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Harvey Weinstein remains in rehab undergoing treatment for a sex addiction while his peers expel him from the Motion Picture Academy and the Producers Guild and his company crumbles financially. Meanwhile, NBC execs deny claims they quashed a reporter’s work on the story and football commentator jokes on Sunday Night Football. We’ll break down the developments in the Weinstein saga. Also, President Donald Trump’s threat to go after broadcast licenses, why the New York Times felt a need to update its social media policy and why it’s so hard for some people to ad lib on TV. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Harvey Weinstein remains in rehab undergoing treatment for a sex addiction while his peers expel him from the Motion Picture Academy and the Producers Guild and his company crumbles financially. Meanwhile, NBC execs deny claims they quashed a reporter’s work on the story and football commentator jokes on Sunday Night Football.

Gregg Kilday, The Hollywood Reporter: “Academy expels Harvey Weinstein

The Supreme Court is back in business after its summer recess.  It is hearing oral arguments on several cases that have landmark potential.  Perhaps the most consequential is Gill v Whitford, a Wisconsin case about gerrymandering.

The fallout from the New York Times’ reporting on harassment allegations against Hollywood movie mogul Harvey Weinstein have meant big changes for the company he co-founded. Why is it taking decades for those stories to become public? Also, ESPN suspends Jemele Hill after another violation of the network’s social media policy, Dove apologizes for a racially insensitive promotion and Facebook has a plan for fact checking. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.

The fallout from the New York Times’ reporting on harassment allegations against Hollywood movie mogul Harvey Weinstein have meant big changes for the company he co-founded. Why is it taking decades for those stories to become public? 

Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, New York Times: “Harvey Weinstein paid off sexual harassment accusers for decades

  Congress missed the deadline to delay federal funding cuts to hospitals last week. Without a solution, many Missouri hospitals could be hit hard.

The Disproportionate Share Hospital Program, also known as “DSH,” is a federal funding program that helps offset the costs for hospitals that serve uninsured patients.

The Missouri Department of Corrections allegedly retaliates against prisoners who file complaints against prison guards and other officials, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday.

Filed in St. Louis County Court by the MacArthur Justice Center at St. Louis, the lawsuit claims inmates who file complaints regularly have their cells searched, are denied privacy for telephone calls and lawyer visits and, in some cases, are transferred to facilities greater distances away from their families.

Several National Football League owners took to the field in solidarity with their players following President Trump’s incendiary words toward those who kneeled during the playing of the national anthem. We’ll talk about what happens when sports gets political. Also, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg acknowledges the platform’s advertising practices are flawed, Megyn Kelly’s ‘Today’ debut, and interactions between reporters and police during the ongoing protests in St. Louis. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Keith Allison

Several National Football League owners took to the field in solidarity with their players following President Trump’s incendiary words toward those who kneeled during the playing of the national anthem. We’ll talk about what happens when sports gets political. 

Commentary: Summer Reading

Sep 26, 2017

  Hillary Clinton has written a book about the 2016 election entitled What Happened. I was going to say that it picks at a big scab on the body politic, but scabs assume wounds have healed. The 2016 election is still an open sore for many Americans and Clinton’s book is – how shall I say this? – not medicinal.

Emmy host Stephen Colbert invites former White House press secretary Sean Spicer to appear on stage at last Sunday's ceremony. Who wasn't in on the joke? Was Harvard "behaving stupidly" when it rescinded an invitation to Chelsea Manning to become a visiting fellow? Also, reactions by ESPN management after Jemele Hill speaks out against #Trump; and will Ken Burns' latest documentary about the #VietnamWar attract an audience beyond the baby boomers who lived through it? From Missouri School of Journalism professors Mike McKean, Earnest Perry and Jamie Grey. KBIA 91.3 FM

Talking Politics: Police Chief Ken Burton Gives His Take on Racial Desparity in Traffic Stops

Sep 19, 2017

Traffic stop data released by the Missouri Attorney General's office shows a disparity between black and white drivers in Columbia, but not everyone agrees as to what the numbers mean.

Black drivers in Columbia were pulled over at a rate almost four times higher than white drivers in 2016.

Some local groups, like Race Matters, Friends, say this is clear evidence of racial profiling and called for changes in the police department. Some have even called for the resignation of Police Chief Ken Burton, who has voiced skepticism about the traffic stop data.

The Columbia Missourian’s Katherine Reed and Noah McGee spoke in-depth with Burton to get his take on the data and how the department can be improved.

Reporters have been wrapping themselves around street signs and lampposts since Dan Rather’s first hurricane live shot during Hurricane Carla in 1961. We tell our audiences to stay inside, is it time to take our own advice? Also, the ethics of undercover reporting, why the Department of Justice wants some RT associates to register as foreign agents, and Disney’s attempt to bring back the Mickey Mouse Club – or should we say Club Mickey Mouse. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

In this episode of Talking Politics, Professor Mark Horvit explains what’s in store for Missouri lawmakers as they meet for their annual veto session this week. Mark Horvit is a professor at the Missouri School of Journalism and leads the school’s state government reporting program.

Of all the vetoed bills, one of the most talked about is a measure that would fix funding cuts to in-home and nursing home care for seniors.


CNN's Patrick Oppmann reports on Hurricane Irma from Cuba.
Courtesy CNN

Reporters have been wrapping themselves around street signs and lampposts since Dan Rather’s first hurricane live shot during Hurricane Carla in 1961. We tell our audiences to stay inside, is it time to take our own advice? 

Hollywood usually banks on big summer blockbusters… but this year, Americans said no to the going to the movies. Was it this year’s offerings? Or are our entertainment options changing and making the movie theater a thing of the past? Also, why the EPA called an AP report about Houston superfund sites yellow journalism, an ESPN commentator quits rather than call football games, and Tronc’s move to buy the New York Daily News. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Ryan Thomas and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Sarah_Ackerman

Hollywood usually banks on big summer blockbusters… but this year, Americans said no to the going to the movies. Was it this year’s offerings? Or are our entertainment options changing and making the movie theater a thing of the past? 

Adam B. Vary, BuzzFeed: “Why Hollywood bombed so badly this summer

Commentary: Trump is Not a Republican

Sep 5, 2017

These commentaries are a team effort. I can’t thank KBIA staff enough for their production support: Ryan, Sarah, Nathan, Beatriz and Kyle by name. If you enjoyed the recent Beatles commentary, thank Kyle Felling.

 

Reporters are stepping up to cover Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath in ways we haven’t seen in more than a decade. This week, a look at some of the personal stories, the changes in technology and what’s still to come in the reporting from south Texas. Also, ESPN’s decision to pull a broadcaster from a University of Virgina football game because of his name, the removal of a novel from the New York Times’ Bestseller List, and the end of an era in “pop” music. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy KHOU-TV

Reporters are stepping up to cover Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath in ways we haven’t seen in more than a decade. This week, a look at some of the personal stories, the changes in technology and what’s still to come in the reporting from south Texas. 

Brian Stelter, CNN Money: “Networks, newspapers out in full force as Hurricane Harvey soaks Texas

ALEX HEUER / St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens has appointed two executives who gave him political donations to the Coordinating Board for Higher Education.

Appointees announced this week include Investa Management owner Carl Bolm, who gave the Republican $75,000 for his campaign for governor.

Journalists spent more than a year reporting on Monday’s historic eclipse. It only took three minutes for that event to become a footnote in history. Was the coverage worth it? Who watched it and how will it be remembered? Also, what’s ahead for Steve Bannon and Breitbart News now that he’s back at the alt-right news site following his departure from the White House, brands back off from advertising amid politically and racially-charged news coverage. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Missouri Department of Conservation

Journalists spent more than a year reporting on Monday’s historic eclipse. It only took three minutes for that event to become a footnote in history. Was the coverage worth it? Who watched it and how will it be remembered? 

Commentary: Mind Your Own Business

Aug 16, 2017

As children we were all told by someone – another kid, a parent, a teacher – to “Mind your own business.”  Usually good advice, not always heeded, of course.  Kids who frequently didn’t mind their own business often grew up to become lawyers.  Just kidding.

Jason Rosenbaum / St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Treasurer Eric Schmitt says he's backing fellow Republican Attorney General Josh Hawley to run for Democratic U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill's seat. Schmitt had expressed interest in a 2018 U.S. Senate run, but announced yesterday he won't seek the Republican nomination. 

File Photo / KBIA

A recent special legislative session on abortion policies cost Missouri taxpayers nearly $92,000.

Figures provided to The Associated Press show the House spent about $60,000 and the Senate nearly $32,000 on the session that ran from mid-June to late July.

The session resulted in a new law that will tighten abortion regulations, give the attorney general power to prosecute violations and exempt pregnancy resource centers from a St. Louis ordinance banning discrimination based on "reproductive health decisions."

If you’ve been listening to these commentaries for a while you may remember the three musical commentaries in 2008.  The 2008 presidential campaign was explained by, in turn, the Beatles, Disco and Classic Rock.

Well, the Beatles are back and will tell us all we need to know about the last year in American politics. Just listen:

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — Physicians will have to meet with women seeking abortions three days before the procedure and Missouri’s attorney general will have the ability to enforce abortion laws under the bill headed to Gov. Eric Greitens on Tuesday.

Updated 7:15 p.m. July 24 with Senate reconvening — The Missouri General Assembly’s special session dealing with new abortion restrictions resumed Monday, though senators declined to take immediate action on Sen. Andrew Koenig’s bill. Several Republican senators were absent, which meant there weren’t enough votes to kill a Democratic filibuster.

Jonathunder / Wikimedia commons

A federal appeals court has upheld a judge's order that Missouri taxpayers pay more than $156,000 to cover Planned Parenthood's legal bills tied to a legal dispute over a clinic's abortion license.

The 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Thursday affirmed U.S. District Judge Nanette Laughrey's August 2016 decision that the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services must pay the attorneys' fees and expenses incurred by what now is Planned Parenthood Great Plains.

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