Politics

Political news

On the latest edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies are pleased to welcome Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder back to the show for the third time.

Originally from Cape Girardeau, Kinder is rounding out roughly 24 years in elected state government. He served three terms in the Missouri Senate, eventually becoming the first GOP Senate President Pro Tem in generations. Many Republicans credit Kinder for turning a largely Democratic Senate into a Republican stronghold. 

Kip Kendrick / Missouri House

Missouri Representative Kip Kendrick and six other House Democrats filed seven ethics reform bills last week. The proposed legislation includes creating new term limits, banning gifts from lobbyists and regulating campaign committees. KBIA’s Michaela Tucker spoke with Kendrick about the bills and the upcoming legislative session.

 


 

Name a magazine you think would be most likely to write an op-ed taking down President-Elect Donald Trump. The Atlantic? Time? U.S. News and World Report? Nope. Try Teen Vogue. This week on Views of the News, we talk about the sharp piece outlining the ways Trump used gaslighting techniques to win over his voter base. Also, Trump’s on-going role on NBC’s Celebrity Apprentice, reading the tea leaves on media cross-ownership and a look at a generation of children growing up on YouTube. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Via Flickr user Hanbyul

Name a magazine you think would be most likely to write an op-ed taking down President-Elect Donald Trump. The Atlantic? Time? U.S. News and World Report? Nope. Try Teen Vogue. This week on Views of the News, we talk about the sharp piece outlining the ways Trump used gaslighting techniques to win over his voter base.

Lauren Duca, Teen Vogue: “Donald Trump is gaslighting America

Sarah Kellogg/ KBIA

A month has passed since Donald Trump was elected as the 45th President of the United States. In these past few weeks, many Democrats and even some Republicans are wondering how this happened. Author Thomas Frank visited the University of Missouri a couple of days after the election and offered a few explanations.

Frank believes that there is no one complete reason as to why Trump won the nomination, but he believes that Trump understood how many Americans felt going into the election.

More than 35 people died in Friday night’s Oakland, Calif. warehouse fire. A distraught Derick Almena, the building’s landlord, appeared on The Today Show Tuesday hoping to apologize to the public. But, the interview took a quick turn when the co-hosts asked some pointed questions. Were they too hard on him? Or, where they asking the same questions investigators would likely ask? Also, the impact of fake news on private citizens, a CNN field producer is caught on tape making inappropriate jokes about President-elect Donald Trump. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy: NBC News

More than 35 people died in Friday night’s Oakland, Calif. warehouse fire. A distraught Derick Almena, the building’s landlord, appeared on The Today Show Tuesday hoping to apologize to the public. But, the interview took a quick turn when the co-hosts asked some pointed questions. Were they too hard on him? Or, where they asking the same questions investigators would likely ask?

Updated after Eric and Sheena Greitens' Tuesday press conference - Gov.-elect Eric Greitens is praising the quick work of law enforcement, and expressing sentiments of forgiveness, after Missouri's future First Lady was robbed at gunpoint on Monday night.

St. Louis police said in an emailed statement to St. Louis Public Radio that Sheena Greitens was sitting in her car near Cafe Ventana in St. Louis' Central West End neighborhood. Her car door was suddenly opened by a suspect, who then pointed a gun at Sheena Greitens and demanded her property. She gave the suspect her laptop and cell phone.

You could say that state Rep. Stephen Webber is used to getting questions about how his age parlays with his ability to succeed in politics.

While working at the Columbia Daily Tribune in 2008, I was the first reporter to call Webber when he announced his candidacy for a Columbia-based state House seat. He was 24 when he jumped into the race, the youngest possible age someone could be to run for the Missouri House.

For Missouri Legislators, Term Limits Can Create Openings and Obstacles

Dec 2, 2016

The clock starts ticking the day you’re elected into the Missouri legislature. If you’re lucky, you get eight years. Then term limits kick in and it’s time to find a new job. KBIA’s Hannah Haynes spoke to some of those term-limited legislators and found a bipartisan agreement: term limits have a downside.


What’s a journalist to do with the president-elect tweets baseless accusations about the validity of the election? This week, we’ll talk about how different national media outlets framed Donald Trump’s tweets about the Wisconsin recount, baseless accusations of voter fraud in three other states and citizens’ right to burn the U.S. flag. Also, covering the death Fidel Castro and some pretty shallow coverage of the standoff at the Standing Rock Reservation. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

What’s a journalist to do with the president-elect tweets baseless accusations about the validity of the election? This week, we’ll talk about how different national media outlets framed Donald Trump’s tweets about the Wisconsin recount, baseless accusations of voter fraud in three other states and citizens’ right to burn the U.S. flag.

gun
Drab Mayko / FLICKR

Missouri colleges may have to prepare for measures pushing for the concealed carry of guns on campus when the state Legislature convenes in 2017, despite opposition. 

Stunned by the magnitude of their Election Day losses, Missouri’s Democratic leaders are taking stock as they seek to regroup.

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., says she’s in the midst of “a listening tour’’ to gauge where she and other party activists went wrong, and what needs to be done. But McCaskill emphasized in an interview that she doesn’t buy into the narrative that Missouri Democrats were punished at the polls for ignoring rural voters and working-class whites.

Well.  I did not see this election coming.  I take no comfort in being in good company.  The evidence was in plain sight.  I chose to discount or ignore it, because I was wed to old ways of thinking.  Clearly many of the analytics we use in elections are obsolete or irrelevant or both.  This applies especially to polls, whose problems I have been talking about in this space for some time.

We’re learning the names of some of President-elect Trump’s first appointments. How should the news media cover those? And, when do you use terms like “alt-right” versus “white nationalist?” Also, Mark Zuckerberg’s response to the notion the spread of fake news on Facebook affected the outcome of the election, nonprofit news organizations see a rush of donations, and the death of Gwen Ifill. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy CBS

We’re learning the names of some of President-elect Trump’s first appointments. How should the news media cover those? And, when do you use terms like “alt-right” versus “white nationalist?”

Leslie Stahl, 60 Minutes: “President-elect Trump speaks to a divided country on 60 Minutes

Forget the pollsters, forget the prognosticators, forget the pundits.

They were all wrong.

Now that the election is behind us, our panel breaks down what happened in America’s newsrooms – how the coverage came together and where so many natural storylines were dropped. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Missouri voters passed Amendment 6 Tuesday to become the eighth state to require a photo ID to vote. 

Amendment 6, which requires voters to show a state, federal or military issued ID to cast a ballot, passed with 63 percent of the vote.

Sarah Kellogg

Residents all over the state of Missouri cast their ballot for the next president on Tuesday. In what’s been called one of the most polarizing elections in history, Residents at watch parties in Columbia and Jefferson City talked to KBIA reporters about their reactions to Donald Trump winning the presidency.

Michaela Tucker
KBIA

“This is crazy.”

The words of 10-year-old Elena Hoffman seemed to echo the sentiment of many of the partygoers at Ragtag Cinema’s election night watch party on November 8.

The party, which was billed as a bi-partisan gathering, drew mostly Clinton-supporters. Attendees could spend their evening waiting for results at either the bar, the large theater that aired CNN coverage or the small theater that aired the PBS telecast.

Tracy Lane, the executive director of Ragtag, estimated that nearly 200 people were in attendance by 8 p.m.

Who Didn't Watch The Election Last Night?

Nov 9, 2016

We've spent most of the morning hearing from people who followed last night's election returns intently. But how about the people who actively avoided them? KBIA sent reporters Carter Woodiel, Hannah Haynes and Bram Sable-Smith out to find them.

Residents in Missouri's 47th District voted to reelect state Rep. Chuck Basye, R-Rocheport, to his second term in political office. The victory came after his opponent, Democratic retired teacher Susan McClintic, conceded the race to the incumbent representative on Tuesday's election night. But memories of Basye's of his narrow win over John Wright in 2014's race had him a bit uneasy before the election. 

Photo Provided

Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler has been elected as the Representative for the Fourth District of Missouri. She based her campaign on a platform of agricultural issues, healthcare, and federal government involvement.

She is critical of the Affordable Care Act and seeks to limit the powers of the measure. Hartzler is a member of the Armed Services committee in the Missouri House of Reps.

Hartzler,  a supporter of Donald Trump says she thinks he will "bring real change that Washington needs and so I hope that by the end of the night, he ends up prevailing. We don’t need four more years of the economy being stagnant, and with failed foreign policy that Hillary Clinton will bring with her.”

Commentary: Predicting Election Day Winners

Nov 8, 2016
Sully Fox / KBIA file photo

Here are some predictions about the election.  The sell-by date is close-of-business today, no refunds, and the product is guaranteed to be either delicious or rotten.

Partly because Trump will run strongly in Missouri, Senator Blunt will be narrowly reelected.  Jason Kander has run an impressive race and has a promising future in Democratic politics, win or lose.

All of Missouri’s U. S. Representatives will be comfortably reelected.

Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

Missouri is looking to hire a new chief financial officer. The State Treasurer’s office is one of the five executive positions up for grabs on Tuesday, Nov. 8.

Three candidates are running for the treasurer’s office: Republican Eric Schmitt, Democrat Judy Baker and Libertarian Sean O'Toole.

Judy Baker is a former state representative. Her platform for state treasurer centers improving food security, access to banking services in underserved areas and cutting back on income inequality.

Talking Politics: Unopposed mid-Missouri Candidates Pay the Price for Political Marketing

Nov 7, 2016

The Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton campaigns had spent an estimated $150 million combined on advertisements by September of the 2016 presidential election, according to Advertising Age. It’s safe to say politics and marketing go hand in hand, especially when clear opposition exists between candidates.

But the close relationship between politics and marketing is tricky. A single marketing choice can have lasting consequences, and candidates will pay a pretty penny to avoid a choice that results in a campaign catastrophe.

Talking Politics : Missouri Campaign Finance Reform Raises Concerns

Nov 7, 2016

Missouri is one of only 12 states that does not have limits on campaign finance.

On Nov. 8, citizens will be voting on five amendments to the Missouri Constitution. Amendment 2 will establish limits on campaign contributions to candidates seeking office. If put in place, individual donors in Missouri will no longer be able to donate millions to campaigns. Currently, donors can give any amount they see fit as long as they follow the rules established by the Missouri Ethics Commission.

Talking Politics: Missouri Tobacco Tax Increase Fails To Decrease Smoking Rates

Nov 7, 2016
Yutao Chen

Jordan Hester is a sales associate at We B Smokin & Drinkin in Jefferson City, Missouri and has been a smoker for 12 years. He spends his days selling the one thing that he is trying to quit: cigarettes.

Hester has worked there for two years, and is on a first-name basis with his customers. When there is an increase on the price of cigarettes, Hester is the first person to hear their complaints.

“They would notice a tax increase real quick,” Hester said. “They notice if you ring up a lighter too many.”

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