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Photo by Amy Simons

Five students from the University of Missouri's Honors College participated in a 16-week tutorial under the direction of Missouri School of Journalism professor Amy Simons on media criticism during the Fall 2017 term. For their final project, the students produced and hosted their own special edition of KBIA-FM's program, "Views of the News."

In September, President Donald Trump announced he would end a federal program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA. The program was created in 2012 when then President Barack Obama signed an executive order.

DACA protects nearly 800,000 people around the United States who were brought here as children without documentation, giving them a chance to work or study without the risk of deportation. Missouri has about 3,500 DACA recipients, and nearly half of them are students.

KBIA’s Hannah Haynes talked with a young DACA recipient to find out how the program has changed her life and what the Trump administration might mean for the program going forward. 


Brian Ross has long been regarded as one of the best investigative reporters in the business, but Friday’s fact error regarding Michael Flynn’s guilty plea created big problems for ABC. The network has suspended him for four weeks. But, to what end? Also, NBC after Matt Lauer, Time Magazine’s Person of the Year and what’s next for net neutrality. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

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Brian Ross has long been regarded as one of the best investigative reporters in the business, but Friday’s fact error regarding Michael Flynn’s guilty plea created big problems for ABC. The network has suspended him for four weeks. But, to what end? 

They were once two of America's most trusted broadcasters. Today Matt Lauer and Garrison Keillor are both out of a job following allegations of sexual misconduct in the workplace. Also, dogged reporting at the Washington Post roots out someone trying to scam reporters, the New York Times’ feature on a Nazi sympathizer draws deep criticism and Time Magazine’s new owners. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The network notified Lauer of it's decision late Tuesday night after an investigation into claims of 'inappropriate sexual behavior in the workplace.'  Keillor notified the Associated Press of his firing in an email to the agency. 

Commentary: Premature Celebration

Nov 29, 2017

Earlier this month, according to many in the media, Democrats held an election and – guess what?  -- they won.  They won governorships in New Jersey and Virginia and made big gains in the Virginia state legislature.  Much has been made of this – Democrats are back, went the narrative.

Is the media stirring the pot? Is the coverage of the sex scandals – now rocking entertainment, journalism and politics – potentially destroying innocent lives? In our attempts to listen to and be supportive of accusers are we denying the accused due process or benefit of the doubt? We’ll debate. Also, Donald Trump Jr.’s communication with WikiLeaks, why the New York Times is suing a woman who identified herself as one of the paper’s reporters and Simpsons’ fans, it’s time to talk about Apu. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.

Is the media stirring the pot? Is the coverage of the sex scandals – now rocking entertainment, journalism and politics – potentially destroying innocent lives? In our attempts to listen to and be supportive of accusers are we denying the accused due process or benefit of the doubt? 

Commentary: Soccer and Foreign Policy

Nov 14, 2017

  President Trump’s Asia trip makes me think of – soccer. I love soccer. Columbia College has two nationally-ranked teams and I’m a big fan. I help my daughter coach a recreation league team here in Columbia that my granddaughters and grandson play on. I coached youth soccer for many years when we lived in Kirksville.

Covering the sexual assault and harassment scandals rocking the entertainment world hasn’t been easy for many journalists, but it’s even harder when the accusations fly within your own organization. Also, what prompted a billionaire to shutter the Gothamist and DNAInfo hyperlocal news sites, why Disney shut out the LA Times, and YouTube’s algorithm serves violent videos to children. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Use Taxes Fail in Boone County and Columbia

Nov 8, 2017
vote here sign
KBIA file photo

Columbia voters narrowly voted down a measure that would have created a use tax in Columbia that matched the regular city tax rate. With just over 8.400 votes cast for Proposition 1, it failed by a margin of just 132 votes (50.78% no, 49.22% yes).

Covering the sexual assault and harassment scandals rocking the entertainment world hasn’t been easy for many journalists, but it’s even harder when the accusations fly within your own organization. 

Meiying Wu / KBIA

At the heart of the use tax measures Boone County residents will be voting on Tuesday, Nov. 7, is online shopping.

Local store around the country must compete with out-of-state retailers as more people shop online. Many of these out-of-state online businesses do not have to pay local sales tax, allowing them to sell some products for lower prices.

 


Did 21st Century Fox renew Bill O’Reilly’s contract soon after he settled a sexual harassment suit for more than $32 million – six months after founder Roger Ailes’ ouster? A New York Times report says so. Also, CNN puts facts first using an apple, why ESPN canceled “Barstool Van Talk” after only one episode and how the ethics of covering the apprehension of a potentially suicidal person. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Talking Politics: Boone County Reviews Bids for New Inmate Phone System

Oct 25, 2017
Di Pan / KBIA

Boone County began reviewing bids this week for a new contract for its inmate phone system in the county jail. The county is looking to overhaul its current system after critiques of the high costs to detainees and their families making calls.

County jails across the state contract with private companies to provide phone services for inmates, in return the jail gets a cut of the phone charges.

via Flickr user Justin Hoch

Did 21st Century Fox renew Bill O’Reilly’s contract soon after he settled a sexual harassment suit for more than $32 million – six months after founder Roger Ailes’ ouster? A New York Times report says so.

Emily Steel & Michael S. Schmidt, New York Times: “O’Reilly settled new harassment claim, then Fox renewed his contract

Harvey Weinstein remains in rehab undergoing treatment for a sex addiction while his peers expel him from the Motion Picture Academy and the Producers Guild and his company crumbles financially. Meanwhile, NBC execs deny claims they quashed a reporter’s work on the story and football commentator jokes on Sunday Night Football. We’ll break down the developments in the Weinstein saga. Also, President Donald Trump’s threat to go after broadcast licenses, why the New York Times felt a need to update its social media policy and why it’s so hard for some people to ad lib on TV. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Harvey Weinstein remains in rehab undergoing treatment for a sex addiction while his peers expel him from the Motion Picture Academy and the Producers Guild and his company crumbles financially. Meanwhile, NBC execs deny claims they quashed a reporter’s work on the story and football commentator jokes on Sunday Night Football.

Gregg Kilday, The Hollywood Reporter: “Academy expels Harvey Weinstein

Commentary: Gerrymandering and the Court

Oct 17, 2017

The Supreme Court is back in business after its summer recess.  It is hearing oral arguments on several cases that have landmark potential.  Perhaps the most consequential is Gill v Whitford, a Wisconsin case about gerrymandering.

The fallout from the New York Times’ reporting on harassment allegations against Hollywood movie mogul Harvey Weinstein have meant big changes for the company he co-founded. Why is it taking decades for those stories to become public? Also, ESPN suspends Jemele Hill after another violation of the network’s social media policy, Dove apologizes for a racially insensitive promotion and Facebook has a plan for fact checking. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.

The fallout from the New York Times’ reporting on harassment allegations against Hollywood movie mogul Harvey Weinstein have meant big changes for the company he co-founded. Why is it taking decades for those stories to become public? 

Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, New York Times: “Harvey Weinstein paid off sexual harassment accusers for decades

  Congress missed the deadline to delay federal funding cuts to hospitals last week. Without a solution, many Missouri hospitals could be hit hard.

The Disproportionate Share Hospital Program, also known as “DSH,” is a federal funding program that helps offset the costs for hospitals that serve uninsured patients.

The Missouri Department of Corrections allegedly retaliates against prisoners who file complaints against prison guards and other officials, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday.

Filed in St. Louis County Court by the MacArthur Justice Center at St. Louis, the lawsuit claims inmates who file complaints regularly have their cells searched, are denied privacy for telephone calls and lawyer visits and, in some cases, are transferred to facilities greater distances away from their families.

Several National Football League owners took to the field in solidarity with their players following President Trump’s incendiary words toward those who kneeled during the playing of the national anthem. We’ll talk about what happens when sports gets political. Also, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg acknowledges the platform’s advertising practices are flawed, Megyn Kelly’s ‘Today’ debut, and interactions between reporters and police during the ongoing protests in St. Louis. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Keith Allison

Several National Football League owners took to the field in solidarity with their players following President Trump’s incendiary words toward those who kneeled during the playing of the national anthem. We’ll talk about what happens when sports gets political. 

Commentary: Summer Reading

Sep 26, 2017

  Hillary Clinton has written a book about the 2016 election entitled What Happened. I was going to say that it picks at a big scab on the body politic, but scabs assume wounds have healed. The 2016 election is still an open sore for many Americans and Clinton’s book is – how shall I say this? – not medicinal.

Emmy host Stephen Colbert invites former White House press secretary Sean Spicer to appear on stage at last Sunday's ceremony. Who wasn't in on the joke? Was Harvard "behaving stupidly" when it rescinded an invitation to Chelsea Manning to become a visiting fellow? Also, reactions by ESPN management after Jemele Hill speaks out against #Trump; and will Ken Burns' latest documentary about the #VietnamWar attract an audience beyond the baby boomers who lived through it? From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Jamie Grey. KBIA 91.3 FM

Talking Politics: Police Chief Ken Burton Gives His Take on Racial Desparity in Traffic Stops

Sep 19, 2017

Traffic stop data released by the Missouri Attorney General's office shows a disparity between black and white drivers in Columbia, but not everyone agrees as to what the numbers mean.

Black drivers in Columbia were pulled over at a rate almost four times higher than white drivers in 2016.

Some local groups, like Race Matters, Friends, say this is clear evidence of racial profiling and called for changes in the police department. Some have even called for the resignation of Police Chief Ken Burton, who has voiced skepticism about the traffic stop data.

The Columbia Missourian’s Katherine Reed and Noah McGee spoke in-depth with Burton to get his take on the data and how the department can be improved.

Reporters have been wrapping themselves around street signs and lampposts since Dan Rather’s first hurricane live shot during Hurricane Carla in 1961. We tell our audiences to stay inside, is it time to take our own advice? Also, the ethics of undercover reporting, why the Department of Justice wants some RT associates to register as foreign agents, and Disney’s attempt to bring back the Mickey Mouse Club – or should we say Club Mickey Mouse. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

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