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It’s been more than a week since the deadly attack on the French satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo. The remaining staff has put out its first edition, again with a cartoon of the Prophet Mohammed on the cover.  Who is republishing the cartoons? Who isn’t? Is it possible to give this story context without using it? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Jamie Grey and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.


(This post was last updated at 6:50 p.m. ET.)

A nationwide manhunt for the suspects of France's deadliest terrorist attack in more than 50 years ended in a hail of gunfire on Friday.

After hours of tension in two separate standoffs that shut down parts of the Paris metro area, the two main suspects in the attack on a satirical magazine and a man who took hostages at a kosher grocery are dead, President François Hollande said in a speech to the nation.

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Yves Tennevin

On Tuesday, January 7, French authorities confirmed three gunman shot and killed 12 people in Paris at the offices of the weekly satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo. The paper has run cartoons and other content satirizing radical Islam, and the Prophet Mohammed. In 2011, the paper was firebombed. 

French President Francois Holland called the shootings a "terrorist attack of the most extreme barbarity" and video shows armed gunman running through the streets of Paris. As of the shows' recording, the suspects remain at large. 

When a 2011 firebombing destroyed the office of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, editor Stephane Charbonnier said the publication would not shy away from taking jabs at radical Islam.

"If we can poke fun at everything in France, if we can talk about anything in France apart from Islam or the consequences of Islamism, that is annoying," Charbonnier said at the time. "This is the first time we have been physically attacked, but we won't let it get to us."

Updated at 10 p.m. ET.

At least 12 people were killed during a shooting at the headquarters of the satirical Charlie Hebdo weekly in Paris, police say. Two key suspects remain at large (see our latest post for updates).

Moyan Brenn / Flickr

  This week CoMo Explained explores some of the more "alternative" pronunciations in Missouri place names.