Missouri Senate

Senate floor at the Missouri Capitol
File / KBIA

A Missouri Senate staffer has begun reviewing Planned Parenthood's internal records, including procedures for fetal tissue disposal.

Jason Rojas / Flickr

A bill moving through the Missouri Legislature would limit public access to police body camera footage.

missouri capitol
Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Restaurants wouldn't have to pay sales and use taxes on electricity and other utilities used to prepare food under a measure headed to the Missouri Senate.

j.stephenconn / flickr

The state Senate has approved a proposal designed to lure large conventions to Missouri.

Camille Phillips / KBIA

Missouri would pay testing fees for residents taking a high school equivalency test for the first time under a proposal that has won initial approval in the state Senate.

Frustrated Missouri Democrats Delay Senate

Mar 10, 2016
state capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

Democrats are slowing down work in the Missouri Senate after Republicans broke up a 37-hour filibuster. 

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

After a record-breaking 39-hour filibuster attempt, the Missouri Senate has passed a bill on a proposal amending the Missouri Constitution to provide further religious protections for those objecting to gay marriage.

David Shane / Flickr

Missouri Senate leaders have decided to delay moving the news media off the chamber floor because of cost concerns.

David Shane / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY - A state senator running for attorney general wants Missouri to expand its "stand your ground" laws to make it easier for people to use deadly force in self-defense.

Sen. Kurt Schaefer told a senate panel Wednesday that people should be able to do whatever it takes to defend themselves without worrying about a lawsuit afterward.

David Shane / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY - The Missouri Supreme Court is considering a claim that state senators violated the Sunshine Law by barring some people from taking videos at committee meetings.

The court heard arguments Wednesday in a case brought by Progress Missouri. The liberal group was denied permission to record videos in four Senate committee hearings last February and March.

Its lawsuit claims the Senate violated the open-meeting requirements of the state Sunshine Law.

File Photo / KBIA

A newly filed piece of legislation that would protect the first amendment rights of student journalists in Missouri public schools and colleges is making its way through the State House. Abby Kempf is a senior at Rock Bridge high school, and one of the editors-in-chief of the school’s journalism program.


Brandon Bartoszek / Flickr

 

JEFFERSON CITY - The Missouri Senate has given initial approval to a bill changing how medical expenses are handled in court cases.

The Senate's endorsement Wednesday came after Democrats staged an all-night filibuster that dragged out a debate that began Tuesday.

The bill would require the actual costs — not the value of medical treatment for plaintiffs — to be considered as evidence in civil lawsuits.

Fibonacci Blue / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY - Michael Brown's family is urging Missouri lawmakers to overcome politics and pass a law requiring police to wear body cameras.

Brown's mother told a Senate panel Wednesday that body cameras are only one piece of police reform, but would help restore trust. A body cameras proposal failed last year.

The bill would require police in Missouri's largest cities to record all official interactions. Departments would store the footage for two years, and the public would have access to it as they do incident reports.

Afternoon Newscast for February 10, 2016

Feb 10, 2016

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including:


Danielle Kellog / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY - A Senate panel is considering four bills that would change Missouri's laws on texting while driving, seatbelts and motorcycle helmets.

One bill reviewed in a hearing Wednesday would require everyone in a car to wear a seatbelt, including adults in the backseat who are currently exempt from seatbelt requirements.

Two other proposals would ban texting while driving, which currently is forbidden for commercial drivers and people younger than 22.

vote here sign
KBIA file photo

Two proposals aimed at requiring Missourians to show photo ID before voting are heading to the Senate floor.

Missouri Senate discussing concealed weapons on college campuses

Jan 27, 2016
Jimmy Emerson, DVM / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY — Missouri lawmakers have begun discussing whether to allow concealed weapons on college campuses.

A Senate committee began hearing testimony Wednesday on a bill that would only allow campuses to ban concealed weapons if the school posts armed guards and metal detectors at every entrance to every campus building.

Other bills in the House and Senate would also expand access to guns on campuses.

gavel
Flickr / steakpinball

The Missouri Senate has passed a bill that would add requirements for expert witnesses' testimony.

Senators voted 20-10 in favor of the bill Thursday. It now heads to the House.

Members of the news media who regularly cover the Missouri Senate will soon be doing so from another location.

The Senate voted 26-4 Thursday to bar members of the press from the floor of the Senate, including use of a table that has been reserved for reporters for decades.  The new rule takes effect March 29.

It appears that Republican leaders in the Missouri House and Senate are putting their money where their mouths are when it comes to ethics changes.

During his opening speech, House Speaker Todd Richardson, R-Poplar Bluff, said he'll refer all ethics bills to committee on Thursday, a move that often takes place days, weeks, and sometimes months after the start of a legislative session.

Ron Richard is about to spend his first full session as president pro-tem of the Missouri Senate.

He was elected to the post by his colleagues in September after Tom Dempsey resigned a year ahead of time, and shepherded the upper chamber through veto session. The Republican from Joplin also served as House Speaker from 2009 to 2010, and is the only elected official in Missouri history to lead both chambers.

Richard sat down recently with St. Louis Public Radio’s Marshall Griffin and talked about what he hopes to accomplish, and about getting started as president pro-tem:

As of today, there are 92 new laws on the books in Missouri.

All of them were passed by the Missouri House and Senate during the 2015 regular session, and all but two were signed by Governor Jay Nixon.  Lawmakers passed Senate Bill 24 by overriding Nixon's veto.  The new law shortens the lifetime eligibility for welfare recipients in Missouri from five years to three years and nine months.  Although most of the provisions in SB24 officially takes effect today, the shorter eligibility period won't kick in until January 1st, 2016.

On this week’s episode of Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s political journo-duo – Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies – welcome state Auditor Nicole Galloway to the program for the first time.

The Democratic official was appointed to statewide office earlier this year after the death of state Auditor Tom Schweich. Before taking the reins, Galloway was in her first full term as Boone County’s treasurer.

Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

  A former spokeswoman for various causes backed by conservative donor Rex Sinquefield has been hired as the communications director for the Missouri Senate.

Missouri House of Representatives

A Missouri state senator has left his credit union job following allegations that he made unwanted sexual advances toward Capitol interns. 

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