missouri veterans

Beatriz Costa-Lima / KBIA

Welcome Home is a transitional emergency and service center for veterans. The organization has been operating in Columbia for more than 25 years, and recently expanded. The mission? To reduce veteran homelessness by helping people gain housing, services and skills to form stable lives. 

Intersection's Sara Shahriari sat down with Timothy Rich, the executive director of Welcome Home, to learn about the organization and its new facilities.


Rebecca Smith / KBIA

“I figured there are only about 25 people that know me.”

Columbia resident Mr. Ferrill Purdy was clearly overwhelmed by the number of people who had come to hear about his life and military service, and see one of the planes he flew in combat during WWII take to the skies over town this past October.

Local organizations are working on ways to increase access to mental health services for veterans in mid-Missouri. Friday, the Harry S. Truman Hospital hosted a Veteran Affairs Mental Health and Homeless Summit. L. Stephen Gairth of the Public Affairs Office at the Hospital said this has become an annual event.

Representatives from The Salvation Army, The Missouri Department of Mental Health and other local veteran agencies came together to discuss mental health in the veteran community. In total, about 50 people were in attendance for the summit.

“It really creates an environment where we can build on the existing partnership and really enhance the engagement that we have with those state and local organizations,” said Gairth.

Missouri's contest for the U.S. Senate between Democrat Jason Kander and Republican Roy Blunt is getting more national attention - and money.

Washington is abuzz about Kander's new TV ad, which shows him assembling an assault weapon blindfolded. Aside from being creative, the ad also highlights the key roles of guns and the military in both campaigns.

Outside groups are running attack ads the claim Blunt hasn't done enough for veterans, while the NRA is accusing Kander of being soft on gun rights.

Missouri Capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

House members have voted unanimously to make changes to the Missouri Returning Heroes' Education Act to cap tuition for veterans who enlisted after Sept. 11, 2001, at $50 per credit hour.

Veterans' homes across Missouri are about to get some much-needed upgrades.

Gov. Jay Nixon traveled to the veterans' home at St. James Friday where he told residents, staff and their families that their facility will soon be getting a $6.9 million upgrade.

World War I Veterans
File Photo / KBIA

  A constitutional amendment that aims to construct a new veteran’s nursing home is moving through the Missouri House. The House gave its initial approval on Wednesday, April 29. 

The measure would give Missouri voters the ability to decide on the creation of new bonds that would pay for the construction of this new home. Those bonds could total up to $50 million, which is the estimated cost of the project.

A plan to use up to $50 million in bonds to fund a new home for veterans in Missouri may head to Missouri voters to decide.

The Missouri House on Wednesday gave initial approval to a measure that would send voters a constitutional amendment to approve new bonds to pay for construction of a new veteran's home.

missouri house floor
File photo / KBIA

A Missouri Republican wants to see bonds approved by voters used to fund a new nursing home for veterans in order to reduce a 2,000-person waiting list.

The measure sponsored by Rep. Lindell Shumake, of Hannibal, is scheduled for a House committee hearing Monday.

Nixon plans improvements to veterans' services

Jan 27, 2015
Missouri Veterans Commission

  Governor Jay Nixon told a packed room of Missouri veterans that he's working to make sure the state's veterans’ homes will continue to serve their needs.

The governor said he's not only committed to renovating four of the state's existing veterans homes but also wants to secure funds to build a new home for those still looking for care.

"For every veteran receiving quality medical care and services at one of our veterans' homes, there's a veteran on a waiting list because there's not enough space," Nixon said.