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Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media/KBIA

 

During the Aug. 21 solar eclipse, spectators will turn their eyes upward to see the moon pass in front of the sun.

But many Midwest scientists will turn their eyes and cameras to the plants and animals here on the ground. And they're not sure what will happen.

“It's never really been studied systematically,” says Angela Speck, director of astronomy at the University of Missouri Columbia. “We have ideas about: Is this an illumination thing? The amount of light they’re receiving goes down. Is that what it is? Is it a temperature effect? Is it all of that?”

Earlier this week, two spacecraft arrived at the planet Mars. One came from India, the other from the U.S. Both are now in orbit and collecting data. But the Indian probe is conducting its mission at a tiny fraction of the cost of its NASA counterpart.

"Some of the publicly available numbers are in the $74 million to $75 million range," says Amaresh Kollipara, a managing partner of Earth 2 Orbit, a company that pairs private satellite providers with the Indian space agency.

If you happen to be near the Saint Louis Science Center planetarium at around 2 o’clock in the afternoon, look up. You might see a weather balloon.

Students at Saint Louis University are launching them as part of a study sponsored by the U.S. space agency NASA.

The mission aims to improve our understanding of air pollution and global climate.

A southeast Missouri museum received $16 million worth of parts from the decommissioned Space Shuttle program, and has a near complete space shuttle engine.

The museum received liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen high pressure turbo pumps, a combustion chamber and the injector head assembly. Unfortunately, they will not receive the nozzle because NASA still uses them.

Space Museum President Earl Mullins says the combustion chamber never flew on a Shuttle mission.

Kris Husted / KBIA

Former astronaut Sally Ride passed away on Monday after a battle with pancreatic cancer.