Politics

Political news

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

A plan to use bonds for repairs to the Missouri Capitol, universities and other state-owned buildings is moving forward.

A House committee this week outlined how to spend more than $300 million in bonds for building maintenance and new construction.

The presidential hopefuls haven't spent much time so far with voters. Instead, they've committed many days to courting the millionaires and billionaires who can fuel a White House bid. And at the same time, activists on the left and right are seeking to redefine political corruption, which they believe this is.

This post was updated at 8:10 a.m. E.T. Monday

Updated at 2:10 p.m. ET

Hundreds in Baltimore began a "victory rally" to celebrate a decision by the city's top prosecutor to charge six officers in connection with the death of Freddie Gray, the young black man who died from a spinal injury he sustained in police custody.

The rally began at 2 p.m. in the West Baltimore neighborhood where Gray lived and was making its way to City Hall.

Missouri Supreme Court Seeks Improvements

May 1, 2015
Missouri Supreme Court
Americasroof / Wikimedia Commons

Changes could be made in Missouri courts due to a new study from the Missouri Supreme Court.

The goal of the study is to improve the practices and procedures of municipal courts throughout Missouri. The state Supreme Court is taking suggestions from the public and attorneys, which will be reviewed to determine what the appropriate next step will be.

Thorpe Obazee / Flickr

Legislators are sponsoring a bill in Missouri that would change the way infant care is handled at childcare facilities. The bill was developed after a child died at a daycare center in St. Louis County, under Senator Scott Sifton’s jurisdiction, and it is aimed at implementing stricter sleeping regulations for infants.

Roads in need of repair and expansion cost the average St. Louis-area driver $1,511 a year from car accidents, maintenance needs and wasted gas, according to a new report released Thursday by private transportation research group TRIP.

The report estimates that the average St. Louis driver spends 31 hours a year stuck in traffic and that almost 30 percent of the major roads in the St. Louis area need to be reconstructed because they’ve deteriorated beyond the scope of surface-level repair.

(Updated, 9:40 p.m. Thursday, April 30)

In a move long expected, Missouri Sen. Mike Parson, R-Bolivar, announced today that he’s running for Missouri governor in 2016.

And his top issue, he said in his kickoff address, "will be about protecting and fighting to expand the number one industry in our state - agriculture."

His entry also is expected to kick off a likely parade of rural GOP rivals.

The death of Freddie Gray was a homicide, and six Baltimore police officers now face criminal charges that include second-degree murder and involuntary manslaughter, Baltimore chief prosecutor Marilyn J. Mosby says.

Mosby announced the charges Friday morning, citing her office's "thorough and independent" investigation and the medical examiner's report on Gray's death. She said warrants were issued Friday for the officers' arrest.

World War I Veterans
File Photo / KBIA

  A constitutional amendment that aims to construct a new veteran’s nursing home is moving through the Missouri House. The House gave its initial approval on Wednesday, April 29. 

The measure would give Missouri voters the ability to decide on the creation of new bonds that would pay for the construction of this new home. Those bonds could total up to $50 million, which is the estimated cost of the project.

sylvar / Flickr

  The Missouri House approved a bill that will allow citizens to vote on the use of red light cameras.

The House met Wednesday, April 30 to approve a House Bill 207, sponsored by State Rep. Paul Curtman.

Curtman said he believes the use of red light cameras should banned in Missouri. He said there are municipalities in Missouri that have tried to redefine movement caught by a red light camera as a non-moving violation, a way for the municipalities to continue to collect fines without assigning points to licensed drivers.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders got into the presidential race Thursday, becoming Hillary Clinton's first official challenger for the Democratic nomination. His website has a disclaimer: "Paid for by Bernie not the billionaires."

Although he caucuses with the Democrats in the Senate, he's not a registered Democrat — he's actually the longest-serving independent in congressional history. (There's no rule, by the way, barring candidates who are not registered Democrats from running in the Democratic primary.)

Study Shows Women Journalists Burn Out Faster Than Men

Apr 30, 2015
Softmedia

The journalism field is demanding. The long, intense hours and news-never-ends-therefore-we-don't-stop mentality can lead to a burnout. A recent University of Kansas study shows that female workers are tending to leave the field earlier than their counterparts. University of Missouri professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss why that might be on the weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    

This post was updated at 6:10 p.m. ET May 26 to add Sanders' remarks at his official campaign kickoff.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders officially got in the race for president back in April, but he is holding his campaign kickoff Tuesday in Burlington, Vt., where he was once mayor.

WCIA-TV

Champaign, IL local TV personality and anchor Dave Benton shared saddening news with the audience. Benton is stricken with brain cancer, and last fall he announced doctors said he only had about six months to live. Benton continued anchoring until just recently when he declared he is unable to continue working due to a weakening eyesight. 

KOMUnews / Flickr

The Columbia Fire Department and Boone County Fire District are negotiating how they will divide responsibility for emergencies in and around Columbia. Currently, the two departments respond jointly to calls in certain areas along city limits.

 


Scenes from Baltimore earlier this week have evoked the riots that broke out in many cities after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King in 1968. I spoke to two first responders who were on duty at the time, Ed Mattson, a retired sergeant from the Baltimore City Police who was in the tactical squad and riot squad in 1968, and Steve Souder, Director of Communications at Fairfax County Department of Public Safety. He was working in communications for the Washington D.C. Fire Department the day Dr. King died. It also made me think of my own father.

Students, faculty and members of the MU community gathered Tuesday for a panel discussion about the university’s role in working to end apartheid in South Africa. In the 1980s, students successfully pushed the MU board of curators to divest from American companies doing business in South Africa.

Kathryn Benson, who was heavily involved in the 1980s movement, said protestors built and occupied shantytowns on Francis Quadrangle after traditional protests failed. Benson said students took turns occupying the shanties from October 1986 through February of 1987.

A Mega Donor’s Influence in Missouri Politics

Apr 29, 2015
rexsinquefield.org

$34,648,778.27. That may sound like the contract your favorite professional sports player just signed with his new team. But that’s actually the amount of money one man donated to Missouri politicians and political groups from 2008-2014.

Rex Sinquefield is a retired businessman from St. Louis. He made his name and his wealth forming Dimensional Fund Advisors in 1981 where he worked until he retired in 2005. Since then, he has become one of the most, if not the most, influential political and philanthropic donor in Missouri.

Torie Ross / KBIA

Missouri's new Auditor Nicole Galloway has named two senior staffers to help her lead the office.

The Democrat on Tuesday announced Audit Director John Luetkemeyer has been promoted to deputy auditor. Michael Moorefield will serve as chief of staff.

This week's Baltimore riot could not have happened to a nicer city.

Baltimore residents welcome strangers and even call them "hon." They sit on benches painted with the slogan "The Greatest City in America."

Baltimore is also where people looted stores and burned cars Monday night. They did it when a man died a week after being arrested.

Courtesy NBC

Former Dateline NBC program, "To Catch a Predator" may make a comeback. The show was hosted by Chris Hansen where he and the civilian watchdog group, Perverted-Justice teamed up to lure people looking to have sex with minors. The last episode aired seven years ago, and Hansen is looking to bring the program back, but this time he'll call it, "Hansen vs. Predator."

Missouri School of Journalism professors and "Views of the News" hosts Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss Hansen's quest to harvest support through Kickstarter.

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    


Tony Webster / FLICKR

  A bill to limit police use of deadly force has advanced in the Missouri Senate, an effort aimed at addressing concerns raised after the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson.

The Missouri Senate gave initial approval to the bill Tuesday on a voice vote.

Current law justifies deadly force when an officer believes a suspect has committed or attempted a felony, is escaping with a deadly weapon or poses a serious threat of danger to others.

The bill would change part of that law to allow deadly force only if police reasonably believe the suspect has committed or tried to commit a violent felony.

The measure needs a second full Senate vote before it can move to the House.

Hillary Clinton's new logo has been much maligned. A simple, rightward-pointing "H" with a red arrow through it that looks like it could have been made with Microsoft Paint.

Red, the color of the other team. How could she? some Democrats wondered. It seemed so amateurish, some design experts lamented.

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Missouri senators have passed a measure calling for a constitutional convention to enact a balanced budget requirement for the federal government.

(Updated 4/28/2015, 11:58 a.m.)

Missouri Auditor Nicole Galloway has named her new senior staff.

In a press release issued Tuesday, she named John Luetkemeyer as Deputy State Auditor and Michael Moorefield as Chief of Staff.

Luetkemeyer has been with the Missouri Auditor's office since 1981.  He was promoted to executive staff in 2008 under former Auditor Susan Montee, a Democrat, and also served as Director of State Audits under Tom Schweich, a Republican.

jay nixon
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has approved spending over $250 million more this fiscal year.

Nixon on Monday signed legislation that includes $120 million in additional general revenue spending. Nixon had requested the extra money, in part because lawmakers last year budgeted for an anticipated $50 million from a tobacco settlement that has not yet come.

Dr.Farouk / Flickr

  The Missouri House approved a measure Thursday to remove the cap on the number of times an aspiring doctor can retake the state medical exam. Currently, the state will not issue licenses to doctors after their third failed exam.

Rep. Keith Frederick, of Rolla, says other medical professions do not have such limits and that taking the exam multiple times does not reflect a physician's skill.

Some opponents have raised concerns that quality of care may suffer and patients may be put at risk. The measure now heads to the Senate.

Kirksville Restricts Usage of Sea Containers for Storage

Apr 24, 2015
Håkan Dahlström / Flickr

  The Kirksville City Council approved a series of restrictions over the usage of sea containers - large metal boxes used as accessory buildings for storage – on April 20. Kirksville residential property owners will not be able to permanently use these containers for storage anymore.

With three weeks left in the 2015 legislative session, Missouri lawmakers have passed all 13 bills that make up the state's $26 billion spending plan for Fiscal 2016, which begins July 1.

Pages