missouri

brady deaton
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

Brady Deaton, University of Missouri chancellor emeritus has been honored with a 2014 Missourian Award according to a press release from the MU News Bureau. The Missourian Award honors the state’s most outstanding citizens who have had a significant impact on their community and on the state’s vitality.

The New York Times

  The New York Times this week ran a series of editorials calling on the federal government to repeal the ban on marijuana.  A brave, game-changing move that shows the country's leading newspaper acting like one, or just another sign of how behind public opinion the mainstream media are these days?  And what difference will it make?

The Editorial Board, The New York Times, "Repeal Prohibition, Again"

For the fourth time this year, an inmate's lethal injection did not go as planned. Last night, it was Arizona, but the state has company.

An Ohio inmate took 25 minutes to die in January. In Oklahoma, there were two apparent botches: In one,  an inmate said, "I feel my whole body burning," and in another, the prisoner took more than 40 minutes to die.

But Arizona's execution took even longer. Joseph Wood's execution began at 1:52 p.m., and he died nearly two hours later at 3:49 p.m.

Roman Boed / Flickr

  While Western media have for days been focusing on Russian-backed separatists as the culprits behind the missile attack on MH 17 over eastern Ukraine, the people of Russia have been hearing different stories from their government-controlled media.

stephenconn / Flickr

Gov. Jay Nixon has signed legislation that enacts performance-based funding for Missouri's public universities and community colleges.

 Around 50 people rallied at the State Capitol Thursday against a proposed constitutional amendment to limit regulations on farmers and ranchers in Missouri.

Opponents of the "Right to Farm" ballot measure say state law already protects farmers and ranchers, and the proposal is really geared toward protecting corporations that engage in large-scale farming and animal-producing operations.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon announced Thursday that 21 Missouri organizations will receive $4,232,627 in AmeriCorps funding from the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS).

Jay Nixon
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has signed legislation requiring anyone younger than 17 to have written parental consent to use a booth, bed or other tanning device at a business.

President Barack Obama has appointed St. Louis attorney Kevin O'Malley as U.S. ambassador to Ireland.

Lina Young / KBIA

A commemorative art exhibit made its first stop in Fulton, Mo., on May 30. The National Churchill Museum at Westminster College presented its new exhibit “D-Day Normandy: Operation Overlord” in remembrance of the 70th anniversary of D-Day.

Backers of a proposed constitutional amendment to limit regulations on farmers and ranchers in Missouri continue to tour the state this week.

gavel
Flickr / steakpinball

Missouri's attorney general says the state should establish its own laboratory to produce chemicals for use in executions rather than rely on an "uneasy cooperation" with medical professionals and pharmaceutical companies.

Smoking
File Photo / KBIA

A judge has rejected a request to delay a smoking ban in St. Joseph while a civil lawsuit opposing the ban is considered in court.

money
File Photo

On College Savings Day, Missouri State Treasurer Clint Zweifel announced that over 10,000 people have signed up for a chance to win $5,290 for contribution into an account with MOST, Missouri’s 529 College Savings Plan. Zweifel said the giveaway is a great way to raise awareness of the importance of investing for future higher education expenses from an early age.

machinecodeblue via Flickr

Missouri's environmental regulators already are making plans to respond to new federal regulations on emissions from coal-fired power plants.

KOMU News

 The Missouri legislature passed a resolution to establish a Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Task Force on May 6.

According to the resolution, Missouri lawmakers created the task force to “identify and address the unmet needs of persons with MS.”

Among many issues, the task force will be looking at MS treatments for Missourians.  Medical expenses for a person with MS can reach almost $70,000 per year. Access to these treatments can also be a concern.

Kellie Moore, ColumbiaFAVS.com

When Lauren Wieland graduated from eighth grade this month, there were 3 students in her graduating class.

  She was one of 32 students attending Zion Lutheran School, a two-room schoolhouse in Lone Elm, near Boonville.

When the school opened in 1896, it had only one room. It turns out, there are many one-room schoolhouses that still dot the landscape of rural Missouri today.

In the 1960s, Zion Lutheran got its second classroom. That’s also when the school got bathrooms – until then, it had old-fashioned outhouses.

ambulance
Creative Commons / Flickr

The Missouri State Highway Patrol says a 19-year-old man drowned in a northwest Missouri river.

A disappearing German dialect still spoken in Missouri

Apr 15, 2014

KBIA producer Ryan Schuessler visited with Terry Loehnig, a Missouri native who runs a farm outside McKittrick, Mo. Loehnig's parents and grandparents were born in or near Hermann, Mo., and he grew up learning a regional dialect of German at home called Hermanndeutsch. It's a mixture of Low and High German, and English.

These days, it's hard to find anyone who speaks Hermanndeutsch, and the dialect is quickly becoming a distant memory.

fbi
cliff1066 / Flickr

  Federal investigators are looking into questions about a northwest Missouri school district's finances.

missouri capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

A Missouri House Democrat has introduced legislation that would repeal the state's ban on gay marriage.

Mike Colona, a House member from St. Louis who is gay, filed a proposed constitutional amendment this week that would go before voters in November. Colona was joined by 30 of his Democratic colleagues as co-sponsors.

For all intents and purposes, the 2014 election season looks to be a great, big bust.

Nobody should be surprised, as 2014 was always a way station to 2016. But hardly anybody expected that the only statewide race on the ballot would feature state Auditor Tom Schweich facing off against a Libertarian or Constitution Party candidate -- but not even a token Democrat. And some previously heated state Senate contests completely fizzled out.

Our Abbie Fentress Swanson (second from left) reported stories while hip-deep in water and on the road across the Midwest.
Abbie Fentress Swanson/Harvest Public Media

When I was offered this job nearly two years ago, I jumped at the opportunity to move to Columbia, Mo., from Brooklyn, N.Y., to cover agriculture and food production in the Heartland.

Missouri Capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

A proposed truce in the Kansas City business battle between Missouri and Kansas has gained another endorsement in Missouri.

jcarlosn / Flickr

An Iowa company has pleaded guilty to federal charges stemming from the release of thousands of gallons of gasoline-contaminated water into a sewer system in southwest Missouri.

mamtek
Kristofor Husted / KBIA

A federal judge has ruled that the city of Moberly, Mo., and its industrial development authority are not responsible for bonds involved in a failed artificial sweetener plant project.

St. Louis Arch
paparutzi / Flickr

The number of missing or destroyed military records at a federal government warehouse in St. Louis is significantly larger than initially believed.

Western Governors University-Missouri students are now eligible for the Access Missouri grant.

Only one Missourian has ever been President of the United States, and Harry Truman used to keep a sign on his desk that read “The buck stops here.” 

Missouri revenues have grown by slightly less than 3 percent through the first half of the state's budget year.

Figures released Thursday by the state Office of Administration show Missouri's general revenues stood at nearly $3.9 billion at the end of December. That was up more than $100 million from the same period a year earlier — a growth rate of 2.8 percent.

Missouri's 2014 fiscal year began last July and ends this coming June 30.

Pages