators  needed to win approval of the governor’s favored bill.

The nonprofit group is called A New Missouri and can collect unlimited donations from unidentified donors. It is targeting state Sen. Doug Libla, a Republican whose southeast Missouri district includes the now-closed aluminum smelting plant that Greitens hopes to reopen, along with a possible steel mill.

Libla says he supports the projects. But the senator questions some provisions in the expected special-session bill that he says could reduce state oversight over Ameren, which provides electricity to much of eastern Missouri.

REAL ID Sits in Missouri Senate

Feb 28, 2017

In 2018, Missourians may have a harder time boarding flights and entering federal buildings using their driver’s license.

Missouri is one of five states that does not comply with REAL ID, the 2005 federal law that requires states to administer stricter standards for distributing state identification like driver’s licenses.


JEFFERSON CITY (AP) — A Missouri Democratic lawmaker is proposing a bill to make donations for gubernatorial inaugurations public records.

Liberty Rep. Mark Ellebracht in a Thursday statement criticized Republican Gov. Eric Greitens' decision to keep secret the cost of his privately funded January celebration.

Greitens did release a list of "benefactors," including Anheuser-Busch, Boeing, Express Scripts, General Motors, Monsanto and Wal-Mart.

Greitens spokesman Parker Briden declined to comment.

David Shane / Flickr

A Missouri House panel has voted to advance a right-to-work bill to bar mandatory union fees.

House Economic Development Committee members voted 8-4 in favor of the bill Wednesday.

Pay Raises Recommended for Missouri Elected Officials

Dec 14, 2016
David Shane / Flickr

 A citizen panel is recommending raises for Missouri elected officials.

The Citizens' Commission on Compensation for Elected Officials this month released a report calling for 8 percent raises in both fiscal years 2018 and 2019 for the governor and other statewide elected officials.

The panel also recommended raises of roughly 2 percent for lawmakers in both fiscal years.

The raises would cost the state about $470,000 over both fiscal years. Incoming Republican Gov.-elect Eric Greitens would get a raise of more than $22,000.

Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

 Gun control advocates and gun rights supporters are fanning out through the Missouri Capitol, lobbying lawmakers on a bill that would allow most people to carry concealed weapons without needing permits.

Missouri lawmakers are to consider Wednesday whether to override Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of the high-profile legislation.

The National Rifle Association set up shop in the Rotunda between the House and Senate and dispatched scores of volunteers to talk to lawmakers in support of the legislation. The organization distributed signs saying, "NRA. Stand and Fight."

David Shane / Flickr

  Missouri lawmakers have overridden Gov. Jay Nixon's veto of a measure to require voters to present photo identification at the polls.

The Republican-led Legislature overturned the Democratic governor's veto Wednesday after GOP senators forced an end to debate.

Lawmakers' action is the first step to enact the policy in the state. Voters on Nov. 8 also must vote to amend the Missouri Constitution to allow for a photo identification law in order for the policy to be enacted.

That's needed because the Missouri Supreme Court has previously found voter photo ID laws to be unconstitutional.

Update June 9 with signature: Gov. Jay Nixon signed legislation on Thursday that could expand Medicaid eligibility for Missourians who are elderly or living with a disability.

For decades, Missourians who were elderly, blind or disabled could only have $1,000 or less in savings. The bill Nixon signed would gradually raise that asset limit to $5,000 for an unmarried person and $10,000 for a married couple.

The Missouri Department of Conservation

Missouri conservation advocates say the case of a man who received a modest fine for killing a black bear shows why the state Legislature should put more teeth in poaching penalties.

The Springfield News-Leader reports 40-year-old Chris Keown of House Springs shot the bear with a muzzle-loading rifle around May 2 in a heavily wooded area near his home.

Austin Federa / KBIA

Regulations aimed at helping companies such as Uber and Lyft expand in Missouri died in the Legislature this year.

At issue is whether the ride-hailing companies are governed by uniform statewide rules or by varying rules from city to city. The companies say differing rules make it hard for them to do business. 

missouri capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

JEFFERSON CITY - Lobbyists could spend up to $40 a day per lawmaker on meals under legislation pending in the Missouri Senate.

Republican Sen. Dave Schatz unveiled the proposal Wednesday that would ban most gifts to lawmakers and public officials but still leave them with a healthy limit for meals.

Lobbyist spending currently has no limit in Missouri.

Backers say the proposal is a step forward, but critics say it doesn't go far enough. House members previously had approved a ban on lobbyist gifts except for meals offered to all lawmakers and statewide officials.

stopnlook / FLICKR

JEFFERSON CITY - The Missouri Legislature has passed a bill reviving a tax break for small businesses that add employees.

The bill given final approval Wednesday by the House allows businesses with fewer than 50 employees to claim a $10,000 tax deduction for each job they create that pays at least their county's average wage. Those businesses could claim a $20,000 deduction if they also cover at least half the cost of their employees' health insurance premiums.

The bill now goes to Gov. Jay Nixon.

Marijuana
lancerok / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY - A proposal to legalize medical marijuana has again failed in the Missouri House.

Lawmakers voted down the measure today, 85-71. The legislation would have allowed doctors to recommend marijuana for patients suffering from debilitating illnesses, such as AIDS or epilepsy.

The proposal also would have created a licensing regime for commercial marijuana growers and retailers.

House lawmakers killed a similar measure in April after scaling it back to only cover hospice patients.

missouri capitol
File Photo / KBIA

The Legislature has passed a grant program aimed at attracting conventions to Missouri.

classroom
Håkan Dahlström / Flickr

Missouri students would have to take CPR training and pass a civics exam before graduating high school under proposals that have cleared the Legislature.

missouri house floor
File photo / KBIA

A national gun control group says it is running an ad in Missouri's capital city urging lawmakers to reject a bill making it easier to carry concealed guns.

Missouri lawmakers have passed an income-tax deduction for active duty members of the military.

Missouri's schools would have to develop suicide prevention policies under a bill moving through the Legislature.

missouri capitol
File Photo / KBIA

Measures on union fees and changes to abortion policy are pending in the final week of Missouri's 2016 legislative session.

Missouri Capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

 The Missouri House has passed a controversial "personhood" measure opponents say could ban abortion, including in cases of rape and incest.

Missouri's Republican-led Legislature is weighing a number of tax breaks for businesses as the session wraps up.

j.stephenconn / flickr

There are two weeks left for the Missouri Legislature to pass bills, and some Democrats are frustrated another year has passed without major changes to the state's law enforcement policies.

Erik Drost / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY - Michael Sam, the first openly gay NFL draftee, is speaking out against a Missouri measure to protect some businesses that deny services for same-sex weddings.

Sam was among roughly 80 who rallied against the legislation Wednesday.

The former Mizzou football star came out as gay before the 2014 NFL draft and was selected by the St. Louis Rams before being cut in training camp.

Sam called a proposed constitutional amendment the opposite of respect and equality and said it doesn't reflect Missouri values.

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