north korea

Jon Chol Jin / AP

North Korea has long been a forbidden land for journalists, human rights advocates, and pretty much anyone who publicly disagrees with the regime’s philosophies and practices. But there have been more and more cracks in the facade, and people are beginning to share their stories with the rest of the world.

Updated at 1:25 p.m. ET

North Korea is calling an attack on U.S. Ambassador to South Korea Mark Lippert by a knife-wielding political activist "deserved punishment" for America's joint military exercises with Seoul. Meanwhile, Lippert, who has received stitches to his face and undergone surgery on his arm after the assault, says he is "doing well."

Updated at 6:00 p.m. ET

President Obama called Sony's decision to pull its film The Interview, following threats to movie theaters, a "mistake."

"We cannot have a society in which some dictator someplace can start imposing censorship here in the United States," the president said in his year-end news conference.

He added that he was "sympathetic" to Sony's concerns, but, "I wish they would have spoken to me first."

In June, Global Journalist producer and MU graduate student David Cawthon traveled to Seoul where media professionals gave a glimpse of it’s like to report within the shrouded borders of North Korea. He joined Global Journalist to discuss what journalists revealed about one of the world’s most secretive nations.

Earlier this year, The Associated Press announced it would be opening a permanent comprehensive bureau in the capital city, Pyongyang.