Ongoing Coverage:

my farm roots

Arts and Culture
1:34 pm
Fri August 3, 2012

My Farm Roots: Just taking notes

Tom Karst feels right at home on a summer morning at a farmer's market in Overland Park, Kan.
Donna Vestal Harvest Public Media

Sometimes farm roots don’t blossom into a farm life.

But those memories can still have a huge influence, perhaps even determining a career choice.

That’s the case for Tom Karst, a soft-spoken, well-respected journalist who’s been covering the fruit and vegetable industry for more than 25 years.

Read more
Agriculture
1:32 pm
Fri July 27, 2012

My Farm Roots: Making a home, out on the ranch

Nan Gardiner (front) with her husband Henry in Ashland, Kan.
Peggy Lowe Harvest Public Media

It’s not every day that a trip to the drug store can change your destiny.

For 20-year-old Nan Arnold, it was a day in 1956 in Ashland, a small, dusty dot on the open range of western Kansas near the Oklahoma border.

Nan had landed her first job as a music teacher at the Ashland school just a year before. She lived with the store’s owner because her parents thought she was too young to live alone.  

Read more
Agriculture
3:39 pm
Fri July 20, 2012

My Farm Roots: When you hail from farm country, roots run deep

Kate Edwards grew up helping her grandfather on his farm. Those memories are part of what spurred her to start her own farm.
Andrea Silenzi Harvest Public Media

This is the first installment of My Farm Roots, Harvest Public Media’s new series chronicling Americans’ connection to the land.

Kate Edwards hasn’t always been a farmer. No, she came back to the farm after college, grad school and a stint as an environmental engineer.

Now, she farms a small one-acre plot near Solon, Iowa. On her small farm, she feeds 30 families through a Community Supported Agriculture project, a CSA. Edwards was drawn back to farming, she says, because of family memories.

Read more
Agriculture
5:53 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

The lasting heritage of the Homestead Act

Kendall Hodgson, left, and Ed Hodgson, first cousins, in front of the Hodgson homestead near Little River, Kan.
Peggy Lowe Harvest Public Media

LITTLE RIVER, Kan. – Before this town was here, before the railroads were here, before a post office was here, the Hodgsons were here.

In 1871, Hannah and Henry Clay Hodgson moved into a one-room dugout on the banks of the Little Arkansas, their view an Indian camp on the other side of the river. They arrived in central Kansas in November, in the midst of a blizzard, and it took them three days from the train stop in Salina to get the 60 miles south to this outpost.

Read more

Pages