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Courtesy NBC

Remember NBC’s franchise, “To Catch a Predator?” Chris Hansen does, and he hopes you do, too. The former network investigative reporter is launching a Kickstarter campaign to revive the one-time hit. If he’s successful in raising $400,000, his new program “Hansen vs. Predator” will run online while Hansen tries to sell it to a network.

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images_of_money / flickr

  A new audit claims Missouri owes the federal government $34 million for not complying with Medicaid regulations.

A U.S. Department of Health and Human Services audit set for release Tuesday shows Missouri didn't bill drug manufacturers for rebates.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that meant drug companies kept more money while there was less for Medicaid recipients.

The Missouri Department of Social Services oversees the program and says it disagrees with the audit.

A department spokeswoman says the amount owed is closer to $7 million.

It's been a year since Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy and his militia supporters stood down federal agents with the Bureau of Land Management outside Las Vegas.

Bundy owes more than $1 million in delinquent cattle grazing fees and penalties, but the BLM has stayed quiet in the year since the showdown, and Bundy's supporters marked the anniversary by throwing a party.

j. stephenconn / Flickr

Missouri's GOP-controlled Legislature is using its clout to push for limits to the state's social safety net.

Proposals nearing the end of the legislative process include a measure to tie the amount of time available for individuals to receive unemployment benefits to the state unemployment rate. Instead of the current 20 weeks, people could receive as little as 13 weeks of benefits.

When the former senator, secretary of state and first lady announced for president on Sunday she smiled into the camera and said, "I'm Hillary Clinton."

Those who were hoping for a return of Hillary's family name, "Rodham," as part of her public identity might have felt some disappointment. For many of her admirers, Hillary Rodham Clinton was the embodiment of aspiration for a woman in public life. This was the woman they wanted to elevate to the White House in her own right.

Marco Rubio, the charismatic, Hispanic, young (and even younger-looking) freshman senator from Florida is launching his campaign for the White House Monday in Miami.

Rubio, 43, will be entering a growing field of candidates. Right now, he's considered a second-tier candidate, polling behind Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, the man Rubio has called a mentor.

That could change once he gets in. Rubio's advisers believe he has a path to the nomination, with assets few other candidates can match.

via Flickr user Anthony Quintano

We are all C-SPAN now. Two new apps hit the market in the last few weeks that make it possible to live stream footage straight from your mobile phone, and share it through Twitter. Meerkat and Periscope are both free to download, and journalists are already starting to explore new ways to deliver content instantly. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on the weekly media criticism program, Views of the News. 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.  


The Future of Rolling Stone Discussed

Apr 11, 2015
Courtesy Rolling Stone

  A moment that will go down in journalism's history, the failure of Rolling Stone's article, "A Rape on Campus." Rolling Stone published its article last November, a story that depicted a brutal gang rape on University of Virginia student, "Jackie." The article resulted in a wave of controversy across the nation as factual errors began to arise. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on Views of the News and what's in store for Rolling Stone moving forward. 

j. stephenconn / Flickr

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon says increased state general revenues make some proposed budget cuts unnecessary, specifically those for foster children and people with mental illnesses.

David Shane / Flickr

  An executive at the Missouri Cattlemen's Association says Republican state Sen. Mike Parson is running for governor in 2016.

Nixon Signs Two Agriculture Bills Into Law

Apr 10, 2015
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

  Gov. Jay Nixon on Friday signed into law two agriculture bills aimed at making it easier for farmers to do business in Missouri.

Nixon signed the bills at a ceremony in Barry County, which is located southwest of Springfield.

Stephen Webber Announces 2016 Run for State Senate

Apr 10, 2015
Stephen Webber
Kristofor Husted / KBIA

Democrat Stephen Webber announced Thursday he will be running for State Senate in the 2016 election. A former Marine, Webber is currently on his second term as a member of the Missouri House of Representatives.

Eighty municipal courts in St. Louis County have agreed to levy identical fines and court fees for charges like speeding or driving without insurance.

Legislation designed to aid some delinquent taxpayers in Missouri is on its way to Gov. Jay Nixon's desk.

The House on Thursday overwhelmingly passed HB 384, the "tax amnesty" bill, which would allow people behind on their state income taxes to pay them off without additional penalties or interest.

Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

A bill providing an additional $120 million dollars in general funds for the 2015 fiscal year is moving forward in the Missouri House.

In Missouri, two political suicides have stunned the Republican Party. In February, state Auditor Tom Schweich, a leading candidate for the party's nomination for governor, shot himself. Then just last month, his press secretary, Spence Jackson, took his own life. The tragedies have sparked fresh scrutiny of Missouri's increasingly bruising political system.

Schweich launched his campaign for governor with a scathing broadside against the state's Republican Party establishment.

  Who is to blame for the journalism malpractice at Rolling Stone? The reporter? The editors? The fact-checkers? Jackie? Columbia Journalism School’s report into to “A Rape On Campus” is out, and it’s scathing. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean will talk about how it happened, why it happened and what can be done to prevent it from happening again.


j. stephenconn / Flickr

Missouri senators have narrowly passed a budget for state social services despite hours of late-night debate and filibusters.

The budget passed with the minimum 18 votes needed early Wednesday. Fifteen lawmakers voted against it.

In a first, the City Council in Ferguson, Mo., is now half white and half black, after voters added two more African-Americans to the six-member group. Voter turnout was reported at 30 percent in the majority-black community.

The voter turnout "surpasses recent municipal elections in Ferguson — and nearly doubles the roughly 16 percent turnout in the rest of St. Louis County," St. Louis Public Radio reports.

Betsy Peters Elected Sixth Ward Columbia Councilperson

Apr 8, 2015

In a tight Columbia city council race between Sixth ward candidates Betsy Peters and Ryan Euliss, Peters edged out Euliss by a mere 35 votes. Although the candidates ran on similar issues, like increasing the amount of safety personnel and improving infrastructure, they differed in their approach to representing the Sixth ward.

Euliss who took a city-wide approach said the issues that the Sixth Ward faces are similar to the Columbia’s as whole.


Voters accepted Columbia Water and Light’s request to increase electric utility taxes by 6% over the next five years along with the stormwater utilities suggested rate adjustment to address failing and inadequate storm water systems.

Mitch Richards is the spokesperson of Boone County for Liberty, which according to its website is a Missouri based Political Action Committee whose purpose is the advocacy of economic and civil liberties.

Tergin Wins Jefferson City Race for Mayor

Apr 7, 2015
Mary Kate Metivier

Jefferson City has a new mayor-elect after Election Day yesterday. Carrie Tergin celebrated her win during a watch party last night at Revel Catering and Events in downtown Jefferson City, with close friends and supporters. Tergin won the race for mayor with 41 percent.

Tergin said she was proud of the large amount of support she received from voters.

“To see the wide margin that I was able to achieve just really showed that this community does want to move forward,” Tergin said. “It shows they want leadership that sees the positive in Jefferson City and sees the opportunities that we have – and not to stay the same but to get better and move forward – and that’s what I’m about.”


Ruffin Wins First Ward City Council Seat, While Strong Campaigners Trail Behind

Apr 7, 2015
University of Missouri Department of Theatre

  Clyde Ruffin won the vacant First Ward Columbia City Council seat by a margin of 100 votes with 327 total votes. The race was highly contested with nine candidates running for the position.

Ruffin said there’s work to be done before he is sworn in on Monday, April 13.

He said his top priority once he’s sworn in is to prepare for his role on the city council.


    

Michael Trapp was reelected as the ward 2 councilmember with 52% of the vote.  He defeated Paul Love who also ran for Columbia mayor in 2010.  Trapp said he ran this campaign on his process of listening to all points of view before he makes a decision.  He knows there will always be critics but believes as a whole, the people of Columbia are happy. 

Jim Collier fills out his School Municipal Election ballot at the Columbia Public Library on Tuesday, April 7, 2015. Edit | Remove

Polling locations around Columbia had varying turnout for the School Municipal Elections on Tuesday, April 7, 2015. As of 3 p.m., some polling locations had several hundred voters while others had less than a hundred.

Nono Jost, an election official at the Columbia Public Library, said 280 voters had turned out so far.

Get the latest from KBIA's reporters on this election Tuesday. Follow our live blog as the results come in tonight. 

Courtesy Rolling Stone

The Columbia Journalism School issued a 12,600-plus word indictment of Rolling Stone's story, "A Rape on Campus."  The months-long investigation revealed a breakdown in the reporting, editing and fact-checking processes -- as reporter Sabrina Rubin Erdely put too much emphasis on an account provided to her by a single source, "Jackie." It also pointed to fatal flaws in the verification of her story prior to publication.

Rader Puts Final Campaign Effort into Greektown

Apr 7, 2015
Emerald O'Brien / KBIA

Dan Rader spent the final 12 hours of campaign time trying to get his name out, although in a less than conventional manner. Rader is running for Columbia’s First Ward City council seat against six other candidates, and he used bright blue shirts, buses touting signs and a man in a gorilla suit with a megaphone to set himself apart.

He and his campaign seemed focused on MU’s campus, and specifically Greektown.

This week’s Politically Speaking breaks some new ground. Through the magic of radio, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies joined with KBIA’s Bram Sable-Smith to interview state Rep. Caleb Rowden.

The Columbia Republican and Rock Bridge High School graduate was first elected to the Missouri House in 2012. Rowden had a somewhat unconventional road to Missouri state politics: He was a successful Christian rock musician before running for a vacant House seat in 2012.

I've rarely seen President Obama speak in such definite terms on a thorny issue as he did yesterday about the nuclear agreement with Iran.

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