Politics

Political news

Talking Politics - Voter Decision Making

Dec 8, 2015
Sean Hobson / Flickr

Welcome to Talking Politics. KBIA’s weekly show dedicated to talking about local and national politics.

On this week’s Talking Politics, Columbia College political science professor, Dr. Terry Smith, is here with a political commentary on voter’s choices and his thoughts on why some people seemingly vote against their own interests.

Dr. Smith is a regular political commentator for radio and television stations throughout Missouri, and has a vast knowledge surrounding the political arena.


File / KBIA

The 2015 Affordable Housing Symposium main event was the World Café Thursday evening with community members and organizations from Columbia and Mid-Missouri invited to discuss current and future affordable housing in Columbia. 

stephenconn / Flickr

 Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has ordered state agencies to identify any gender wage gaps and take action to ensure women are paid the same as men for the same work.

Flickr

Brian Treece announced Wednesday he will run for mayor of the City of Columbia.

Treece was appointed by the Columbia City Council in 2008 to serve on the first Downtown Columbia Leadership Council. Last year, the City Council asked the DLC to review infrastructure issues facing downtown Columbia, including recommendations to restore public confidence in the city’s planning process. Treece currently serves as the Chairman of the Downtown Leadership Council.

  

 

 

Twenty-nine-year-old Brandon Smith spends most of his time driving for Uber and Lyft, but the independent journalist’s relentless fight to make the video of Laquan McDonald’s death public is changing Chicago history. The unarmed black teen was shot 16 times by a white police officer. Now that officer is charged with first-degree murder. Also, Kobe Bryant announces his retirement from the NBA in the Players’ Tribune, ExxonMobile takes on Columbia University journalism students, claiming their reporting – on a potentially unethical business practice – was unethical, and why Christopher Kimball is leaving ‘America’s Test Kitchen.’ From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Chad Kainz

Twenty-nine-year-old Brandon Smith spends most of his time driving for Uber and Lyft, but the independent journalist’s relentless fight to make the video of Laquan McDonald’s death public is changing Chicago history. The unarmed black teen was shot 16 times by a white police officer. Now that officer is charged with first-degree murder.

Logan Layden / Harvest Public Media

Welcome to Talking Politics. KBIA’s weekly show dedicated to talking about local and national politics. 

On this week’s show Harvest Public Media's, Peggy Lowe, tells us how the U.S. Agriculture Department's computer system "MIDAS", which is meant to modernize how the government pays its farmers, is losing all of its momentum.

Peggy Lowe reports.


U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt criticized the president for his lack of leadership during a stop in Kansas City Tuesday. At the same time, President Barack Obama and French President François Hollande held a joint press conference and called for increased cooperation to fight the Islamic State.

“What happens when the United States fails to provide leadership in the world is bad things and more disruptive things fill that leadership vacuum,” says Blunt.

About a year ago, Missouri attorney General Chris Koster sued 13 municipalities in St. Louis County who weren’t complying with the state’s law on traffic revenue.

It was one of a series of cases at the state and local level filed against cities for the way they operate their municipal courts. And the architects of the strategy say it's working.

Missouri’s crowded GOP contest for governor has lost a participant, as state Sen. Bob Dixon is dropping out.

The departure of Dixon, R-Springfield, isn’t entirely unexpected. He was at the bottom of the pack when it came to fundraising. His last campaign finance report showed him with less than $83,000 in the bank.

Actor Charlie Sheen speaks out, telling Today Show anchor Matt Lauer he is HIV positive. The diagnosis came years ago, but Sheen said he’s speaking now to ease the stigma… and to put a stop to blackmail attempts from those threating to make the information public. Also, Mizzou makes more headlines, Geraldo Rivera’s reunion with his daughter following the Paris terror attacks, and extending the copyright on The Diary of Anne Frank. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Mike McKean and Jamie Grey: Views of the News.


via Flickr user Joella Marano

Actor Charlie Sheen revealed he is HIV positive during an appearance on the Today Show on Tuesday. He told Matt Lauer he was speaking out now to try and end a smear campaign against him... and to end the stigma associated with the virus. 

Eun Kyung Kim, TODAY: “Charlie Sheen reveals he’s HIV positive in TODAY Show exclusive

Talking Politics - 2016 Election Observations

Nov 17, 2015
Sully Fox / KBIA file photo

Welcome to Talking Politics. KBIA’s weekly show dedicated to talking about local and national politics. 

On this week’s Talking Politics, Columbia College political science professor Dr. Terry Smith is here telling us what he and other political commentators are observing in the local and national political arena leading up to the 2016 election season.


It’s been a historic week at the University of Missouri. On Monday, Tim Wolfe resigned as president of the UM System. Hours later, Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin announced he is stepping down from that office at the end of the year. We’ll look at local, regional and national media coverage, talk about challenges to the First Amendment, and examine the role of Mizzou Football. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Tyler Adkisson / KBIA

It’s been a historic week at the University of Missouri. On Monday, Tim Wolfe resigned as president of the UM System. Hours later, Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin announced he is stepping down from that office at the end of the year. We’ll look at local, regional and national media coverage, talk about challenges to the First Amendment, and examine the role of Mizzou Football.

A week after the last Republican presidential debate, the candidates and networks are still debating rules and procedures for future debates. What will it take to break the impasse? Also, Pandora picks up ‘Serial,’ South By Southwest tries, unsuccessfully, to dig out Gamergate session controversies, and KBIA adopts a full-time news format.. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

Courtesy CNBC

A week after the last Republican presidential debate, the candidates and networks are still debating rules and procedures for future debates. What will it take to break the impasse?

David Wiegel and Robert Costa, Washington Post: “GOP contenders demand greater control over crucial debates

Talking Politics - Using Soccer to Bridge Divides

Nov 3, 2015
danny jones / KBIA

This week on KBIA's "Talking Politics," Harvest Public Media's Poncie Rutsch tells us how one town in northeastern Colorado is using the sport of soccer to bring people of different backgrounds together.

Poncie Rutsch reports.


The organizers of the South By Southwest conference announced they’re canceling two sessions for the Spring 2016 conference. Both sessions were to focus on issues related to the Gamergate scandal, which centered on the depiction of women in the video gaming industry. Also, Vice President Joe Biden’s claims ‘people’ made up a ‘Hollywood moment’ between him and son Beau, covering Hillary Clinton’s Benghazi testimony, and what’s potentially behind those layoffs at ESPN. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The organizers of the South By Southwest conference announced they’re canceling two sessions for the Spring 2016 conference. Both sessions were to focus on issues related to the Gamergate scandal, which centered on the depiction of women in the video gaming industry.

Hugh Forrest, South by Southwest: “Strong Community Management: Why we canceled two panels for SXSW 2016

Talking Politics - Political Commentary

Oct 27, 2015
Vote Here sign
File Photo / KBIA

Welcome to Talking Politics. KBIA’s weekly show dedicated to talking about local and national politics.  On this week’s talking politics we've brought back Columbia College political science professor, Dr. Terry Smith.

This week he is here to point out some of the similarities he has noticed between the Volkswagen scandal and the upcoming 2016 presidential election and its nominees.


  One guy says the reporting isn’t accurate. Another says it is. It’s a case of finger pointing between Amazon vice president Jay Carney and New York Times executive editor Dean Baquet. What is the environment really like in the Amazon headquarters? Also, CNBC gets ‘Trump’ed, Cosby Kids Malcolm-Jamal Warner and Raven-Simone react to the November Ebony cover, and how the NFL Network became the butt of many jokes.  From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Wonderlane

One guy says the reporting isn’t accurate. Another says it is. It’s a case of finger pointing between Amazon vice president Jay Carney and New York Times executive editor Dean Baquet. What is the environment really like in the Amazon headquarters?

Jay Carney, Medium: “What the New York Times didn’t tell you

Talking Politics - Political Commentary

Oct 20, 2015
American flag
File Photo / KBIA

This week on KBIA's "Talking Politics" we’ve brought back a familiar voice and contributor, Dr. Terry Smith.

Dr. Smith is a regular political commentator for radio and television stations and is a political science professor at Columbia College.

Today, he tells us how the 2016 presidential election is shaping up and what some of the major differences are between the 2012 and the 2016 presidential race.


David Shane / Flickr

 Missouri's attorney general race is heating up as major donors pick sides in an expected Republican primary.

 

Flickr

Joplin School District officials say the district spent about $222 million rebuilding several schools and community safe rooms after the 2011 tornado.

The Joplin Globe reports district officials told the Board of Education on Tuesday the district is also financially stable.

Paul Barr, chief financial officer, says the district accumulated about $222 million in revenue after the May 2011 tornado, which killed 161 people and destroyed schools, homes and businesses.

For 62 years, people have been saying they read Playboy for the articles, but do they really? We’ll find out soon enough, now that the magazine’s decision to eliminate nude photographs. Also, Jason Rezaian’s guilty verdict in Iran, BuzzFeed goes “native” and a look back on the Democrats first debate. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Reuben Stern: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Matthew Hurst

For 62 years, people have been saying they read Playboy for the articles, but do they really? We’ll find out soon enough, now that the magazine’s decision to eliminate nude photographs.

Ravi Somaiya, New York Times: “Playboy to drop nudity as internet fills demand

New York Times: “Playboy in popular culture

Talking Politics - Kinder Gift Announcement

Oct 13, 2015

Last week, the University of Missouri received a multi-million dollar gift. This gift coincided with the university's public fundraising campaign called "Mizzou: Our Time to Lead." The campaign has the university setting out to raise $1.3 billion dollars in order to advance its "educational and research goals."

KBIA's Abigail Coursen reports.


Talking Politics - Kinder Gift Announcement

Oct 13, 2015

Last week, the University of Missouri received a multi-million dollar gift. This gift coincided with the university's public fundraising campaign called "Mizzou: Our Time to Lead." The campaign has the university setting out to raise $1.3 billion dollars in order to advance its "educational and research goals."

KBIA's Abigail Coursen reports.

Pages