Courtesy Nebraska Appleseed


The meatpacking plants that enable American consumers to find cheap hamburger and chicken wings in the grocery store are among the most dangerous places to work in the country. Federal regulators and meat companies agree more must be done to make slaughterhouses safer, and while there are signs the industry is stepping up its efforts, danger remains.

The rate of meatpacking workers who lose time or change jobs because they’re injured is 70 percent higher than the average for manufacturing workers overall, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

File Photo / KBIA

 A federal agency has found that a storage tank manufacturer is continuing to expose workers to hazardous levels of a chemical than can cause lung cancer and other health problems.


The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration is proposing penalties of $122,000 for a glass company after a worker in southeast Missouri suffered third-degree burns on the job.

OSHA announced the proposed penalties Wednesday for Piramal Glass USA Inc. It isn't clear if the company will contest the penalties. Messages seeking comment from Piramal were not immediately returned.

Federal authorities are investigating after an explosion at a recycling facility in southwest Missouri killed one person and injured another.

Courtesy Todd Feeback/Kansas City Star

When the Bartlett Grain Co. elevator exploded in Atchison, Kan., in October 2011, the town’s 11,000 residents knew it immediately. People who live miles away from the elevator still talk about pictures jumping off walls.

Chad Roberts, 20, was among six people killed in the explosion, one of the deadliest workplace accidents in the last decade. The victims also included elevator employees John Burke, Ryan Federinko and Curtis Field, as well as grain inspectors Travis Keihl and Darrek Klahr. Two others were injured.

Zoe Bock, Roberts’ mother, is still grieving.