Politics

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Who Didn't Watch The Election Last Night?

Nov 9, 2016

We've spent most of the morning hearing from people who followed last night's election returns intently. But how about the people who actively avoided them? KBIA sent reporters Carter Woodiel, Hannah Haynes and Bram Sable-Smith out to find them.

Residents in Missouri's 47th District voted to reelect state Rep. Chuck Basye, R-Rocheport, to his second term in political office. The victory came after his opponent, Democratic retired teacher Susan McClintic, conceded the race to the incumbent representative on Tuesday's election night. But memories of Basye's of his narrow win over John Wright in 2014's race had him a bit uneasy before the election. 

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Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler has been elected as the Representative for the Fourth District of Missouri. She based her campaign on a platform of agricultural issues, healthcare, and federal government involvement.

She is critical of the Affordable Care Act and seeks to limit the powers of the measure. Hartzler is a member of the Armed Services committee in the Missouri House of Reps.

Hartzler,  a supporter of Donald Trump says she thinks he will "bring real change that Washington needs and so I hope that by the end of the night, he ends up prevailing. We don’t need four more years of the economy being stagnant, and with failed foreign policy that Hillary Clinton will bring with her.”

Commentary: Predicting Election Day Winners

Nov 8, 2016
Sully Fox / KBIA file photo

Here are some predictions about the election.  The sell-by date is close-of-business today, no refunds, and the product is guaranteed to be either delicious or rotten.

Partly because Trump will run strongly in Missouri, Senator Blunt will be narrowly reelected.  Jason Kander has run an impressive race and has a promising future in Democratic politics, win or lose.

All of Missouri’s U. S. Representatives will be comfortably reelected.

Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

Missouri is looking to hire a new chief financial officer. The State Treasurer’s office is one of the five executive positions up for grabs on Tuesday, Nov. 8.

Three candidates are running for the treasurer’s office: Republican Eric Schmitt, Democrat Judy Baker and Libertarian Sean O'Toole.

Judy Baker is a former state representative. Her platform for state treasurer centers improving food security, access to banking services in underserved areas and cutting back on income inequality.

Talking Politics: Unopposed mid-Missouri Candidates Pay the Price for Political Marketing

Nov 7, 2016

The Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton campaigns had spent an estimated $150 million combined on advertisements by September of the 2016 presidential election, according to Advertising Age. It’s safe to say politics and marketing go hand in hand, especially when clear opposition exists between candidates.

But the close relationship between politics and marketing is tricky. A single marketing choice can have lasting consequences, and candidates will pay a pretty penny to avoid a choice that results in a campaign catastrophe.

Talking Politics : Missouri Campaign Finance Reform Raises Concerns

Nov 7, 2016

Missouri is one of only 12 states that does not have limits on campaign finance.

On Nov. 8, citizens will be voting on five amendments to the Missouri Constitution. Amendment 2 will establish limits on campaign contributions to candidates seeking office. If put in place, individual donors in Missouri will no longer be able to donate millions to campaigns. Currently, donors can give any amount they see fit as long as they follow the rules established by the Missouri Ethics Commission.

Talking Politics: Missouri Tobacco Tax Increase Fails To Decrease Smoking Rates

Nov 7, 2016
Yutao Chen

Jordan Hester is a sales associate at We B Smokin & Drinkin in Jefferson City, Missouri and has been a smoker for 12 years. He spends his days selling the one thing that he is trying to quit: cigarettes.

Hester has worked there for two years, and is on a first-name basis with his customers. When there is an increase on the price of cigarettes, Hester is the first person to hear their complaints.

“They would notice a tax increase real quick,” Hester said. “They notice if you ring up a lighter too many.”

Talking Politics: Free-for-all Campaign Contributions Have End In Sight

Nov 7, 2016

Missouri has some of the most relaxed campaign contribution limits in the country, which is to say: None.  

Virginia, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Texas, Mississippi, Indiana, Iowa, Oregon, Utah, Alabama and Nebraska are the only other states with no limits as to who can donate, how much they can donate and how many times they can donate to a campaign.

After a few tough weeks for Donald Trump and his campaign, we’ll look at a few issues that have put a thorn in Hillary Clinton’s side. Also, the exchange between Megyn Kelly and Newt Gingrich, Gannett drops its bid for Tronc, racist advertising practices on Facebook and the end of Twitter’s Vine. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

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As a farmer and a member of the House Agricultural Committee, Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler’s stance on agricultural issues are often tied with her desire for less federal government involvement in state issues.

She said restrictions from organizations like the Environmental Protection Agency are taking money away from Missouri farmers. Hartzler pointed to changes in certain EPA regulations, such as the Waters of the U.S. These changes have made it, she said, so that “the federal government will control ninety-nine percent of the land.”  

In the early years of his political career,  U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt had a reputation as a reformer. 

In 1992, Blunt — then Missouri secretary of state — ran a stunning ad that accused fellow Republican Bill Webster of engaging in “pay to play” in the Missouri attorney general’s office.

Advertising on Facebook? You have the option to target your ad to reach the audience YOU want to reach. But, what happens when your choices could constitute breaking the law?

Julia Angwin & Terry Parris, Jr., ProPublica: “Facebook lets advertisers exclude users by race

Gillian B. White, The Atlantic: “How Facebook’s ad tool fails to protect civil rights

Next week I’ll give you most of my predictions for key elections.  I’ll give you one today: Hillary Clinton will win the presidential election. 

I realize this revelation will send few of you to the fainting couch.  Most observers are predicting this outcome, and with good reason.

I have my reasons as well and I thought I’d look back at how I’ve been tracking the presidential race from this spot on the dial over the last year.

Last October I said: “Candidates who have the best organizations usually prevail.”  Yes, that’s one of the reasons Clinton will win.

On a special edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio's Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies are honored to welcome Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon to the program.

The two-term Democrat spent more than an hour discussing his legacy as the state's chief executive — and provided in-depth insight into how he faced crisis while in office.

Missouri Republicans have spent roughly a decade trying to implement a requirement that voters show government-issued photo identification before they can cast a ballot. After numerous starts and stops, the GOP is one public vote away from achieving a long-standing public policy goal.

Amendment 6 would authorize Missouri lawmakers to pass a photo ID statute. The constitutional change is needed because the Missouri Supreme Court years earlier had tossed out photo-ID mandates, saying they violated the state constitution.

Next Tuesday’s election could showcase whether the House Republican supermajority is wave-proof.

After the House GOP shot way past the 109-member supermajority threshold in 2014, Missouri Republicans may be in their strongest legislative position ever in the General Assembly’s lower chamber. And since Republicans represent some Democratic-leaning seats, it stands to reason that the party will face a challenge this year to retain the status quo – especially if GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump underperforms in the Show Me State.

  Dr. Gordon Christensen is a newcomer to the political scene. He’s running on the Democratic ticket as challenger to Missouri’s Fourth District Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler.

Christensen is a physician and retired professor from the University of Missouri in Columbia. While this is his first time running for political office, Christensen served as chief of staff of the University of Missouri Hospital and as MU faculty council chair.

The closer we get to Election Day, the hotter the rhetoric gets. We rely on our news media to cut through the clutter and put it all into context. But, where do the opinions end and the true reporting begin?

The closer we get to Election Day, the hotter the rhetoric gets. We rely on our news media to cut through the clutter and put it all into context. But, where do the opinions end and the true reporting begin?

For the first time in 12 years, someone besides Peter Kinder will be lieutenant governor of Missouri.

Kinder jumped into the governor's race and lost in a crowded Republican primary, coming in third in a contest won by Eric Greitens. The major party candidates on the Nov. 8 ballot are Democrat Russ Carnahan and Republican Mike Parson.

On the latest edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies are pleased to welcome back Democratic attorney general nominee Teresa Hensley to the program.

Hensley is squaring off against Republican Josh Hawley in the general election for attorney general. Hawley recorded an episode of the podcast last week that can be found here.

Updated to link to Hensley podcast - On the latest edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome back Republican attorney general nominee Josh Hawley to the program.

Hawley won the GOP primary for attorney general over state Sen. Kurt Schaefer by a landslide. He will square off against Democratic attorney general nominee Teresa Hensley, who is slated to record an episode of Politically Speaking next week.

For roughly a decade, the Democratic gubernatorial nominee was a firm opponent of campaign donation limits. When he voted to get rid of contribution curbs as a Republican state senator in 2006 and a Democratic state senator in 2008, he believed that an unlimited system would give Missourians a better sense of where money came from and where it was going.

But  Chris Koster abandoned his long-standing opposition to donation limits earlier this year and threw his support behind a proposed constitutional amendment that limits contributions to $2,600 for state-based offices. He says that the current system where million-dollar donations are relatively commonplace is completely out of control.

It’s mid-afternoon in a VFW Hall in Overland, and Eric Greitens has a room full of veterans at full attention. Two Medal of Honor recipients, Michael Thornton and Thomas Norris, just introduced Greitens, and he’s about to provide the crowd with details about his newest mission: Becoming governor of Missouri.

On campaign stops like these, the uniform of the former Navy SEAL is often a blazer, an Oxford-cloth shirt with no tie, and jeans. His speech delivery is disciplined, sharp and deliberate: At town halls and debates, Greitens argues that Jefferson City’s political class has faltered and failed.

In a sign of how competitive Missouri’s U.S. Senate contest has become, the two major candidates – Republican incumbent Roy Blunt and Democrat Jason Kander – held dueling roundtables with area military veterans.

Wednesday’s events were intended to underscore how both men are highlighting their armed services credentials, and emphasizing their concern about the problems facing the nation’s military.

Nine years ago, Chris Koster was a state senator, a former Cass County prosecutor and a rising star within the Missouri Republican Party. Many speculated he would eventually run for governor.

And now he is running for governor, but as a Democrat.

Koster switched parties in 2007,  a stunning move that has set the course for his unusual political career.  He remains the highest-profile politician in Missouri, at least in modern times, to have made such a move

We’re less than three weeks from the presidential election and the rhetoric is getting hotter by the day. On this week’s program, our panelists will analyze the long-term effects of the “Access Hollywood” tape, how endorsements and predictions might influence the electorate, and why Donald Trump wants Saturday Night Live off the air. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Rod Gelatt and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Is it November 8 yet?

 

On the Planet Tralfamador Americans are tuning into presidential debates that are enlightening, illuminating and helpful to voters.  There, on the other side of the galaxy, Americans are watching ads on TV and social media that are professionally and substantively addressing the issues that separate the candidates. There Americans are turning out to vote in record numbers in a national show of civic pride and duty.

 

 

via Flickr user justgrimes

We’re less than three weeks from the presidential election and the rhetoric is getting hotter by the day. On this week’s program, our panelists will analyze the long-term effects of the “Access Hollywood” tape, how endorsements and predictions might influence the electorate, and why Donald Trump wants Saturday Night Live off the air.

The New York Times: “The New York Times lawyer responds to Donald Trump

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