monsanto

Monsanto will continue selling soybean seeds coated with pesticides that have been linked to honey bee deaths, even though the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency found the seeds do not improve yields.

The seeds in question are treated with a class of chemicals called neonicotinoids, which are chemically similar to nicotine.

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stevecadman / Flickr

A federal judge has denied a motion for a new trial from a north Mississippi company sued by Missouri-based Monsanto for saving seeds from one harvest and planting them the following season.

U.S. District Judge Michael Mills ruled this week that Mitchell and Eddie Scruggs owe Monsanto Co. $6.3 million damages as a jury found in 2010. Prejudgment interest dating back to 2000 has increased the amount to $8.9 million.

Monsanto breaking ground on Chesterfield project

Oct 22, 2013
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stevecadman / Flickr

A $400 million expansion announced by Monsanto in April is starting in earnest with a ceremonial groundbreaking at the Chesterfield research center site.

The agricultural products company says it expects to bring 675 new jobs to the region over the next three years.

Gov. Jay Nixon was scheduled to join Monsanto officials at the ceremony Tuesday, just as he did when the company first unveiled the project at an international biotechnology conference in Chicago.

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stevecadman / Flickr

 

Monsanto says its financial loss widened in the agribusiness giant's fiscal fourth quarter as sales of biotech seeds dropped.

Grace Hood / KUNC

When unapproved genetically modified wheat was found growing in Oregon earlier this year, it didn’t take long for accusations about how it ended up there to start flying. A flurry of initial finger-pointing cast potential blame on a federal seed vault in Fort Collins, Colo., which housed the same strain of wheat, developed by Monsanto Corp., for about seven years up until late 2011.

Hazel Motes / flickr

 

 

Missouri state appeals court has ruled that a jury should decide whether a former subsidiary of Monsanto that manufactured toxic chemicals is responsible for illnesses caused by the widespread use of those chemicals in everyday products.

Who wants biotech wheat?

Jul 3, 2013
Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

Many farmers say they would like to grow genetically engineered wheat to help them feed a hungry world, but it’s not what everyone’s hungry for. And now, with the mysterious appearance of Roundup Ready wheat in a farmer’s field in Oregon a few weeks ago, consumer resistance may grow even stronger.

Most of the corn and soybeans grown in the United States are genetically modified, but GMO wheat has never been approved for farming.

A Monsanto researcher is one of the winners of the 2013 World Food Prize.

Monsanto Chief Technology Officer Robert Fraley will share the international honor with Mary-Dell Chilton of Syngenta and Belgian plant scientist Marc Van Montagu.

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stevecadman / Flickr

The Boone County Fire Department and the food pantry in Sturgeon both received unexpected $2,500 donations this week. 

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stevecadman / Flickr

Monsanto Co. plans a $400 million expansion at its suburban St. Louis research center that could add 675 jobs over the next three years.

Seed companies fight to maintain independence

Apr 18, 2013
Bill Wheelhouse / Harvest Public Media

The window in Tom Burrus’ office gives him a good look at the wide expanse of Illinois River bottomland where his company produces seed corn for farmers across Illinois, Missouri, Iowa and Wisconsin.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

This week, we’ll hear from Harvest Public Media’s Science of the Seed Series.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

Coming up we’ll kick off a three-part series from Harvest Public Media on the Science of the Seed. For the introductory report, Amy Mayer explores the origins of gene transformation.

But let’s first start in Columbia where as of February, landlords are required to maintain a list of all tenants. It’s part of a new occupancy limitation disclosure ordinance recently passed by the City Council. KBIA’s Andrew Yost reports that the ordinance deals with several overcrowding issues concerning neighbors.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

The vast majority of the corn and soybeans in United States grow from seeds that have been genetically modified. The technology is barely 30 years old and the controversy surrounding it somewhat younger. But how did it even become possible?

Photo courtesy University of Illinois / Read more: http://bulletin.ipm.illinois.edu/article.php?id=1569

This week: Rootworm is causing a headache for some farmers who thought they already had a fix for that problem. Plus, a university of Missouri study takes a look at the impact economic strains have on middle class families.