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A Missouri lawmaker is again pushing legislation that would shift regulation of farm-raised deer to state agriculture officials. 

ginny chadwick
Jack Howard / KBIA

Ginny Chadwick resigned from her seat as Columbia’s 1st Ward councilmember this week. 

Updated 4:45 p.m. May 5 with dismissal from federal court. A federal judge has ruled  that a grand juror who wants to speak out about the experiences of evaluating the evidence in the Michael Brown shooting should bring that case in state court.

A state lawmaker wants to increase the speed limit on Missouri's rural interstates and freeways from 70 mph.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Gov. Jay Nixon appointed two new members to the University of Missouri Board of Curators. Maurice B. Graham and Phillip H. Snowden, both democrats, have been appointed to join the board that oversees the four-campus system.

Claire McCaskilll
Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Three Missouri lawmakers are urging the Army Corps of Engineers to commit some recently approved funding for levee improvements in northwest Missouri.

j. stephenconn / Flickr

  A Missouri lawmaker is proposing the state create incentives for health clinics at rural schools. State Rep. Jay Barnes recently filed legislation to encourage health centers at schools with large populations of students from low-income families. 

ginny chadwick
Jack Howard / KBIA

An effort is underway to recall a Columbia councilmember who voted against a proposal to lessen penalties for marijuana cultivation. 

Missouri’s minimum wage will go up 15 cents as of New Year’s Day.

The increase from the current $7.50 to $7.65 is the result of a 2006 ballot referendum tying the state’s minimum wage to the Midwest Consumer Price Index. It’s the second 15 cent increase in as many years.

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has pardoned nine people convicted of nonviolent crimes.

j. stephenconn / Flickr

  Missouri lawmakers have mixed opinions about whether they can use a new constitutional amendment to override some of Governor Jay Nixon's budget cuts when they go into session in January. 

Claire McCaskilll
Kristofor Husted / KBIA

  U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill says Republicans have begun courting her and other moderate Democrats in hopes of avoiding filibusters in the next Congress. 

j. stephenconn / Flickr

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has released $4.6 million to give state employees a 1 percent raise.

Nixon on Wednesday announced the raises will kick in Jan. 1, and that he's also freeing $2 million to boost the state's tourism efforts.

Just after the sun set on Nov. 24 -- the day that Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson’s fate would be disclosed to the world -- Gov. Jay Nixon faced a throng of reporters at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. 

Appearing before cameras that would simulcast his words across the globe, the Democratic governor talked  at length about how law enforcement officials were ready to respond to the grand jury’s decision. 

The Missouri Gaming Commission will get a new executive director next year.

  A New York City high school student makes $72 million playing the stock market? The headline offered the promise of a story that was almost too good to be true. Turns out the teen, Mohammed Islam, made up the whole story. It joins an increasingly long list of prominent stories unraveling due to fact checking.  Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue on KBIA's media criticism program, "Views of the News."

rickbrattin.org

Mother Jones published an article Wednesday about Missouri House Bill 131, a bill proposed by Republican Rick Brattin from Harrisonville. It’s mandatory reading for what follows to make much sense.

Courtesy NBC

  When former Vice President Dick Cheney appeared on Meet the Press Sunday, he told moderator Chuck Todd that he approved of the CIA's interrogation techniques -- and said he'd use them all again "in a minute."

Some say those enhanced interrogation techniques, including waterboarding and rectal rehydration amount to torture. The release of the Senate's CIA interrogation report left many in the media wondering what terminology to use. Missouri School of Journalism professors Earnest Perry, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

school buses
KBIA

FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) — One of the school districts for students from Ferguson is facing a lawsuit alleging school board elections discriminate against black residents.

The American Civil Liberties Union and the NAACP announced the suit Thursday against the Ferguson-Florissant School District. It claims the district's at-large elections make it more difficult for blacks to be elected, even though the district serves more black families than whites.

The suit seeks elections where candidates are selected by ward or sub-district.

Attorney General's Office

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster is headed to St. Louis to discuss the region's troubled municipal courts.

The Jefferson City Democrat has scheduled a Thursday morning news conference to announce an unspecified action involving several municipalities in the county. He'll be joined by the Rev. Starsky Wilson and Rich McClure, who co-chair the state's Ferguson Commission.

Horia Varlan via Flickr

ST. LOUIS (AP) — In the aftermath of Michael Brown's death, legal activists suggested that some of the raw anger that erupted in suburban St. Louis had its roots in an unlikely place — traffic court.

It was there, they said, that low-income drivers sometimes saw their lives upended by minor infractions that led to larger problems. A $75 ticket for driving with expired tags, if left unpaid, could eventually bring an arrest warrant and even jail time.

j.stephenconn / flickr

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — A Missouri Republican is proposing that women be required to get notarized permission from the father to receive an abortion.

State Representative Rick Brattin of Harrisonville recently filed legislation requiring a father's consent except in cases of rape or incest.

  Are the CIA’s enhanced interrogation techniques torture? Former Vice President Dick Cheney gives Chuck Todd his definition of “torture” on Meet the Press. The Cosbys break their silence, MSNBC launches “The Shift” to test new programming online, and New York Magazine is duped by a high school student. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Earnest Perry: Views of the News.

Updated at 2:39 p.m. ET

President Obama announced today the most significant change in U.S. policy toward Cuba in more than 50 years, paving the way for the normalization of relations and the opening of a U.S. Embassy in Havana.

Obama said "we will end an outdated approach that for decades has failed to advance our interests and instead we will begin to normalize relations between our two countries."

Courtesy NBC

When former Vice President Dick Cheney appeared on Meet the Press Sunday, he told moderator Chuck Todd that he approved of the CIA's interrogation techniques -- and said he'd use them all again "in a minute."

Some say those enhanced interrogation techniques, including water boarding and rectal rehydration amount to torture. 

The release of the Senate's CIA interrogation report left many in the media wondering what terminology to use.

(This post was last updated at 2:07 p.m. ET.)

Taliban militants stormed a school in northwest Pakistan on Tuesday, leaving scores of students dead.

Quoting Pakistani officials, multiple media outlets say the death toll is at least 140, including at least 80 students in grades 1 through 10.

A little before 8 p.m. local time, police announced that the operation had ended after the gunmen were killed. Security personnel, police official Abdullah Khan told the AFP, were now in the process of sweeping the rest of the building.

One of the big, controversial questions to emerge from the Senate investigation into the CIA interrogation of terrorism suspects is this: Did President George W. Bush know the specific techniques used by the CIA to interrogate terrorism suspects?

File / KBIA

As of this afternoon, people under 21 years of age will not be able to purchase tobacco products or electronic cigarettes within Columbia city limits. 

Beth Lago

Getting messy for a cause.  That's what a couple of hundred or so folks did a couple of months back when they got up early on a Saturday morning and cleaned-up a stretch of the Missouri River near Boonville.

It was one of eight major clean-ups of the Missouri River in 2014 coordinated by the Columbia-based organization Missouri River Relief. 

Race is at the forefront of the current debate over the police use of deadly force. But one shooting in Wisconsin highlights another factor at play when police shoot civilians — the lack of outside investigation. And the decade-old death has led to real reform in the state.

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