Politics

Political news

Donald Trump will visit Missouri next week to deliver his first address as president to the annual Veterans of Foreign Wars convention.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders says Trump will head to Kansas City on Tuesday to address the gathering.

Missouri Senate Communications

The Missouri Democratic Party is appealing the dismissal of its lawsuit challenging a governor's ability to appoint a lieutenant governor.

The appeal was filed Tuesday. The party has argued that ambiguity in Missouri's constitution and law mean lieutenant governors can only be elected, not appointed.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

President Trump is home from Helsinki and hearing the reaction to his joint news conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin, and backing off some of Monday’s statements.

David Beard, Poynter: “Trump visit ‘exhausting’ British press corps

Brian Stelter, CNN: “Trump ratchets up ‘fake news’ rally cry overseas during UK visit

A well-known security blogger revealed the name of one her sources to the FBI – unsolicited. It’s something most wouldn’t do without court order, and still, there are reporters who will go to jail to protect their sources. So, why did Marcy Wheeler do it? Also, why KMIZ-TV apologized for decisions made during its coverage of the so-called “fireworks war” in Columbia last week, why an edited public service announcement is being blamed for the deaths of dozens in India, and bringing journalism to life… through live theater. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Commentary: Trump and the Communications Revolution

Jul 11, 2018

Two of the marvels of the modern age have directly impacted the developing world.  One is the Green Revolution, using artificial fertilizer to dramatically increase crop yields and keep billions of people from starving.  The earth is severely overpopulated, but mass starvation is not currently a problem.

The second marvel is how cellphone technology emerged at a moment that kept the developing world from having to spend billions and billions of dollars to build telephone landlines and other infrastructure.  In Africa, Asia and South America cell towers and phones are making landlines redundant, if not obsolete.

This communication revolution made me wonder if another communication revolution that is the spawn of cell technology is an explanation for the Trump Phenomenon.  Before Barack Obama, presidents communicated with their publics through traditional media: televised speeches, news conferences, press releases – all of it mediated by professional journalists.  Obama was the first president to use social media, and he used it most effectively in his two election campaigns. 


via Flickr user Michael Coghlan

A well-known security blogger revealed the name of one her sources to the FBI – unsolicited. It’s something most wouldn’t do without court order, and still, there are reporters who will go to jail to protect their sources. So, why did Marcy Wheeler do it?

Marcy Wheeler: “Putting a face (mine) to the risks posed by GOP games on Mueller investigation

Missouri Senate

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri's new lieutenant governor says the state's constitution supports his appointment.

Mike Kehoe said Wednesday that he wouldn't have accepted the job if he didn't believe the office could be filled by a governor's appointment, but he said the courts will have the final say.

Commentary: Greitens and Trump

Jun 19, 2018

In early 2016 I watched the presidential and Missouri gubernatorial campaigns with great curiosity.  After the April GOP debate in Columbia not only did I believe that Eric Greitens would not be the nominee, I was fairly sure the most traditional candidate, Lt. Governor Peter Kinder, would be.  During the spring GOP presidential candidate debates I did not know who the nominee would be, but I was fairly sure it would not be Donald Trump.  Silly me.  Silly lots of us.

Roy Blunt speaks at a podium.
Nathan Lawrence / KBIA

The Trump administration policy to force separation of migrant children and parents at the U.S.-Mexico border is facing pushback from Missouri's U.S. senators.

President Donald J. Trump's summit with Kim Jong Un was historic, but did it help more than it hurt? Plus, could too much coverage of Anthony Bourdain's suicide lead to copycats? We'll also discuss IHOP's attention-getting name change and the judicial decision that gives the green light to a big media merger. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Stacey Woelfel.

Mike Parson, R-Bolivar / Missouri State Senate Website

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Gov. Mike Parson called a rare meeting Monday with Missouri's congressional delegation, earning bipartisan praise from lawmakers.

The group met to discuss a variety of issues facing the state, including infrastructure and the opioid crisis. Stepping out of Parson's office a little before noon, several lawmakers said their relationship with the current governor was already better than the one they had with Eric Greitens, who resigned less than two weeks ago. Both Parson and Greitens are Republicans.

Updated at 10:45 a.m. June 7 with comments from Greitens' attorney — Former Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens admitted as part of a deal with St. Louis prosecutors that they had enough evidence to take him to trial over the use of a charity’s donor list for his campaign.

Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner’s office on Wednesday released the full agreement that led to Greitens stepping down last week. Two paragraphs of that deal had originally been redacted. St. Louis Public Radio and other news outlets had filed requests under Missouri’s open records law to see the complete document. Attorney General Josh Hawley’s office ruled on Tuesday that it was an open record.

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson is nearly a week into his new job and is still hosting private meetings with city and state officials – while taking a few minutes to brief the media on those gatherings at least once a day.

Wednesday’s meetings included one with St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson and St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger. Before the meeting, Krewson told reporters she didn’t have any immediate requests for the new governor.

Mike Parson, R-Bolivar / Missouri State Senate Website

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri Gov. Mike Parson says he's keeping his predecessor Eric Greitens' ban on lobbyist gifts to executive staffers.

That means Parson also is now banned from accepting meals and other gifts. Parson previously served as lieutenant governor but was elevated to the state's top executive office when Greitens resigned amid personal and political scandal Friday.

Gov. Mike Parson met Tuesday with several mayors from across Missouri, including Florissant and St. Peters, as part of the transition into his new job.

He called it the first in a series of meetings with mayors, in which he said he wants his office to provide whatever help or assistance cities and towns may need.

Updated at 9:54 p.m. with the hiring of Parson's chief of staff - Mike Parson kicked off his first full week as Missouri’s governor by meeting with the state’s cabinet members, all chosen by his predecessor, Eric Greitens.

The meeting was held Monday in private, inside the governor’s office, but Parson did briefly meet with reporters beforehand. He said he has no intention of replacing any of Greitens’ chosen agency heads.

Office of Lt. Gov. Mike Parson

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — New Missouri Gov. Mike Parson said Monday that he wants to work with the "good team" of cabinet members selected by former Gov. Eric Greitens.

Parson, who was lieutenant governor and assumed leadership when Greitens chose to step down Friday rather than continue fighting possible impeachment and allegations of personal and political misconduct, met with cabinet members Monday morning.

Missouri's Political Focus Shifts to the Senate Race

Jun 4, 2018

The end of Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens' tenure as governor could breathe new life into Republican U.S. Senate candidate Josh Hawley's campaign.

Greitens stepped down Friday. Fellow Republican Mike Parson, who was lieutenant governor, replaced him.

Greitens' months-long fight for political survival left the GOP bruised and fractured. Greitens' troubles posed challenges on multiple fronts for Hawley. While Democrats attempted to tie him to the former embattled governor, Hawley's call for Greitens to step down also angered some Republicans loyal to him.

Lt. Gov. Mike Parson set forth on a new chapter in Missouri political history by becoming the state’s 57th governor — promising to stabilize a state government rocked by departing-Gov. Eric Greitens’ scandals.

Parson, 62, took the oath of office shortly after 5:30 p.m., Friday.

Missouri voters will be asked in November to increase the state’s gas tax by 10 cents a gallon.

The Missouri House approved the proposal Friday, in the final hours of the legislative session, after the Senate had tacked it onto another bill.

The increase would be phased in over 10 years, and would be used to pay for road and bridge projects, and underwrite some of the costs for the Missouri Highway Patrol.

“We just can’t keep putting this off,’’ said state Rep. Kathie Conway, a Republican from St. Charles. “We need the money.”

Commentary: Permanent Interests

May 18, 2018

At Columbia College I teach and study American domestic politics.  I know only enough about foreign policy and international relations to be dangerous.  That said I willingly acknowledge that foreign and domestic policy are inseparably intertwined.  President Trump is betting that foreign policy successes will benefit him politically at home.  More about this in a minute.

A surprise twist in the Greitens invasion of privacy case earlier this week -- did anyone see it coming? Many in the White House are trying to stop all the leaks, and not the plumbing kind. Plus, print reporters cashing in on television appearances, new sports gambling laws and we ask the question: who won't be covering this weekend's Royal wedding festivities? From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Stacey Woelfel: Views of the News.

missouri house floor
File photo / KBIA

Sen. Bill Eigel, R-Weldon Spring, thought there was a consensus among his fellow lawmakers on a House tax bill when he brought it to the floor. However, differing opinions on the bill may have killed chances for this year.

The bill would reduce the income tax rate for the highest bracket by .4%, with the possibility of a reduction of .5%

missouri capitol
File Photo / KBIA

A Missouri senator is trying to stop Gov. Eric Greitens' State Board of Education appointees from withdrawing in an attempt to bar them from being reappointed later.

 

If gubernatorial appointees are withdrawn before Friday, they could potentially be appointed later to the same position. So Sen. Gary Romine in a procedural move Monday attempted to reject their withdrawal. 

The Missouri House has given final approval to a proposal that would ask voters later this year to put right-to-work language into the state’s constitution.

Monday night’s action is part of a two-pronged effort by predominantly Republican supporters to protect a right-to-work law they passed last year.

Under right to work, unions and employers are barred from requiring workers to pay dues or fees. Supporters say right to work would give workers more freedom and attract more business to the state. Opponents say such a law drives down wages and is a GOP effort to hurt unions because they primarily support Democrats.

In a stunning move, St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner has dropped the felony invasion of privacy charge against Gov. Eric Greitens — short-circuiting the unprecedented trial of a sitting Missouri chief executive.

While Gardner’s office is promising to refile the case with a special prosecutor, the governor’s attorneys are confident that another prosecutor won’t touch the case.

The chairman of the Missouri House committee that’s investigating Gov. Eric Greitens said Monday they’re getting pushback from the governor’s camp.

Rep. Jay Barnes, R-Jefferson City, told reporters that they’ve issued a subpoena to Greitens’ advisor Austin Chambers, and to the groups Greitens for Missouri and A New Missouri, via attorney Catherine Hanaway. He said the groups have provided some documents but are refusing to provide others.

A new front has opened up in the battle over whether Missouri should become a right-to-work state.

Under right-to-work, unions and employers would be barred from requiring all workers within a bargaining unit to pay dues or fees. On Friday, the Missouri House passed a measure that would ingrain right-to-work in the state constitution.

The staff of the Denver Post has an unlikely advocate: the city’s mayor. He says the city needs the Post and its staff of dogged reporters, and is helping in its fight against its hedge fund owners. Also, Tronc recognizes the new union at the Chicago Tribune, NBC’s parent company makes a run for 21stCentury Fox and what has some of Charlie Rose’s accusers thinking he’s planning a comeback. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The staff of the Denver Post has an unlikely advocate: the city’s mayor. He says the city needs the Post and its staff of dogged reporters, and is helping in its fight against its hedge fund owners.

Chuck Plunkett, Rolling Stone: “Op-Ed: I stood up for ‘The Denver Post’ and was forced to resign

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