missouri river

Beth Lago

Getting messy for a cause.  That's what a couple of hundred or so folks did a couple of months back when they got up early on a Saturday morning and cleaned-up a stretch of the Missouri River near Boonville.

It was one of eight major clean-ups of the Missouri River in 2014 coordinated by the Columbia-based organization Missouri River Relief. 

Facebook/Ruthie Mocchia

Have you ever been out on the Missouri River? If so, you know it is big, wide, and muddy. There's also litter in the river. Now, there's a lot less litter thanks to the work of Missouri River Relief. On this week's Thinking Out Loud, Trevor Harris talked with Melanie Cheney about why a cleaner Missouri River matters (Think drinking water.) Also, hear music from Violet Vonder Haar, who will be performing this Saturday's Boonville River Festival.


Bernt Rostad / Flickr

The amount of water released into the Missouri River is increasing after August runoff was the third highest in more than a century.

Brandon Kiley / KBIA

  The state of Missouri is hosting the longest non-stop canoe and kayak race in the world this Tuesday through Friday.

Nearly 300 paddlers participated in the Missouri River 340 (MR-340) began their journey in Kansas City, KS on Tuesday. They will travel 340 miles to St. Charles, MO to complete the race.

One of those participants, Robyn Benicasa, is a firefighter from San Diego that has been racing competitively for 20 years. Her claim to fame in the Missouri River 340 is the fact that she owns the course record for solo women.

KBIA file photo

An annual paddle boat race on the Missouri River will be postponed until August because of high water on the river.

Sen. Blunt asks corps to halt fish habitat project

Oct 10, 2013
Missouri River at Rocheport
File Photo / KBIA

U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt has added his voice to those urging the Army Corps of Engineers to halt a Missouri River project intended to create a habitat for endangered fish.

Mo. Department of Conservation opens to public input

Sep 27, 2013
Missouri Department of Conservation logo
File Photo / KBIA

The Missouri Department of Conservation recently introduced plans to include public input on designated conservation areas around the state. The new process is meant to help hikers, fishers and hunters express what they like and dislike regarding the planning and maintenance of the areas.

A new $18 million project at a St. Joseph plant uses ultraviolet lights to remove E. coli from wastewater before it goes into the Missouri River.

Officials cut the ribbon Wednesday at the UV and Effluent Pump Station Facility.

The St. Joseph News-Press reports the plant contains 972 ultraviolet lights, which kill DNA found in E. coli so it can't reproduce.

Missouri River at Rocheport
File Photo / KBIA

Nearly a dozen Missouri agriculture groups sent a letter to Governor Jay Nixon this week calling for his support to oppose a dredging project in the Missouri River.

The project – near Arrow Rock, Missouri – was set up several years ago to create a shallow water habitat for several fish species including the pallid sturgeon – an endangered fish. Under the US Army Corps of Engineers plan, the soil excavated from the site would be deposited into the Missouri River.

It's been twenty years since the Great Flood of '93 swelled the Missouri River to record-high crests.  Since then, levees have been upgraded, flood preparations improved, and in a few places, communities bought out and relocated.  St. Louis Public Radio's Marshall Griffin visited some sites along the river in central Missouri and talked to people who battled the flood waters in 1993, and who still keep an eye on the river today:

Flood of '93 in central Mo.

File / KBIA

After several days of heavy rain across the lower Missouri River basin, the amount of water released into the river is being reduced to help minimize flooding.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says it began reducing the amount of water flowing into the Missouri River on Sunday because of concerns about flooding downstream. On Sunday, the Corps decreased the amount of water being released from Gavins Point Dam, located on the South Dakota-Nebraska state line, from 24,000 cubic feet per second to 12,000 cubic feet per second.

“… that will help the peak stages on the river in some locations and also shorten the duration of the high flows,” the Corps’ Jody Farhat said.

Missouri River home to endangered pallid sturgeon

May 8, 2013
Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

The volunteer crew members pulled on their life jackets and climbed into a flat-bottomed aluminum boat at a ramp near Nebraska City, Neb. They came out early on a cold, gray April morning hoping to catch an endangered pallid sturgeon.

Step by step: One man walks across Missouri for a cause

May 2, 2013
Meredith Turk / KBIA

One St. Louis man is walking from Kansas City to St. Louis. He’s walking to share his story about a lifetime struggle with mental illness. His walk aims to raise awareness and funds for more mental health support in rural communities. 

File / KBIA

Climatologists say recent rain and snowstorms are slowly easing the grip of the worst U.S. drought in decades. But the wet weather also is creating some potential headaches.

Missouri River
KBIA

The amount of water released into the lower Missouri River will be decreased this month because warmer weather has reduced ice concerns.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said Thursday it will gradually reduce the amount of water it releases out of Gavins Point dam on the South Dakota-Nebraska border to 14,000 cubic feet per second.

That's a decrease of 4,000 cubic feet per second from the releases being made over the past two weeks.

The change is not expected to make much difference in water levels downstream in the Missouri or Mississippi rivers.

Missouri River
KBIA

After weeks of lobbying, the Army Corps of Engineers now plans to release extra water from reservoirs upstream on the Missouri River. But the releases are not for the benefit of downstream navigation on the Mississippi.

Melanie Cheney / Flickr

U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt of Missouri may seek a presidential emergency declaration in an effort to keep barges moving on the drought-riddled Mississippi River.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is considering changing how reservoir water is used along the Missouri River.

The Corps is holding a series of public meetings to get input on whether to permanently allocate some of that water for municipal and industrial uses.

What does an oil and gas boom in North Dakota have to do with Missouri River reservoirs?

Hydrofracturing – the process that gets new wells up and running – takes lots of water.

aimeeorleans / flickr

Governor Jay Nixon (D) says his administration is keeping tabs on river levels along the Missouri and Mississippi as drought conditions persist across the state.  He indicates that the Missouri River may be in worse shape.

“I think that the challenges on the Missouri are a little more significant than the Mississippi," Nixon said at a gathering Wednesday in Jefferson City.  "Minnesota has had a fair amount of rain in that part of the country, but we’re watching those issues very carefully.”

aimeeorleans / flickr

The same reservoirs in northern states that were blamed for last year's flooding on the Missouri River are now giving the river a boost during a severe drought.

Two familiar names in St. Louis construction have won a Missouri Department of Transportation contract to rebuild the Daniel Boone Bridge, which carries Interstate 64 across the Missouri River at Chesterfield.

Alberici Enterprises and Walsh Construction will start on the $125 million project in early 2013. The construction portion of the contract totals $111 million.

MoDOT director Kevin Keith called it a great day for his department and the region, saying St. Louis and St. Charles counties are getting a lot from the contract.

Clay Masters / Harvest Public Media

This week, we’ll hear about efforts to manage the Missouri River.

Clay Masters / Harvest Public Media

Along a vast stretch of the Missouri River, the floodwaters that ravished homes, businesses and farms last year are not a distant memory.

Farmers and environmentalists faced off at a hearing today in Jefferson City over a water project on the Missouri River west of Boonville.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers wants to build a new chute at Jameson Island designed to protect the pallid sturgeon and other native fish species.  Building it would involve dredging along the Missouri River, and the Corps wants to dump the sediment back into the river.  The move is strongly opposed by farm interests.  Dale Ludwig with the Missouri Soybean Association says up to a million cubic yards of sediment could be dumped into the Missouri River.

Newscast for May 29, 2012

May 29, 2012

Regional news coverage from the KBIA News room, including:

Air Force Tech. Sgt. Oscar Sanchez / US Department of Agriculture

The top military officer in charge of managing the Missouri River system says the agency needs help from states to improve its ability to predict water runoff.

A most unusual planting season

May 16, 2012
Rick Fredericksen / Iowa Public Radio

On this bright spring morning at Blackbird Bend, along the Missouri River, the scene is a little odd.  A 24-row corn planter is brushing over the tops of a stunning winter wheat crop, 12 inches high.

river
paukrus / flickr

 A report released today by the Army Corps of Engineers says that having more free space in reservoirs along the Missouri River would not have eliminated last year’s record floods.

Repeat of last year's flooding unlikely

Mar 16, 2012
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Missouri experienced record flooding last year along the Mississippi and Missouri rivers. But this year, experts say water levels are likely to return to normal.                

Flickr / USACEpublicaffairs

 

Congressman Emanuel Cleaver will be among the participants at a Missouri River meeting next month.

Pages