Bikas Das / AP

Journalists and bloggers in Bangladesh are finding themselves increasingly under fire. Last year, a group that calls itself “Defenders of Islam” published a “hit list” of more than 80 writers.

Then in the first six months of 2015, three of those named were hacked to death in separate knife attacks. The latest was in May, when four masked men attacked blogger Ananta Bijoy Das with machetes while he was heading to work.

Shahzaib Akber / EPA

Every year, a handful of journalists from around the world are selected to be Alfred Friendly Fellows. These journalists are partnered with American news outlets in the hopes that they can learn and help spread U.S. news ideals, namely fair and accurate reporting.

In his home in Lahore, Pakistan, Saleem Khan holds up his late father's violin. There are no strings, the wood is scratched and the bridge is missing.

"There was a time when people used to come to Lahore from all over the world to hear its musicians," the 65-year-old violinist says in the new documentary, Song of Lahore. "Now we can't even find someone to repair our violins."

Deported for a Tweet

Mar 27, 2015
AP/Today's Zaman

This week on Global Journalist, guest host Joshua Kranzberg takes you around the world for a series of stories on the challenges of journalism in a rapidly changing world.

*Mahir Zeynalov, an Azerbaijani columnist for Turkey's Today's Zaman newspaper, speaks with Global Journalist's Jason McLure about being deported from Turkey for his Twitter use.

(This post was last updated at 2:07 p.m. ET.)

Taliban militants stormed a school in northwest Pakistan on Tuesday, leaving scores of students dead.

Quoting Pakistani officials, multiple media outlets say the death toll is at least 140, including at least 80 students in grades 1 through 10.

A little before 8 p.m. local time, police announced that the operation had ended after the gunmen were killed. Security personnel, police official Abdullah Khan told the AFP, were now in the process of sweeping the rest of the building.

A roundtable with Pakistani journalists

Apr 17, 2014
Kari Paul / Global Journalist

This week, we're looking at journalism in Pakistan. The country remains a treacherous place for journalists to do their jobs. In the past three weeks, two different explosive devices have been found at the home of a television journalist in Peshawar, a city in northern Pakistan. Reporters Without Borders has described the country as "long the world’s deadliest country for media personnel."

Every year the Alfred Friendly Foundation places international journalists in newsrooms across the U.S. The organization aims to impart American journalistic traditions and promote efforts worldwide to promote fair and accurate news. 

Pervez Masih / AP Images

In the past decade, Pakistan’s media has become larger, more powerful and more independent. The number of private television channels has grown from just three state-run channels in 2000 to 89 in 2012. But the challenges to practicing journalism are also growing.

Omar Mullick / Oscilloscope Laboratories.

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year’s True/False Festival.  Find the rest of them here or download the podcast on iTunes.

How US drone strikes impact Pakistan

Jan 31, 2013
Massoud Hossaini / AP Images

The United States government has escalated the uses of drone strikes in Pakistan and in Yemen since the start of the year. And now the U.S. appears to be considering the use of drone strikes in Mali, a North African country where French forces are helping the government fight Islamist militants and rebels.

The Taliban’s attack on a 14 year old human rights campaigner in Pakistan has drawn condemnation from within the country and throughout the world.

Pakistan is the most dangerous country in the world to be a journalist.