missouri river

Missouri River at Rocheport
File Photo / KBIA

The Coast Guard says work to clean up 100 gallons of diesel fuel in the Missouri River is complete.

A towing vessel released the diesel fuel Monday after a fuel tank ruptured. A boom was placed around the vessel to contain the leaked fuel.

The Coast Guard said in a news release that the fuel was successfully cleaned up Tuesday. About 3,000 gallons of an oily-water mixture were removed from the river.

The spill was not expected to damage the environment. The Coast Guard said an investigation into what caused the tank to rupture is continuing.

KBIA file photo

Authorities say 100 gallons of diesel fuel has spilled into the Missouri River near Kansas City.

The Coast Guard said in a news release that the spill happened Monday night when a towing vessel's fuel tank ruptured.

A boom has been placed around the vessel to contain the discharged fuel. The release says the Coast Guard will continue to monitor the situation until the fuel is removed from the water.

KBIA file photo

The amount of water being released from dams along the Missouri River has been cut to help reduce the risk of flooding downstream after recent heavy rains.

Missouri River Relief

Missouri River Relief is a Columbia-based non-profit that has made a name for itself using volunteers to clean up trash - lots of trash - along the Big Muddy. Late last year, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awarded the group an Environmental Education Grant. River relief staff Kristen Schulte and Steve Schnarr discussed plans for the award on a recent episode of Thinking Out Loud.

KBIA file photo

Rivers across Missouri are on the rise following recent heavy rains.

KBIA file photo

The Diana Bend Conservation Area is seeing a fish die-off this fall after a summer of the Missouri River flooding. The Missouri River has expanded into its flood plains throughout the state. Now as the river recedes this fall, fish are left behind cut off from the river.

Port KC, the organization in charge of riverfront development in Kansas City, has an ambitious plan for the south bank of the Missouri River. 

For Michael Collins, the group's president and C.E.O, the idea of another park on the river isn't enough.

"We want to see what we can do to push the needle or do better than other riverfront communities across the country," says Collins.

File Photo / KBIA

  Rivers are rising throughout Missouri, and with more rainfall in the forecast, moderate flooding is now expected at several locations.

Both the Missouri and Mississippi rivers are overflowing their banks, due to heavy rain that has settled over the central U.S. over the past several days.

Butch Dye of the National Weather Service office in St. Louis said Monday that more rain is in the forecast for much of southwestern and eastern Missouri through the week. Up to 7 inches of rain could fall by the weekend, potentially making flooding even worse.

The Missouri River's nickname, which evokes a wide current of mud, misses its aesthetic potential. Its most famous admirer may be the Missouri painter George Caleb Bingham.

David Sapp

The Booneslick Trail was a pathway for westward migration in the years before Missouri statehood. In this episode of Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege talks with local historian David Sapp about the origins of the trail, how it helped form a boomtown and the local effort to keep the vestiges of the Booneslick Trail from disappearing under the plow or from being developed.

Intersection / KBIA

Singer-songwriter Lee Ruth arrived in Columbia in 1962. In this week's Thinking Out Loud, self-described 'old guy' Lee Ruth discusses his musical influences, former students of whom he is especially proud and and what makes the Mid-Missouri music scene special. 

Beth Lago

Getting messy for a cause.  That's what a couple of hundred or so folks did a couple of months back when they got up early on a Saturday morning and cleaned-up a stretch of the Missouri River near Boonville.

It was one of eight major clean-ups of the Missouri River in 2014 coordinated by the Columbia-based organization Missouri River Relief. 

Facebook/Ruthie Mocchia

Have you ever been out on the Missouri River? If so, you know it is big, wide, and muddy. There's also litter in the river. Now, there's a lot less litter thanks to the work of Missouri River Relief. On this week's Thinking Out Loud, Trevor Harris talked with Melanie Cheney about why a cleaner Missouri River matters (Think drinking water.) Also, hear music from Violet Vonder Haar, who will be performing this Saturday's Boonville River Festival.

Bernt Rostad / Flickr

The amount of water released into the Missouri River is increasing after August runoff was the third highest in more than a century.

Brandon Kiley / KBIA

  The state of Missouri is hosting the longest non-stop canoe and kayak race in the world this Tuesday through Friday.

Nearly 300 paddlers participated in the Missouri River 340 (MR-340) began their journey in Kansas City, KS on Tuesday. They will travel 340 miles to St. Charles, MO to complete the race.

One of those participants, Robyn Benicasa, is a firefighter from San Diego that has been racing competitively for 20 years. Her claim to fame in the Missouri River 340 is the fact that she owns the course record for solo women.

KBIA file photo

An annual paddle boat race on the Missouri River will be postponed until August because of high water on the river.

Sen. Blunt asks corps to halt fish habitat project

Oct 10, 2013
Missouri River at Rocheport
File Photo / KBIA

U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt has added his voice to those urging the Army Corps of Engineers to halt a Missouri River project intended to create a habitat for endangered fish.

Mo. Department of Conservation opens to public input

Sep 27, 2013
Missouri Department of Conservation logo
File Photo / KBIA

The Missouri Department of Conservation recently introduced plans to include public input on designated conservation areas around the state. The new process is meant to help hikers, fishers and hunters express what they like and dislike regarding the planning and maintenance of the areas.

A new $18 million project at a St. Joseph plant uses ultraviolet lights to remove E. coli from wastewater before it goes into the Missouri River.

Officials cut the ribbon Wednesday at the UV and Effluent Pump Station Facility.

The St. Joseph News-Press reports the plant contains 972 ultraviolet lights, which kill DNA found in E. coli so it can't reproduce.

Missouri River at Rocheport
File Photo / KBIA

Nearly a dozen Missouri agriculture groups sent a letter to Governor Jay Nixon this week calling for his support to oppose a dredging project in the Missouri River.

The project – near Arrow Rock, Missouri – was set up several years ago to create a shallow water habitat for several fish species including the pallid sturgeon – an endangered fish. Under the US Army Corps of Engineers plan, the soil excavated from the site would be deposited into the Missouri River.

It's been twenty years since the Great Flood of '93 swelled the Missouri River to record-high crests.  Since then, levees have been upgraded, flood preparations improved, and in a few places, communities bought out and relocated.  St. Louis Public Radio's Marshall Griffin visited some sites along the river in central Missouri and talked to people who battled the flood waters in 1993, and who still keep an eye on the river today:

Flooding damages north Jefferson City & triggers buyout of Cedar City

File / KBIA

After several days of heavy rain across the lower Missouri River basin, the amount of water released into the river is being reduced to help minimize flooding.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says it began reducing the amount of water flowing into the Missouri River on Sunday because of concerns about flooding downstream. On Sunday, the Corps decreased the amount of water being released from Gavins Point Dam, located on the South Dakota-Nebraska state line, from 24,000 cubic feet per second to 12,000 cubic feet per second.

“… that will help the peak stages on the river in some locations and also shorten the duration of the high flows,” the Corps’ Jody Farhat said.

Missouri River home to endangered pallid sturgeon

May 8, 2013
Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

The volunteer crew members pulled on their life jackets and climbed into a flat-bottomed aluminum boat at a ramp near Nebraska City, Neb. They came out early on a cold, gray April morning hoping to catch an endangered pallid sturgeon.

Step by step: One man walks across Missouri for a cause

May 2, 2013
Meredith Turk / KBIA

One St. Louis man is walking from Kansas City to St. Louis. He’s walking to share his story about a lifetime struggle with mental illness. His walk aims to raise awareness and funds for more mental health support in rural communities. 

File / KBIA

Climatologists say recent rain and snowstorms are slowly easing the grip of the worst U.S. drought in decades. But the wet weather also is creating some potential headaches.

Missouri River

The amount of water released into the lower Missouri River will be decreased this month because warmer weather has reduced ice concerns.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said Thursday it will gradually reduce the amount of water it releases out of Gavins Point dam on the South Dakota-Nebraska border to 14,000 cubic feet per second.

That's a decrease of 4,000 cubic feet per second from the releases being made over the past two weeks.

The change is not expected to make much difference in water levels downstream in the Missouri or Mississippi rivers.

Missouri River

After weeks of lobbying, the Army Corps of Engineers now plans to release extra water from reservoirs upstream on the Missouri River. But the releases are not for the benefit of downstream navigation on the Mississippi.

Melanie Cheney / Flickr

U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt of Missouri may seek a presidential emergency declaration in an effort to keep barges moving on the drought-riddled Mississippi River.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is considering changing how reservoir water is used along the Missouri River.

The Corps is holding a series of public meetings to get input on whether to permanently allocate some of that water for municipal and industrial uses.

What does an oil and gas boom in North Dakota have to do with Missouri River reservoirs?

Hydrofracturing – the process that gets new wells up and running – takes lots of water.