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Former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski is CNN’s newest political analyst, offering insight and analysis into his former employer. Why did the cable network plop down $500,000 to bring him on board? How will non-disclosure agreements affect his ability to offer insights? And, does that hurt CNN’s credibility? Also, live streaming the House sit-in using social media apps, covering the Brexit vote and a reporter’s undercover reporting inside a for-profit prison. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Image via Wikimedia Commons

Former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski is CNN’s newest political analyst, offering insight and analysis into his former employer. Why did the cable network plop down $500,000 to bring him on board? How will non-disclosure agreements affect his ability to offer insights? And, does that hurt CNN’s credibility?

Updated 3:14 p.m. with reaction -- Gov. Jay Nixon has vetoed a wide-ranging bill that would have eased regulations on people seeking to obtain or renew a conceal-carry endorsement or permit.

Nixon cited one of his main concerns with Senate Bill 656 when he told reporters last week that it could rob county sheriffs of the authority to deny conceal-carry privileges when they see fit. He expanded on that concern in his veto message today.

As with so many mass shootings in this country, the events at Orlando’s Pulse nightclub raised many questions about access to guns, terrorism, radicalized Islam – and homophobia. But now critics are questioning whether a journalist’s sexual orientation or gender identity may influence their ability to cover the story fairly. Is that criticism fair? Also, the FAA relaxes regulations on commercial drone use, Disney’s coverage of Disney, and Donald Trump’s decision to pull the Washington Post’s credentials. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

As with so many mass shootings in this country, the events at Orlando’s Pulse nightclub raised many questions about access to guns, terrorism, radicalized Islam – and homophobia. But now critics are questioning whether a journalist’s sexual orientation or gender identity may influence their ability to cover the story fairly. Is that criticism fair?

ALEX HEUER / ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

Republican gubernatorial candidate Eric Greitens' campaign says it has no relationship with the treasurer of a political action committee that's behind attack ads, even though the man made calls at a campaign event. 

File / KBIA

Missouri public colleges and universities are set to restructure general education courses to make it easier for students to get credit for classes if they transfer schools.

Gov. Jay Nixon today signed legislation that will require schools to adopt similar 42-credit-hour, lower-level curriculums.

The goal is for public colleges and universities to set up similar general education classes so students can more easily transfer.

David Shane / Flickr

A former GOP gubernatorial candidate and a conservative talk radio host are among those who will review the University of Missouri following turmoil last fall.

The University of Missouri fell under scrutiny after student protests in Columbia over what some saw as administrators' indifference to racial issues.

Lawmakers frustrated over how the protests were handled created the UM System Review Commission to review system policies and administrative structure. The eight-member commission will recommend changes.

Commentary: Trump and the Media

Jun 14, 2016
Via Flickr user Gage Skidmore

I just finished an interesting book entitled The Republic of Spin by historian and journalist David Greenberg.  It is a history of how presidents have managed mass media.

After Gov. Jay Nixon placed his signature on legislation that could expand Medicaid for Missourians who are disabled or elderly, I couldn’t help but think back to when the Democratic official visited Bob Pund’s apartment.

Nixon was a mere attorney general when he ventured into Pund’s residence back in 2007. Pund is paralyzed from the shoulders down and had been critical of major cuts made to Medicaid in 2005. As Nixon sat in Pund’s living room, the aspiring governor vowed to make reversing those reductions a priority of his eventual administration – even if he was faced with a Republican-controlled legislature.

Update June 9 with signature: Gov. Jay Nixon signed legislation on Thursday that could expand Medicaid eligibility for Missourians who are elderly or living with a disability.

For decades, Missourians who were elderly, blind or disabled could only have $1,000 or less in savings. The bill Nixon signed would gradually raise that asset limit to $5,000 for an unmarried person and $10,000 for a married couple.

Did Hillary Clinton clinch the nomination for president on Monday? Some media outlets say she did. Others say not quite. Why the confusion? BuzzFeed turns down $1.3 million in advertising from the Republican Committee over Donald Trump. Also, Tribune Publishing becomes tronc and Ken Starr’s bizarre television moment. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mark Hinojosa: Views of the News.

marcn/FLICKR

Did Hillary Clinton clinch the nomination for president on Monday? Some media outlets say she did. Others say not quite. Why the confusion?

Hadas Gold, POLITICO: “Why the AP called it for Clinton

Brian Stelter, CNN Money: “Why the media were ready to call Clinton the ‘presumptive nominee’

Gov. Jay Nixon on Monday signed several bills into law, including one designed to prevent identity theft.

Senate Bill 624 makes it a class A misdemeanor to possess stolen credit card information or devises, even if the info or devise has not been used after being stolen.

j.stephenconn / flickr

Missouri's budget director says revenue is up 3.4 percent compared to the same time last year.

Director Dan Haug on Thursday announced that the state brought in about $8.1 billion in the current fiscal year through May. At the same time last year, the state had $7.8 billion.

Revenue in May was up 12 percent compared to May 2015.

Individual income tax collections increased more than 4 percent so far this year and more than 12 percent last month. The state's collected roughly $6.6 billion.

It took him nearly a decade, but Silicon Valley billionaire Peter Thiel has found a way to get revenge on Gawker Media for outing him: secretly bankroll defamation lawsuits to drive it out of business. He financed Hulk Hogan’s case to the tune of $10 million and is said to be behind other celebrity lawsuits, too. Also, whether an editor’s decision discredits Katie Couric’s gun safety documentary, Donald Trump spars with reporters, and the debut of cable television’s ‘Roots’ reboot. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Steve Jurvetson

It took him nearly a decade, but Silicon Valley billionaire Peter Thiel has found a way to get revenge on Gawker Media for outing him: secretly bankroll defamation lawsuits to drive it out of business. He financed Hulk Hogan’s case to the tune of $10 million and is said to be behind other celebrity lawsuits, too.

Nick Denton, Gawker: “An open letter to Peter Thiel

Austin Federa / KBIA

Regulations aimed at helping companies such as Uber and Lyft expand in Missouri died in the Legislature this year.

At issue is whether the ride-hailing companies are governed by uniform statewide rules or by varying rules from city to city. The companies say differing rules make it hard for them to do business. 

Updated with MNEA decision - One of two ballot initiatives that would increase Missouri’s cigarette tax may be in trouble. A Cole County judge has said the fiscal note on a 60-cent-a-pack proposal overestimates the revenue that would be raised. He has directed the auditor to review the projection, and that would invalidate the petitions turned in by Raise Your Hand for Kids.

The organization has said it will appeal.

File / KBIA

Missouri's Republican legislative leaders and more than 100 others say they oppose the Obama administration's directive on transgender student bathroom access.

Columns at University of Missouri
File Photo / KBIA

A former state lawmaker is suing over an associate University of Missouri law professor and attorney general candidate's emails.

Senate floor at the Missouri Capitol
File / KBIA

A Missouri Senate staffer has begun reviewing Planned Parenthood's internal records, including procedures for fetal tissue disposal.

Nine out of 10 Native Americans say they support the use of the name “Redskins” for the Washington NFL franchise, according to a Washington Post poll of approximately 500 people. What prompted the paper to commission such a poll? And, how is the team’s ownership using it to further his own political purposes? Also, St. Louis County drops the trespassing charges against two journalists arrested in Ferguson, the latest in the negotiations between Tribune Publishing and Gannett and the saga of Sumner Redstone and control of Viacom.  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Keith Allison

Nine out of 10 Native Americans say support the use of the name “Redskins” for the Washington NFL franchise, according to a Washington Post poll of approximately 500 people. What prompted the paper to commission such a poll? And, how is the team’s ownership using it to further his own political purposes?

Finding Humor in the Presidential Primaries

May 24, 2016

I’ve followed American politics since I was a kid.  I teach classes in it at Columbia College.  I talk to you occasionally about it.

Last fall and winter I was telling people, with a fair amount of confidence, that Hillary Clinton was on a glide path to a coronation and with only slightly less confidence that she would beat Jeb Bush in the general election.

The woman at the center of the New York Times’ story about Donald Trump’s treatment of women has her words were taken out of context, and Trump wants everyone to know it. Also, why a “little black dress” made headlines in Los Angeles and the debate as to whether ‘This American Life’ producer Ira Glass has forgotten the mission of public radio. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Brett Johnson: Views of the News.

If there’s one constant about the last week of the Missouri General Assembly’s session, it’s that nobody in the Capitol has to search very hard to find delicious pie.

For several decades, senators have served up rhubarb pies, French silk pies, and even gooseberry pies to hungry legislators and staff. The uncontroversial and widely celebrated “Pie Day” event provides a big boost to proprietors like the Rolling Pin in Glasgow, and a bit of levity within the General Assembly's intense final days.

The woman at the center of the New York Times' story about Donald Trump’s treatment of women has her words were taken out of context, and Trump wants everyone to know it.

Did Facebook’s news team suppress content from conservative news sources, purposely excluding it from its Trending Topics section? That’s the claim of a former employee who says curators regularly omitted stories based on politics. Also, why an editorial cartoonist lost his job at an Iowa farm publication, how an ex-Obama administration official “sold” the media on the Iran deal, and a quick death for London’s newest newspaper. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Did Facebook’s news team suppress content from conservative news sources, purposely excluding it from its Trending Topics section? That’s the claim of a former employee who says curators regularly omitted stories based on politics.

Philip Bump, Washington Post: “Did Facebook bury conservative news? Ex-staffers say yes

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