police

lake of the ozarks
bsabarnowl / flickr

The Lake of the Ozarks Police Department has purchased twelve body cameras for use beginning later this month.

The cameras will be mandatory for use by all uniformed officers, according to Police Chief Gary Launderville. The department chose body cameras over the traditional in-car camera as the former allows for increased mobility.

“We can go inside a business, we can go inside a house, down the hill, around the corner. We still get video where we don’t have that with an in-car camera,” said Launderville.

Group Pushes for Police to Carry Overdose Drug

Feb 10, 2017
OpenFile Vancouver / Flickr

Columbia Police could be the next first responders to carry a life-saving drug that reverses the effects of opioid overdose.

The Columbia Fire Department started carrying naloxone last month. The drug is more commonly known as Narcan. According to the Narcan website, the drug works by displacing opioid molecules, which reverses the effects of opioid overdoses like slowed breathing and unresponsiveness.

Scott Davidson / Flickr

  A suburban St. Louis police officer shot in the neck during a traffic stop is paralyzed from the neck down due to what the Ballwin police chief calls "catastrophic damage to his spinal cord."

Officer Michael Flamion was shot from behind on July 8 after stopping a man for speeding in Ballwin, a well-to-do St. Louis County town of about 30,000 residents. Antonio Taylor of St. Louis was arrested later that day and is jailed on $500,000 bond on several charges, including first-degree assault of a law enforcement officer.

Scott Davidson / Flickr

Some Missouri lawmakers want to protect lodging websites such as Airbnb from local ordinances that could regulate the services out of business in the state.

Fibonacci Blue / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY - Michael Brown's family is urging Missouri lawmakers to overcome politics and pass a law requiring police to wear body cameras.

Brown's mother told a Senate panel Wednesday that body cameras are only one piece of police reform, but would help restore trust. A body cameras proposal failed last year.

The bill would require police in Missouri's largest cities to record all official interactions. Departments would store the footage for two years, and the public would have access to it as they do incident reports.

Scott Davidson / Flickr

A 34-year-old eastern Missouri man is jailed for allegedly attacking three deputies.

Shaun White of Lincoln County is charged with three counts of assault on law enforcement, along with a drug count and other charges. He is jailed on $25,000 cash-only bond.

Authorities were called to a home at 1 a.m. Wednesday. The resident said White tried to kick in his door and attack him with a knife.

Jason Rojas / Flickr

The U.S. Department of Justice says St. Louis County police need to strengthen policies for handling protests and demonstrations, improve training on diversity and community policing, and do a better job of hiring and promoting minorities and women.

Board Bars St. Louis County Police Use of Dogs on Crowds

Sep 18, 2015
Jason Rojas / Flickr

 St. Louis County's police board has signed off on a policy forbidding the use of police dogs for crowd control.

Scott Davidson / Flickr

Police say a Missouri man accused of fatally shooting a Kentucky trooper has been shot and killed after an hours-long manhunt.

Trooper Jay Thomas, a state police spokesman, says 25-year-old Joseph Thomas Johnson-Shanks was shot by police Monday morning when he refused to drop his weapon. He later died at a hospital.

Authorities say 31-year-old trooper Joseph Cameron Ponder was conducting a traffic stop Sunday night when the driver fled. After a chase, the suspect stopped his car abruptly and fired several shots into Ponder's cruiser. He died later at a hospital.

Tony Webster / Flickr

 A former Missouri police officer has pleaded guilty to violating the constitutional rights of a minor by deliberately dropping the restrained teenager face-first onto the ground. 

KBIA

The makeshift memorial that has marked the site of where Michael Brown was fatally shot by a police officer in August now has been cleared out, and a permanent plaque will be placed nearby.

Wikimedia Commons / Loavesofbread

The Missouri House passed a bill limiting police use of deadly force today, but it faces a big hurdle on the Legislature's final day.

Law enforcement officers have come under pressure over the past few months to rethink how they use deadly force, as a result of the string of videos of shootings by police.

But recently, police have been talking about another video — one that shows an officer not shooting.

Tony Webster / FLICKR

  A bill to limit police use of deadly force has advanced in the Missouri Senate, an effort aimed at addressing concerns raised after the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson.

The Missouri Senate gave initial approval to the bill Tuesday on a voice vote.

Current law justifies deadly force when an officer believes a suspect has committed or attempted a felony, is escaping with a deadly weapon or poses a serious threat of danger to others.

The bill would change part of that law to allow deadly force only if police reasonably believe the suspect has committed or tried to commit a violent felony.

The measure needs a second full Senate vote before it can move to the House.

(This post was last updated at 11:40 p.m. ET.)

A day of mourning gave way to an evening of riots and looting in Baltimore on Monday, where Gov. Larry Hogan declared a state of emergency and deployed the National Guard.

Just hours after Freddie Gray's funeral, hundreds of demonstrators took to the streets, burning police cars, looting stores and facing off with police. Television images showed those demonstrators throwing rocks, bricks and bottles at a line of police officers in riot gear.

Null Value / Flickr

The attorney for a man accused of shooting and wounding two police officers during a demonstration in Ferguson says his client had nothing to do with the incident and police should be searching for the real shooter. 

Scott Davidson / Flickr

Law enforcement groups say public access and retention of footage from police cameras should be limited to protect privacy and contain costs.

Austin Federa / KBIA

  The Ferguson Police Department has suspended a spokesperson after he referred to the Michael Brown memorial as "a pile of trash."

After a night of protests following the fatal police shooting of Antonio Martin, an 18-year-old African American, in Berkeley, St. Louis County Chief of Police Jon Belmar told reporters that things have changed -- at least when it comes how the police respond.

“Tactical operations showed up, but they staged. They never went down to the scene, they were there just in case,” Belmar said.

Taser International

  St. Charles County officials are putting off the purchase of body cameras for police until state lawmakers clarify what images captured by the cameras would have to be made available to the public. 

Talking Politics: 2014 Election Preview

Oct 27, 2014
State of Missouri

 

In this episode of Talking Politics, Prof. Terry Smith of Columbia College gives us an overview of the upcoming 2014 election.  Marshall Griffin gives us a look at Tom Schweich’s bid for state auditor that appears to be turning into a bid for governor. Finally, KBIA’s Bram Sable-Smith will walk us through the Columbia Police Department’s implementation of body cameras.

roy blunt
TalkMediaNews / Flickr

  US Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Missouri, met with local law enforcement in Jefferson City on Monday to discuss when police use military surplus equipment.

The meeting, which was closed to the media, comes almost two months after police responded to protests following the death of Michael Brown with tear gas, armored vehicles and other military equipment acquired through Department of Defense and Homeland Security programs.

Blunt said law enforcement officials he has talked to only use the equipment for defensive purposes and that programs like these are beneficial.

Police forcibly dispersed dozens of protesters in Ferguson early Wednesday morning after hours of  confrontation and the smashing of a window at the Beauty Town shop. Tensions had been running high since Tuesday morning when a memorial for Michael Brown burned down close to where he was killed.

KBIA file photo

An eastern Missouri deputy has resigned after allegedly putting pepper spray on pizza before giving it to inmates.

Scott Davidson via Flickr

Another St. Louis area police officer is out of a job over threats to Ferguson shooting protesters found online.

A forum Thursday evening peering into Ferguson’s longstanding tensions as well as the St. Louis region’s racial divisions became angry and heated, with most of a crowd’s ire directed at the town’s mayor.

Audience members expressed searing criticism of Ferguson’s governance and leadership, both of which have come under fire since one of the Ferguson's police officers shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown.

Join us here as we live blog from our event Thursday evening, Ferguson and Beyond: A Community Conversation. The event will be from 6-8 p.m. at Wellspring Church in Ferguson, Mo.

NPR's Michel Martin will host and moderate the event.

Null Value via Flickr

A federal lawsuit alleges that police in Ferguson and St. Louis County used excessive force and falsely arrested innocent bystanders amid attempts to quell widespread unrest after the fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown.

Scott Davidson via Flickr

A suburban St. Louis police officer shown on cellphone video pointing his rifle at demonstrators in Ferguson and threatening them is now out of a job.

St. Ann Police Chief Aaron Jimenez confirmed in an interview with The Associated Press that police Lieutenant Ray Albers resigned Thursday. A phone call seeking comment from Albers was not returned.

The confrontation happened August 19th during protests that followed the Ferguson police shooting death of Michael Brown.

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