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Rowden keeps seat in lopsided victory

Nov 5, 2014
Jieyan Zheng / KBIA

While there were several close races for Republican candidates in Boone County Tuesday night, the 44th district was not one of them.

Chuck Basye wins the 47th District

Nov 5, 2014
Jenn Cooper / KBIA

The crowd at the Republican watch party at Inside Columbia Magazine grew more excited as Republicans gained the Senate majority.

Republican Rep. Caleb Rowden, the 44th District's State Representative, announced fellow Republican Chuck Basye as the winning candidate to represent Missouri's 47th District. Basye defeated Democrat John Wright by 263 votes. This will be Basye's first term as an elected official.

Throughout the night Basye said he was proud of his work and had no regrets whether he won or lost.

Tom Barclay / KBIA

Mayor Bob McDavid was in a solemn mood Tuesday evening after learning Columbia residents voted against a proposition that would have funded extra staff positions at the local police and fire departments.

60 percent of voters were against Proposition 1. The act would have increased property taxes by 30 cents for every $100 assessed to allow the city to hire more public safety officers. 

Kip Kendrick / Twitter

Three local candidates ran unopposed for state legislature seats this election.  Democrat Stephen Webber will serve his fourth term representing Missouri’s 46th District.

Caleb Jones, a Republican will serve his third term representing the state’s 50th district.  He’s thankful for the support of his constituents through his first two terms. 

“I’ve tried to do what’s best for the district and keep the voters thoughts and desires in mind whenever we were making decisions down there,” he said.

Austin Federa / KBIA

Over the weekend, the Associated Press published a report based on recordings it obtained that make it appear the no-fly zone established over Ferguson, Missouri was aimed at keeping the media out.

Jack Gillum & Joan Lowy, Associated Press: “AP Exclusive: Ferguson no-fly zone aimed at media

vote here sign
KBIA file photo

The Missouri Secretary of State predicts that only 40 percent of Missourians will vote.  MU Professor of Political Science Marvin Overby thinks age could be a factor in the low numbers.

“Older people tend to have more essentially at stake in a given election," Overby said. "Especially when there are matters on the ballot like taxes, raising homeowner rates. Younger people are less likely to have a financial investment in a community, less likely to be taxpayers and therefore find themselves less motivated to vote.”

Join KBIA for our live coverage of the midterm elections this evening. We'll update this live blog throughout the evening, and live on-air at 7pm.

[View the story "Missouri midterm Elections, 2014" on Storify]

Marjie Kennedy / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Republicans are expected to hold on to their majorities in the Missouri House and Senate, but the strength of their numbers could determine how much they can accomplish.

Half of the 34 Senate seats and all 163 House seats are up for election Tuesday.

Kyle Stokes / KBIA

Missouri's local election authorities are expecting about 40 percent of registered voters to cast ballots in Tuesday's elections.

The voter turnout predictions are compiled by the secretary of state's office from figures submitted by local clerks and election officials. They are based on rolls showing more than 4 million registered voters in Missouri.

401 (K) 2013 / FLICKR

Over the past week more than 90 contributions totaling more than $1.5 million dollars were made to political campaigns in Missouri as a last minute effort to reach voters before the election on November 4th according to the Associated Press. Political Science Professor at the University of Missouri Peverill Squire said these last minute donations are not out of the ordinary.

Marjie Kennedy / Flickr

On this week's Intersection, we will be discussing the November 4th ballot with guests from the Associated Press and The Missourian. 

The Mid-term election is tomorrow. Four amendments will be on the statewide ballot, and Republicans will look to maintain their veto-proof majority in the state legislature. One of the contested races generating some buzz is right here in Mid-Missouri. 

I had just walked off a cruise ship on a refreshing winter vacation, and was walking to the ship’s long-term parking lot in New Orleans. In a sun-soaked daze, I noticed a car with an official Missouri State Senate license plate, and chuckled. Small world.

A voter report card mailer is grading residents on how often they vote compared to their neighbors and some Missourians aren't happy.

Jason Rojas / Flickr

The embattled police chief of the suburban St. Louis town where a white officer's fatal shooting of a black 18-year-old remains under investigation has criticized Attorney General Eric Holder's recent call for "wholesale change" in the department.

Fulton proposes 2015 budget

Oct 30, 2014
Adams Building in Fulton
KBIA

The 2015 budget for Fulton, Missouri was proposed where it had its first reading at Tuesday night's city council meeting.  The budget will have to be read two more times before it can be passed. 

The budget includes the city's plan to go into debt in 2015. 

Bill Johnson, the Director of Administration said while there are multiple improvement projects, two projects in particular will be primarily responsible for leading the city into debt.

j.stephenconn / flickr

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) - A voter report card mailer is grading residents on how often they vote compared to their neighbors and some Missourians aren't happy.

Grow Missouri sent the mailers the week before the Nov. 4 election to spur residents into voting during the first general election in nearly a quarter-century featuring no race for president, U.S. Senate or governor.

The group is financed by investment firm founder Rex Sinquefield, the state's most prominent political donor.

  Were a forensic expert’s opinions taken out of context in the reporting of the findings of Michael Brown’s autopsy? Nearly a week after publication, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch printed a clarification of Dr. Judy Melinek’s interpretation of the report. Documents show the FBI co-opted the Seattle Times website to capture a teen suspected of bomb threats at a high school, why pressure from a gubernatorial candidate led to a Chicago Sun-Times reporter’s resignation and what sets apart breaking news coverage in Canada. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

District 44 candidates campaign for November

Oct 29, 2014
Alyssa Casares / KBIA

The race for the 44th district House of Representatives seat this November pits two native Missourians.

Missouri completes disparity study

Oct 28, 2014
stephenconn / Flickr

The Missouri Office of Administration recently completed its 2014 disparity study. The study was conducted by independent contractor Colette Holt and Associates.

“The goal of the study is to determine whether the State of Missouri is fully utilizing minority and women-owned business enterprises in government contracts,” said Ryan Burns, public information officer at the State of Missouri Office of Administration.

steakpinball / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Brian Stumpe says his experience with a robbery inspired him to run for Cole County Circuit judge, coincidentally against the woman who sentenced his attacker to 99 years in prison.

The Republican faces incumbent Democrat Pat Joyce, a Cole County judge since 1994 who's running on experience.

Talking Politics: Amendments, amendments, amendments

Oct 28, 2014
vote here sign
KBIA file photo

In this episode of Talking Politics, Prof. Terry Smith gives us an overview of what to expect from next week's midterm elections.

Eli Yokley of PoliticMo joined us this week to discuss Amendment 2, Amendment 6 and Amendment 10, which will each appear on ballots across Missouri next week.  They deal with everything from the use of certain types of evidence in court to the governor's ability to limit spending.

Shawn Semmler / Flickr

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Seven school districts have asked the St. Louis County prosecutor to wait until classes aren't in session to make any announcement about whether a grand jury decided charges were warranted in the Ferguson police shooting case.

Riverview Gardens School District Superintendent Scott Spurgeon last week sent Prosecutor Bob McCulloch a letter signed by six other superintendents asking that any announcement be made after 5 p.m. or on a weekend.

KBIA

Were a forensic expert’s opinions taken out of context in the reporting of the findings of Michael Brown’s autopsy? Nearly a week after publication, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch printed a clarification of Dr. Judy Melinek’s interpretation of the report.

A constitutional amendment on the Nov. 4 ballot could give Missouri voters access to early voting for the first time.

Missouri Constitutional Amendment 6 seeks to establish a six-day early voting period statewide. The period would not include weekends or time outside of normal business hours for polling places. 

Ballot language: 

A constitutional amendment on the Nov. 4 ballot could change the way sexual crimes are prosecuted in Missouri.

Constitutional Amendment 2 would allow previous relevant criminal activities to be admissible in court for crimes of a sexual nature against a minor. 

Ballot language:

A constitutional amendment on the Nov. 4 ballot seeks to drastically revamp teacher tenure based on student performance. 

Missouri Constitutional Amendment 3 would require that teachers' continued employment and pay be based on student performance evaluations and would change teacher contract lengths.

Ballot language:

Shall the Missouri Constitution be amended to:

A constitutional amendment on the Nov. 4 ballot could limit gubernatorial power over the state's budget. 

Missouri Constitutional Amendment 10 seeks to restrict the governor's power to withhold revenue based on projected budget shortfalls. It has quickly become one of the most politicized amendments on the ballot.

Ballot language:

Claire McCaskill
Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Top Missouri Democrats are continuing to pump money into state campaigns as the Nov. 4 election approaches.

State Senator Chappell critical of Nixon's plans

Oct 27, 2014
Missouri Senate

  State Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal continues to criticize the governor. She says Nixon’s plans for a new commission to study social unrest inflamed by Ferguson shooting come too late to help the community.

“The Governor and his approach should have occurred year ago if not 77 days ago," Chappelle-Nadal said. "To have a commission is very easy and simple to do. It is 'low hanging fruit.'”

Nixon's commission first order of business will be to conduct a study of underlying social and economic conditions that creates unrest in Ferguson.

rexsinquefield.org

Missouri's most generous political donor is hosting an election night fundraiser for Republican Senator Roy Blunt in St. Louis.

Blunt isn't up for re-election until 2016. But St. Louis Public Radio reports that financier Rex Sinquefield and his wife Jeanne are hosting an early-evening event on Nov. 4 for the incumbent at their Central West End home.

Tickets start at $1,000 and go as high as $10,400 a couple. The reception is scheduled to end when polls close at 7 p.m.

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