missouri public service commission

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Efforts to bar Missouri payday lenders from accepting payments for utility bills have been dealt a setback.

Opponents of the practice say utility customers who pay their bills at payday lending stores are vulnerable to taking out high-interest loans at the same time.

The opponents want Missouri's Public Service Commission to ban the practice. The PSC regulates utilities.

But The Kansas City Star reports the PSC staff has concluded there's no evidence of consumers being harmed by paying utility bills at payday loan shops.

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forwardstl / flickr

Ameren Missouri is seeking approval to add about $1.50 to customers' monthly electric bills.

File photo / KBIA

State utility regulators have publicly released a confidential report detailing how much money has been earned by Ameren Missouri.

The Missouri Public Service Commission decided Tuesday to unseal a November report that has been at the heart of a complaint. The complaint alleges the St. Louis-based electric company was earning more than it was allowed to.

The newly released documents also include testimony from utility regulation consultants hired by Noranda Aluminum, which is leading the challenge of Ameren's electricity rates.

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Wal-Mart doesn't want Missouri's largest electric customer to get a lower utility bill from Ameren Missouri.

Noranda Aluminum Holding Corp. is seeking about a 25 percent reduction in the rate Ameren charges at its aluminum smelter in the southeastern Missouri town of New Madrid.

Wal-Mart filed a motion opposing the reduction Friday with the Missouri Public Service Commission, which regulates utilities.

File Photo / Ameren Missouri

Two separate complaints were filed by Noranda Aluminum against Ameren Missouri after data showed Ameren earned more than what the state allows.

scott rupp
Missouri State Senate

A Republican state senator says he expects to be appointed by the governor to Missouri's utility regulatory commission.

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Missouri utility regulators have signed off on an agreement involving Ameren Missouri over solar rebates.

Ameren Missouri asked the Public Service Commission last month for permission to suspend payment of the rebates.

The agreement approved Wednesday calls for the utility to continue the rebates up to a maximum of nearly $92 million. Ameren had paid nearly $22 million from August 2012 through October of this year.

Lance Cheung for USDA / Flickr

Missouri's largest utility, Ameren Missouri, is seeking an early halt to a solar rebate program that rewards consumers for using alternative energy sources.

Kansas City Power & Light made a similar request in July.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports Ameren Missouri is asking the Missouri Public Service Commission for permission to curtail payment of millions of dollars in solar rebates before the year's end.

The company says it has received more than $35 million in solar rebate requests, creating a financial strain.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA file photo

Gov. Jay Nixon has appointed his top legislative aide to serve on a Missouri commission that regulates utility companies.

Nixon said Friday that he had appointed Daniel Hall to the Missouri Public Service Commission.

Hall, of Columbia, has served as the governor's legislative director since Nixon took office in 2009. Before that, Hall was a senior counsel to Nixon in the attorney general's office. He also has held various other positions in state government and worked as an attorney in private practice.

Christopher S. Penn / Flickr

Ameren Missouri customers can expect to see a slightly lower bill after state regulators determined the utility owes its electric customers slightly more than $26 million for failing to include some revenue in its calculations.

The Missouri Public Service Commission approved an order Wednesday for the St. Louis-based company to refund the money to customers. But Ameren Missouri won't be sending out checks. Instead, the $26.3 million will be applied by adjusting a fuel charge that customers otherwise would pay.