Missouri Senate

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Missouri public K-12 schools appear set to get roughly $48 million more in basic aid next fiscal year.

Senators voted 19-14 on Tuesday in favor of bumping up funding to meet targets called for under state law.

Because House members also passed a proposed budget that would meet funding goals, the money for schools likely will be locked into the final budget due May 5.

Senators were split on whether to give the extra money to K-12 schools while state revenues are lagging.

Senate floor at the Missouri Capitol
File / KBIA

JEFFERSON CITY -- Missouri Senate budgeters have approved a plan to make cuts to in-home and nursing care for disabled residents while slightly increasing money for public K-12 schools.

The Senate Appropriations Committee on Thursday passed its version of a budget for the next fiscal year beginning in July.

The budget proposal would cut in-home and nursing care by requiring people to show more severe disabilities to qualify, although the cuts are not as deep as what Gov. Eric Greitens initially recommended.

REAL ID Sits in Missouri Senate

Feb 28, 2017
Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

In 2018, Missourians may have a harder time boarding flights and entering federal buildings using their driver’s license.

Missouri is one of five states that does not comply with REAL ID, the 2005 federal law that requires states to administer stricter standards for distributing state identification like driver’s licenses.


File / KBIA

The Missouri Senate has given initial approval for legislation establishing a prescription drug monitoring program.

Senators on Wednesday voted 20-13 to create a database that tracks when prescriptions for controlled substances are written and filed. The goal of such programs is to prevent people from going to multiple doctors to get prescriptions for drugs such as painkillers — sometimes known as "doctor shopping."

Missouri is the only state that doesn't have such a system.

JEFFERSON CITY (AP) — A Missouri Democratic lawmaker is proposing a bill to make donations for gubernatorial inaugurations public records.

Liberty Rep. Mark Ellebracht in a Thursday statement criticized Republican Gov. Eric Greitens' decision to keep secret the cost of his privately funded January celebration.

Greitens did release a list of "benefactors," including Anheuser-Busch, Boeing, Express Scripts, General Motors, Monsanto and Wal-Mart.

Greitens spokesman Parker Briden declined to comment.

j.stephenconn / flickr

 

Missouri senators have taken the final step to deny pay raises for themselves and other elected officials.

Senators voted 25-2 against the raises late Monday. They had until Wednesday to act.

The vote came after Republican Gov. Eric Greitens put pressure on lawmakers to oppose the raise, which prompted a prickly response from some senators.

Republican Sen. Paul Wieland described Greitens' tactic as intimidation and said he felt insulted.

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

  Prosecutors are moving forward with a case against 23 clergy members involved in a 2014 protest of the Missouri Senate.

Authorities charged the clergy with obstructing government operations and first-degree trespassing after they and a few hundred others protested lawmakers’ refusal to expand Obamacare two years ago. 

Protesters had filled the Senate’s public galleries, chanted and sang before the police arrested 23 of the 100 protestors and clergy members.

David Shane / Flickr

A former GOP gubernatorial candidate and a conservative talk radio host are among those who will review the University of Missouri following turmoil last fall.

The University of Missouri fell under scrutiny after student protests in Columbia over what some saw as administrators' indifference to racial issues.

Lawmakers frustrated over how the protests were handled created the UM System Review Commission to review system policies and administrative structure. The eight-member commission will recommend changes.

Senate floor at the Missouri Capitol
File / KBIA

A Missouri Senate staffer has begun reviewing Planned Parenthood's internal records, including procedures for fetal tissue disposal.

Jason Rojas / Flickr

A bill moving through the Missouri Legislature would limit public access to police body camera footage.

missouri capitol
Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Restaurants wouldn't have to pay sales and use taxes on electricity and other utilities used to prepare food under a measure headed to the Missouri Senate.

j.stephenconn / flickr

The state Senate has approved a proposal designed to lure large conventions to Missouri.

Camille Phillips / KBIA

Missouri would pay testing fees for residents taking a high school equivalency test for the first time under a proposal that has won initial approval in the state Senate.

Frustrated Missouri Democrats Delay Senate

Mar 10, 2016
state capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

Democrats are slowing down work in the Missouri Senate after Republicans broke up a 37-hour filibuster. 

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

After a record-breaking 39-hour filibuster attempt, the Missouri Senate has passed a bill on a proposal amending the Missouri Constitution to provide further religious protections for those objecting to gay marriage.

David Shane / Flickr

Missouri Senate leaders have decided to delay moving the news media off the chamber floor because of cost concerns.

David Shane / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY - A state senator running for attorney general wants Missouri to expand its "stand your ground" laws to make it easier for people to use deadly force in self-defense.

Sen. Kurt Schaefer told a senate panel Wednesday that people should be able to do whatever it takes to defend themselves without worrying about a lawsuit afterward.

David Shane / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY - The Missouri Supreme Court is considering a claim that state senators violated the Sunshine Law by barring some people from taking videos at committee meetings.

The court heard arguments Wednesday in a case brought by Progress Missouri. The liberal group was denied permission to record videos in four Senate committee hearings last February and March.

Its lawsuit claims the Senate violated the open-meeting requirements of the state Sunshine Law.

File Photo / KBIA

A newly filed piece of legislation that would protect the first amendment rights of student journalists in Missouri public schools and colleges is making its way through the State House. Abby Kempf is a senior at Rock Bridge high school, and one of the editors-in-chief of the school’s journalism program.


Brandon Bartoszek / Flickr

 

JEFFERSON CITY - The Missouri Senate has given initial approval to a bill changing how medical expenses are handled in court cases.

The Senate's endorsement Wednesday came after Democrats staged an all-night filibuster that dragged out a debate that began Tuesday.

The bill would require the actual costs — not the value of medical treatment for plaintiffs — to be considered as evidence in civil lawsuits.

Fibonacci Blue / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY - Michael Brown's family is urging Missouri lawmakers to overcome politics and pass a law requiring police to wear body cameras.

Brown's mother told a Senate panel Wednesday that body cameras are only one piece of police reform, but would help restore trust. A body cameras proposal failed last year.

The bill would require police in Missouri's largest cities to record all official interactions. Departments would store the footage for two years, and the public would have access to it as they do incident reports.

Afternoon Newscast for February 10, 2016

Feb 10, 2016

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:


Danielle Kellog / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY - A Senate panel is considering four bills that would change Missouri's laws on texting while driving, seatbelts and motorcycle helmets.

One bill reviewed in a hearing Wednesday would require everyone in a car to wear a seatbelt, including adults in the backseat who are currently exempt from seatbelt requirements.

Two other proposals would ban texting while driving, which currently is forbidden for commercial drivers and people younger than 22.

vote here sign
KBIA file photo

Two proposals aimed at requiring Missourians to show photo ID before voting are heading to the Senate floor.

Missouri Senate discussing concealed weapons on college campuses

Jan 27, 2016
Jimmy Emerson, DVM / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY — Missouri lawmakers have begun discussing whether to allow concealed weapons on college campuses.

A Senate committee began hearing testimony Wednesday on a bill that would only allow campuses to ban concealed weapons if the school posts armed guards and metal detectors at every entrance to every campus building.

Other bills in the House and Senate would also expand access to guns on campuses.

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