missouri lottery

Missouri Lottery

  Missouri Lottery officials say the person who bought a winning $202.6 million Powerball ticket has yet to come forward.

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The Missouri Lottery says it expects to save about $700,000 a year with a vendor contract finalized amid criticism that the agency is funneling too little money to education.

The Lottery Commission on Thursday approved a seven-year contract with Rhode Island-based GTECH Corp. to provide computer gaming systems and related services.

The governor's budget office has been examining why the lottery had record sales in the latest budget year but transferred less money to schools.

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Four newly appointed Missouri Lottery Commission members say they want to make the agency more efficient so that more of its proceeds can go to education.

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Proceeds from sales of Missouri Lottery tickets have gone exclusively toward education since 1992.

vote here sign
KBIA file photo

  Missouri voters will decide whether state lottery officials should create a separate ticket to fund veterans' programs.

The Senate voted 27-4 on Thursday to send the proposal to the November general election ballot. It passed the House earlier this year.

Supporters say revenue from sales of the lottery ticket would provide a dedicated funding source for cash-strapped veterans' homes. Opponents question whether the new ticket will siphon revenue from education, which currently is the sole beneficiary of Missouri lottery proceeds.

Powerball
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri Lottery officials say one Powerball ticket sold in Missouri matched all six numbers to win the $96.5 million jackpot.

The lottery said in a release Sunday that another ticket also matched five white-ball numbers to win $1 million in Saturday's drawing. The winning numbers were: 13, 28, 31, 55, 58, and the Powerball number was 15.

The Lottery says the Missouri winners have 180 days to claim their prizes.

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The Missouri Lottery has provided a larger-than-usual payment to public education because of stronger-than-usual sales.

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The Missouri Lottery is allowing people who have a gambling problem to voluntarily ban themselves for life.

People who participate will be prohibited from claiming winnings of $600 or more. The option started Thursday, and officials say it is modeled after self-exclusion programs in Illinois, Iowa and Maryland.