Politics

Political news

Missouri Senate Strips One-Year Lobbying Ban For Lawmakers

Feb 18, 2016
missouri capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

 Missouri senators have stripped a one-year ban on lobbying from a bill that's part of an effort to repair public trust in government.

MU Communications Professor Melissa Click broke her silence, telling her story to several local media outlets. But, her attempt to repair her image faced a new challenge Saturday, when the Columbia Missourian published video from the Homecoming parade. Also, how the media covered the death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, journalists making and accepting donations and some potentially revolutionary organizational changes coming to the BBC. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

MU Communications Professor Melissa Click broke her silence, telling her story to several local media outlets. But, her attempt to repair her image faced a new challenge Saturday, when the Columbia Missourian published video from the Homecoming parade.

Talking Politics- Ribbon Clerks Commentary

Feb 16, 2016
American flag
File Photo / KBIA

Welcome to Talking Politics. KBIA’s weekly show dedicated to talking about local and national politics. On this week’s show Dr. Terry Smith, KBIA’s regular political commentator and a political science professor at Columbia College is back in the studio with a commentary on what the term “ribbon clerks” means in the political arena. 

KBIA

 The City of Columbia Mayor's Task Force met Wednesday Afternoon to discuss the city's infrastructure.  No decisions were made but City Councilman Ian Thomas made a presentation about the city’s integrated management plan specifically looking at the possible need for an increase in the city’s development fee

House Approves More Lawmaker Control of Missouri Capitol

Feb 11, 2016
missouri capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

 Missouri lawmakers have voted to give themselves more control over the Capitol's renovations and security.

The House passed two bills Thursday that would create a commission to supervise the Capitol building and its police, security protocols and parking, as well as the adjacent government buildings. Those areas are currently under the supervision of the Office of Administration and the Department of Public Safety.

As the Zika virus moves north, journalists across America struggle to tell the story and raise awareness without feeding into the culture of fear. One in five people will contract it, yet few will become sick enough to ever see a doctor. So, why are we talking about the safety of the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro? Also, University of Kansas students sue over funding cuts at the University Daily Kansan, why editors at The Bustle are asking new employees deeply personal questions and an update from the Las Vegas Review-Journal. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Debra Mason: Views of the News.


via Flickr user coniferconifer

As the Zika virus moves north, journalists across America struggle to tell the story and raise awareness without feeding into the culture of fear. One in five people will contract it, yet few will become sick enough to ever see a doctor. So, why are we talking about the safety of the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro?

cindyt7070 / Flickr

Welcome to Talking Politics. KBIA’s weekly show dedicated to talking about local and national politics. Last week, the University of Missouri began its 18 month lecture series it’s calling The African American Experience in Missouri.


vote here sign
KBIA file photo

Two proposals aimed at requiring Missourians to show photo ID before voting are heading to the Senate floor.

j.stephenconn / flickr

A Missouri lawmaker is pushing for a program that would track prescription drugs and let doctors and pharmacists know when similar prescriptions for potentially addictive drugs have been filled.

The Iowa caucuses are over, and the nation’s attention turns to New Hampshire. What does Monday’s win mean for Ted Cruz, Donald Trump and Marco Rubio? And, how might a tight race on the Democratic side change the narrative? Also, a look at the coverage of the Flint, Michigan water contamination crisis, an Ohio judge sanctions an attorney for talking to the press, and a Connecticut newspaper shuts down its newsroom – but is still in daily production. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Tim Vos: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Stephen Cummings

The Iowa caucuses are over, and the nation’s attention turns to New Hampshire. What does Monday’s win mean for Ted Cruz, Donald Trump and Marco Rubio? And, how might a tight race on the Democratic side change the narrative?

Nick Baumann, Huffington Post: “Don’t let the media and Marco Rubio tell you he ‘won’ by finishing third in Iowa

Talking Politics - Analogy on Presidential Politics

Feb 2, 2016
Trains
The Wingy / Flickr

Welcome to Talking Politics, KBIA’s Weekly show dedicated to talking about local and national politics. Today Terry Smith, a Columbia College political science professor and regular political commentator for KBIA, returns to the show for a commentary about an analogy he sees between a childhood passion of his and today’s presidential politics. The transcription of Terry Smith's commentary is below.


Ryan Levi / KBIA

Americans owe more than $1.3 trillion in student debt, according to the Federal Reserve.

While much of this debt is owed to the federal government or private companies, State Representative Kip Kendrick (Columbia-D) said he has spent the last six months trying to figure out what can be done on the state level to provide Missouri borrowers with relief.

Adam Proctor / Flickr

Today the University of Missouri Interim Chancellor, Hank Foley, delivered the annual state of the university address. Foley announced an increase in regarding graduate student stipends.   

 “Beginning in July, July 1, 2016, our minimum stipend will rise by three thousand dollars a year to 15 thousand dollars,” Foley said.

He said the stipend that graduate students currently receive is well below the average of other higher learning institutions.

Missouri Senate discussing concealed weapons on college campuses

Jan 27, 2016
Jimmy Emerson, DVM / Flickr

JEFFERSON CITY — Missouri lawmakers have begun discussing whether to allow concealed weapons on college campuses.

A Senate committee began hearing testimony Wednesday on a bill that would only allow campuses to ban concealed weapons if the school posts armed guards and metal detectors at every entrance to every campus building.

Other bills in the House and Senate would also expand access to guns on campuses.

Will a judge buy it? A man convicted of threatening a California Islamic advocacy group claims binge-watching Fox News for a week following the Charlie Hebdo attacks made him do it. Also, the power of political polling, Bloomberg covering Bloomberg. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Debra Mason: Views of the News.

Courtesy KGTV

Will a judge buy it? A man convicted of threatening a California Islamic advocacy group claims binge-watching Fox News for a week following the Charlie Hebdo attacks made him do it.

Christopher Mathias, Huffington Post: “Did binge-watching Fox News inspire this man to threaten Muslims?

missouri capitol
File Photo / KBIA

Welcome to Talking Politics. KBIA’s weekly show dedicated to talking about local and national politics. On this week's Talking Politics, KBIA’s Sara Shahriari speaks with Missouri Senate President Pro Tem, Ron Richard, and got his take on some of the Missouri legislature’s most pressing issues. 

gavel
Flickr / steakpinball

The Missouri Senate has passed a bill that would add requirements for expert witnesses' testimony.

Senators voted 20-10 in favor of the bill Thursday. It now heads to the House.

File Photo / KBIA

Voters would need to show photo identification at the polls under a measure passed by the Missouri House.

House members voted 114-39 in favor of the bill Thursday. The vote fell along party lines.

For his final state budget, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is taking no risks.

His proposed budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1 features no grand gestures of setting up new programs, and calls for limited increases for the state’s current operations.

Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian is free and back with family and colleagues after 545 days in an Iranian prison. Several news agencies knew about diplomatic efforts to free him. So, why did they choose not to run the story until his release was secure? Also, the end of Al Jazeera America, Sean Penn says he’s “sad about the state of journalism in our country,” and Univision buys The Onion, really. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Stacey Woelfel: Views of the News.

Missouri Capitol
File Photo / KBIA

A proposed ban on lobbyist gifts to Missouri lawmakers and other public officials has approval from a House panel. 

A move to abolish the death penalty in the Show-Me State is getting a hearing before a Missouri Senate committee.

Senate Bill 816 is sponsored by Sen. Paul Weiland, R-Imperial. He told the committee on general laws that being a pro-life Republican should also include the end of life.

via Flickr user 2012 Pop Culture Geek

On February 28, all eyes will turn to Hollywood for the Academy Awards. Comedian Chris Rock is slated to host the telecast. But, pressure is mounting on him to join a boycott over the lack of diversity in this year's pool of nominees. Jada Pinkett Smith and Spike Lee are leading the charge for actors, directors and producers of color to simply stay home that night.

Claire McCaskill
Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Missouri's U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill is planning a hearing this week on the growing abuse of heroin and prescription painkillers. 

Missouri lawmakers will try to make the most of a short week, which could include the next batch of ethics bills.

The shorter work week is due to the Martin Luther King holiday, as well as Gov. Jay Nixon's State of the State Address Wednesday night.

Updated 5:49 p.m. Jan. 14 - In Missouri, it usually takes a few weeks or even a month for the first bills to be completely passed out of one chamber and sent to the other, but not this year.

The Missouri House fast-tracked four ethics bills and on Thursday passed them on to the Senate, during the first full week of the legislative session.

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