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Come Saturday, Columbia’s afternoon newspaper, The Columbia Daily Tribune, will have a corporate owner, ending 115 years of local, family ownership. Why did the Waters family sell to GateHouse Media? And, what might the change mean for those who work there and those who have relied on it as their local news source for generations? Also, we’ll break down the first presidential debate, the coverage, the focus on fact-checking and Lester Holt’s performance as moderator. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Photo by Amy Simons (KBIA)

Come Saturday, Columbia’s afternoon newspaper, The Columbia Daily Tribune, will have a corporate owner, ending 115 years of local, family ownership. Why did the Waters family sell to GateHouse Media? And, what might the change mean for those who work there and those who have relied on it as their local news source for generations?

Caleb Rowden
File Photo / KBIA

  Republican State Representative Caleb Rowden is serving a second term in the Missouri House for District 44 and is running for the state senate seat in District 19, previously held by State Senator Kurt Schaefer. Rowden’s platform focuses on economic development, low taxes, government accountability and strengthening Missouri’s public education system.

The University of Missouri and public K-12 education serve as the centerpiece of Rowden’s campaign.

Last Thursday morning I opened my New York Times and choked on my coffee.  Once again Missouri was in the national news and not in a good way.  The lead editorial was a scathing critique of the Missouri legislature’s override of Governor Nixon’s veto of the change to the conceal-carry law.

The Washington Post makes history, being the first publication to call for the prosecution of a key source. Why is the paper’s editorial board turning its back on NSA leaker Edward Snowden? Also, have we seen the end of the birther movement, Megyn Kelly’s new role of producer,and how a journalist’s skills could be used to teach life skills.  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy Prixas Films via Wikimedia Commons

The Washington Post makes history, being the first publication to call for the prosecution of a key source. Why is the paper’s editorial board turning its back on NSA leaker Edward Snowden?

Daniel Aubuchon

You can find Don Waterman working at the Columbia Bass Pro Shops, checking people out at the register or helping customers find what they’re looking for. But now he’s casting his line for the state legislature.

Waterman is running as the Republican candidate for the District 46 House of Representative’s seat. He got his first taste of politics by working for Danie Moore’s campaign in the 2008 state election primaries. Now, as a candidate, Waterman wants to tackle Missourians’ access to mental health facilities.

Hillary Clinton’s health is in the news again. What information does she owe the press – and the American people? Was there ever any doubt that Donald Trump’s interview with Larry King would end up on Vladimir Putin’s RT network? Also, what pressure did Matt Lauer’s performance during a candidate forum put on future debate moderators? Facebook’s about face on censoring an iconic photo from the Vietnam War, the role of the local gossip columnist. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.

marcn/FLICKR

Hillary Clinton’s health is in the news again. What information does she owe the press – and the American people?

Callum Borchers, Washington Post: “Conservative media – and NPR – entertain the possibility of a Hillary Clinton replacement

Grant Gerlock / Harvest Public Media

When shoppers browse meat at the grocery store they are confronted with all kinds of brands and labels, making it hard to tell whether the meat they buy comes from animals that were raised humanely. Organic producers want to answer that question more clearly, but conventional farmers are charging that proposed changes to organic standards would amount to unfair government backing of the organic industry.

It's been two months since former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson filed her sexual harassment suit against Roger Ailes and Fox News. Now, the network has announced a settlement – and it’s disclosing the details. Also, what’s the role of a debate moderator and the shortest story in the history of the New York Times. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Image courtesy of Fox News Channel

It's been two months since former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson filed her sexual harassment suit against Roger Ailes and Fox News. Today, the network announced a settlement.

Erik Wemple, Washington Post: “Fox News has settled Gretchen Carlson’s sexual harassment suit for $20 million

Poor white people have been in the news a lot lately.  Most obviously they are a target voting group and natural constituency for Donald Trump.  But they are also the subject of some interesting recent non-fiction books.  One memoir entitled Hillbilly Elegy by a guy who grew up in rural Kentucky is actually a best seller, and a couple of others have had a real impact on how people think about this very large group of Americans.

The redoubtable conservative activist Phyllis Schlafly, who led a movement that for decades successfully thwarted liberal and feminist causes, including the Equal Rights Amendment, and helped uber-conservative candidates win elections, has died. She was 92.

Mrs. Schlafly died Monday afternoon at her Ladue home, surrounded by her family. She had been battling cancer, said daughter Anne Cori.

Mrs. Schlafly was a self-described “lifetime fulltime volunteer in public policymaking.” Although she held three degrees, including a law degree, and worked her entire life, albeit most of it without pay, she championed the role of full-time homemaker as a woman’s highest calling.

claire mccaskill
studio08denver / flickr

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill has confirmed that she'll run for re-election in 2018.

The Springfield News-Leader reports the Missouri Democrat said Tuesday while visiting a National Guard facility at Springfield-Branson National Airport that she'll be "asking for another tour."

A McCaskill spokesman confirmed she intends to seek re-election.

Voters first elected McCaskill to the Senate in 2006. She defeated Republican Rep. Todd Akin to win re-election in 2012. She underwent breast cancer treatment this year, including surgery.

  The Associated Press reports that more than half of the meetings Hillary Clinton held during her time as Secretary of State were with parties who donated to the Clinton Foundation. Is their analysis an accurate representation of the data? Also, what happened when Facebook dropped its Trending Topics team, a USA Today report that gives some credence to Ryan Lochte’s story and a career development initiative designed to bring diverse candidates to newsrooms across the country. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

marcn/FLICKR

The Associated Press reports that more than half of the meetings Hillary Clinton held during her time as Secretary of State were with parties who donated to the Clinton Foundation. Is their analysis an accurate representation of the data?

Jeff Jarvis: “Specimens of old journalism

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Aug. 28 means  that most of Missouri's new laws passed earlier this year are now in effect.

For years, WikiLeaks has been known for it’s crusade against government secrecy. But, the Associated Press reports that innocent, private citizens have had very personal information published online. Why would the agency publish medical record, name child rape victims or out gay men in Saudi Arabia? Also, another major shakeup in the Trump campaign, the end of Gawker, and Ryan Lochte’s fall from grace. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Have you noticed one of the side effects of reality TV?  I guess people actually watch “Naked and Afraid” and “My 600-pound Self”.  I only know about these shows because I surf past them on the way to professional cage fighting and Real Housewives of Las Vegas.  Just kidding about cage fighting.  But seriously, this programming makes voyeurs out of normal people, but more importantly, causes them to think differently about their social and political worlds.

For years, WikiLeaks has been known for it’s crusade against government secrecy. But, the Associated Press reports that innocent, private citizens have had very personal information published online. Why would the agency publish medical record, name child rape victims or out gay men in Saudi Arabia?

Raphael Satter & Maggie Michael, Associated Press: “Private lives exposed as WikiLeaks spills its secrets

JASON ROSENBAUM | ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

The top prosecutor in the city of St. Louis said she’s skeptical about the cries of poverty from Missouri’s public defenders.

 

Earlier this month, Michael Barrett, the director of the Missouri public defender system assigned Gov. Jay Nixon to a case in Cole County. Barrett blames Nixon, a Democrat, for underfunding the system.

 

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has tapped two veteran GOP operatives to head up his state operation.

Aaron Willard, who has held several key posts in the Republican-controlled General Assembly, is Trump’s new state director. Todd Abrajano, a consultant with similar GOP ties, is to serve as Trump’s communications director.

ALEX HEUER / ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

Eric Greitens has received $1 million from the Republican Governors Association for his Missouri gubernatorial campaign.

The contribution comes about a week after Greitens prevailed in a four-way Republican primary. It could help him replenish his finances for the Nov. 8 general election against Democratic Attorney General Chris Koster.

The most recent reports show Greitens had $628,000 in his campaign account as of July 21. Since then, he has received at least $1.5 million in donations of more than $5,000 each.

It’s been less than two weeks since Missouri voters chose nominees for governor. And it’s fair to say that neither candidate wasted much time in fashioning their general election message — or sharply questioning their opponent’s worthiness.

This reporter spent the past few days watching and listening to Chris Koster and Eric Greitens' post-primary speeches. And from what the two men are saying on the stump, Missourians are in for a very contentious campaign — and discourse that may appear familiar.

John Oliver summed it up succinctly on Sunday night’s episode of Last Week Tonight, “the media is a food chain which would fall apart without local newspapers.” We’ll talk about Oliver’s harsh words for the content creators and why so many reporters and editors are cheering him on. Also, a look of the best –and the worst – of the coverage of the Olympic games in Rio and Fox News after Roger Ailes. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


Commentary: Grading the Major Party Conventions

Aug 9, 2016

How did the parties do at the conventions?  Using the late journalist David Broder’s guide here’s how I think they did:

marijuana
LancerenoK / Flickr

A group backing medical marijuana in Missouri says it doesn't have enough valid signatures but will go to court to get a proposed constitutional amendment on November's ballot. 

The frustrated director of Missouri’s underfunded public defender’s office has done something most unusual: He’s assigned a case to the governor.

The budget woes in Michael Barrett’s department are ongoing – too many poor people needing public defenders, too few lawyers to represent them. So he’s relying on a state law that appears to let him appoint any lawyer who's a member of the Missouri Bar to defend an indigent criminal defendant.

Enter Gov. Jay Nixon.

Jason Rosenbaum / St. Louis Public Radio

Former state lawmaker Judy Baker's quest to become Missouri's next state treasurer has advanced with her victory in the Democratic primary.

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