Politics

Political news

 A top Missouri business association is opposing legislation to create religious protections for some businesses objecting to gay marriage.

ALEX HEUER / St. Louis Public Radio

 Missouri gubernatorial candidate Eric Greitens' rivals want him to return $1 million to a donor accused of sexual abuse.

In most presidential election years, primary voters in Missouri and Illinois often wouldn’t have that much impact on picking potential commanders in chief.

But 2016 isn’t like most presidential years.

Updated March 15, 12:15 p.m. -- The slow-down in the Missouri Senate has entered its third day and forced Republicans to adjourn Tuesday after less than an hour in session.

Democrats began by forcing another full reading of the prior day's journal, which only took about 14 minutes.  Monday's journal reading was much longer, taking nearly an hour.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Many presidential candidates and their relatives are traveling through Missouri today and tomorrow. Heidi Cruz, the wife of Ted Cruz, was be in Columbia Friday evening, and in Maryland Heights near St. Louis Saturday.

Rene Artman is the Vice Chair of the St. Louis County Republican Central Committee, the organization hosting Heidi Cruz on Saturday. She said the flurry of visits to Missouri has made a positive impact and has been encouraging more people to vote.

Frustrated Missouri Democrats Delay Senate

Mar 10, 2016
state capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

Democrats are slowing down work in the Missouri Senate after Republicans broke up a 37-hour filibuster. 

missouri capitol
File Photo / KBIA

 

 A Missouri Senate committee has considered a bill that would allow public colleges and universities to launch a new post-graduate degree program without approval from another school.

Missouri Primary Turnout Projected at 34 Percent

Mar 10, 2016
Sully Fox / KBIA file photo

Missouri election officials are projecting that 34 percent of registered voters will cast ballots in next week's presidential primary.

It was a big weekend for the Jonathan B. Murray Center for Documentary Journalism at the True/False Film Festival. “Concerned Student 1950,” a film produced by three documentary students, premiered Saturday night. And, professor Robert Greene’s award-winning film “Kate Plays Christine” had its local debut. But, it was filmmaker Spike Lee’s appearance that stole the show. Also, a jury awards Erin Andrews $55 million in damages after a stalker filmed her through a hotel peephole, Hulk Hogan’s testimony in his defamation case against Gawker, and how Hugh Hefner single-handedly saved his high school newspaper. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Jeimmie Nevalga / KBIA

It was a big weekend for the Jonathan B. Murray Center for Documentary Journalism at the True/False Film Festival. “Concerned Student 1950,” a film produced by three documentary students, premiered Saturday night. And, professor Robert Greene’s award-winning film “Kate Plays Christine” had its local debut. But, it was filmmaker Spike Lee’s appearance that stole the show.

True/False: “Addition to the line up: Concerned Student 1950

Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

Lawmakers are considering whether to tax Missouri's drug dealers.

Sen. Wayne Wallingford told a Senate panel Thursday that dealers would face an additional charge of tax evasion if they are caught with more than 35 grams of marijuana, a gram of other drugs or a dosage of illegal substances without paying a tax. 

The run up to the Super Tuesday primaries was full of media news – from Donald Trump’s call to open up libel laws, to the Secret Service’s takedown of a TIME photographer, to a fake New York Times article announcing a key endorsement for Bernie Sanders. Also, Chris Rock’s performance at the Oscars, MSNBC cancels Melissa Harris-Perry and transparency into the firing of former MU professor Melissa Click. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Michael Vadon

The run up to the Super Tuesday primaries was full of media news – from Donald Trump’s call to open up libel laws, to the Secret Service’s takedown of a TIME photographer, to a fake New York Times article announcing a key endorsement for Bernie Sanders.

Alex Griswold, Mediaite: “Marco Rubio’s latest attacks on Trump are crude, beyond the pale, and absolutely genius

Talking Politics - Anthony Weiner Documentary

Mar 1, 2016
Cenetic Media

This story is part of True/False Conversations, a series of in-depth interviews with the filmmakers of this year's True/False Film Fest. Find the rest of them here or download the podcast on iTunes.

When directors Elyse Steinberg and Josh Kriegman heard that former New York congressman Anthony Weiner was planning to run for mayor of New York City, they saw it as an opportunity to create a documentary with the classic theme of “redemption.” Weiner was looking to rebuild his reputation after a sex scandal had forced him to resign from Congress two years earlier.

What no one, not even Steinberg or Kriegman, would have guessed was that in the middle of this comeback story, a second sex scandal would break and that their film “Weiner” would end up documenting the collapse of Weiner’s political aspirations once again.

I spoke with Sternberg and Kriegman on their film and how they were able to get Anthony Weiner to be so candid.


Former Missouri Lobbyist Accused of Sexual Harassment

Feb 25, 2016
forwardstl / flickr

 A judge has issued a restraining order blocking a former lobbyist accused of sexually harassing interns and employees from coming within 1,000 feet of the Missouri Capitol.

Apple CEO Tim Cook says the company won’t comply with an FBI request to remove certain security features from its iPhone, allowing law enforcement access to encrypted data. He’s got support from NSA leaker Edward Snowden, Google and WhatsApp. But, Microsoft founder Bill Gates said Apple should cooperate. Also, a damning report about the lack of diversity in Hollywood, why SB Nation pulled its profile of convicted rapist Daniel Holtzclaw, and the remembering author Harper Lee. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Gonzalo Baeza

Apple CEO Tim Cook says the company won’t comply with an FBI request to remove certain security features from its iPhone, allowing law enforcement access to encrypted data. He’s got support from NSA leaker Edward Snowden, Google and WhatsApp. But, Microsoft founder Bill Gates said Apple should cooperate.

File Photo / KBIA

A newly filed piece of legislation that would protect the first amendment rights of student journalists in Missouri public schools and colleges is making its way through the State House. Abby Kempf is a senior at Rock Bridge high school, and one of the editors-in-chief of the school’s journalism program.


j.stephenconn / flickr

Business, labor and civil rights groups are opposing a bill that would require all Missouri employers to use a federal program checking employees' authorization to legally work in the U.S.

Bill sponsor Rep. Rick Brattin told a House panel Monday that mandating participation in the E-Verify system is a quick and cheap way to ensure employers follow immigration laws. His bill would establish a three-strike system in which a business would lose its license the third time it hires someone unauthorized to work in the country.

Claire McCaskill
Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill says she has breast cancer.

The Democratic senator said in a blog post Monday that the cancer was detected through a regular mammogram and she will be in St. Louis for the next three weeks receiving treatment. She said "it's a little scary" but her prognosis is good and she expects a full recovery.

 A group of Columbia residents are putting together a petition to recall Fifth Ward Councilmember Laura Nauser.  

Missouri Senate Strips One-Year Lobbying Ban For Lawmakers

Feb 18, 2016
missouri capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

 Missouri senators have stripped a one-year ban on lobbying from a bill that's part of an effort to repair public trust in government.

MU Communications Professor Melissa Click broke her silence, telling her story to several local media outlets. But, her attempt to repair her image faced a new challenge Saturday, when the Columbia Missourian published video from the Homecoming parade. Also, how the media covered the death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, journalists making and accepting donations and some potentially revolutionary organizational changes coming to the BBC. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

MU Communications Professor Melissa Click broke her silence, telling her story to several local media outlets. But, her attempt to repair her image faced a new challenge Saturday, when the Columbia Missourian published video from the Homecoming parade.

Talking Politics- Ribbon Clerks Commentary

Feb 16, 2016
American flag
File Photo / KBIA

Welcome to Talking Politics. KBIA’s weekly show dedicated to talking about local and national politics. On this week’s show Dr. Terry Smith, KBIA’s regular political commentator and a political science professor at Columbia College is back in the studio with a commentary on what the term “ribbon clerks” means in the political arena. 

KBIA

 The City of Columbia Mayor's Task Force met Wednesday Afternoon to discuss the city's infrastructure.  No decisions were made but City Councilman Ian Thomas made a presentation about the city’s integrated management plan specifically looking at the possible need for an increase in the city’s development fee

House Approves More Lawmaker Control of Missouri Capitol

Feb 11, 2016
missouri capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

 Missouri lawmakers have voted to give themselves more control over the Capitol's renovations and security.

The House passed two bills Thursday that would create a commission to supervise the Capitol building and its police, security protocols and parking, as well as the adjacent government buildings. Those areas are currently under the supervision of the Office of Administration and the Department of Public Safety.

As the Zika virus moves north, journalists across America struggle to tell the story and raise awareness without feeding into the culture of fear. One in five people will contract it, yet few will become sick enough to ever see a doctor. So, why are we talking about the safety of the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro? Also, University of Kansas students sue over funding cuts at the University Daily Kansan, why editors at The Bustle are asking new employees deeply personal questions and an update from the Las Vegas Review-Journal. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Debra Mason: Views of the News.


via Flickr user coniferconifer

As the Zika virus moves north, journalists across America struggle to tell the story and raise awareness without feeding into the culture of fear. One in five people will contract it, yet few will become sick enough to ever see a doctor. So, why are we talking about the safety of the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro?

cindyt7070 / Flickr

Welcome to Talking Politics. KBIA’s weekly show dedicated to talking about local and national politics. Last week, the University of Missouri began its 18 month lecture series it’s calling The African American Experience in Missouri.


Pages