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Verizon has announced it plans to buy AOL for $4.4 billion in an effort to drive the provider's mobile and over-the-top (OTT) video strategies. 

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

  A legislative panel has blocked Missouri's Department of Health and Senior Services from increasing wages for home care workers.

House members and representatives on the oversight committee voted 7-2 Tuesday to block the pay increase for workers who tend to aging Missourians and others who can't care for themselves.

The department rule would have increased the current $7.65 an hour minimum to $8.50 to $10.15 for home care workers.

But lawmakers said the department doesn't have the authority to increase those wages.

missouri house floor
File photo / KBIA

Opponents of a right-to-work measure packed the Capitol halls as Missouri's Republican leaders pushed to send the measure to Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon in the Legislature's final week.

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Lawmakers have passed a bill to stop the state from considering how much money a bidder would return to Missouri if awarded a contract to run a licensing office.

The House on Monday voted 146-5 in favor of the bill, which now heads to Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon's desk.

Why Words Matter in Media Coverage

May 12, 2015
via Wikimedia user Veggies

A term used to describe protesters in Baltimore is ruffling some feathers. Some are saying that "thug" is now synonymous with the n-word. Missouri School of journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the implications of the term on the weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    

Periscope: Advance or Hinder Transparency?

May 11, 2015
Flickr/ Tord Sollie

The Professional Golfers' Association of America revoked the media credentials of blogger Stephanie Wei. Wei used the live-streaming app Periscope to broadcast from a practice round of the WGC-Cadillac Match Play Championship in a way that the PGA said violated its terms.

Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on the weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    

WikiMedia user Dnd523

 CNN's chief medical correspondent, Dr. Sanjay Gupta performed brain surgery on an 8-year-old girl while on assignment covering the 7.8-magnitude earthquake. In fact, CNN filmed the procedure. Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the ethical issues behind this on the weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.    

Flickr/ Marc Nozell

The House Select Committee on Benghazi requested that Hillary Clinton appear twice, once on the use of her email system, and once on the Benghazi attack in 2012. Clinton's lawyer David E. Kendall rejected stating that Clinton is willing to appear once in a public hearing to discuss both issues. 

File / KBIA

A new $35 million headquarters for the State Historical Society of Missouri is included in a bill awaiting Governor Jay Nixon's signature.

The Columbia Missourian reports that preliminary plans call for the historical society to be moved out of the University of Missouri's Ellis Library and into a new building in downtown Columbia. Funding for the building is part of a bill that includes $376.7 million for capital improvement projects around the state.

stephenconn / Flickr

Missouri’s General Assembly has passed legislation that would limit city governments from passing certain policies.

Limits on monetary damages in medical malpractice lawsuits have been reinstated in Missouri.

Gov. Jay Nixon signed Senate Bill 239 into law Thursday at SSM Health St. Mary's Hospital in Jefferson City. The state's Supreme Court overturned the previous limits three years ago. Since 2005 they had been at $350,000.

Many Missouri state employees will have today off for Truman Day. Meantime, the anniversary of a landmark day of his presidency.

Updated 6:14 p.m. May 7 with comments from Gov. Jay Nixon and House Speaker John Diehl - Missouri lawmakers have sent Gov. Jay Nixon the first bill of the 2015 legislative session that deals with the fallout from last year’s unrest in Ferguson.  The House passed Senate Bill 5 today, 134-25, after the Senate overwhelmingly approved it Wednesday night.

Republican Warren Limmer sits in the second row of the Minnesota state Senate. He says more than 80 percent of his colleagues sit behind him. But he doesn't dare turn around to look at them when he gets up to speak.

He might get scolded. It has happened before.

"Then my cadence is thrown off," Limmer said. "I have to beg forgiveness to the Senate president. And then I'll get a slight admonishment, and then I can proceed."

Law enforcement officers have come under pressure over the past few months to rethink how they use deadly force, as a result of the string of videos of shootings by police.

But recently, police have been talking about another video — one that shows an officer not shooting.

File / KBIA

Missouri's Republican-controlled Legislature has passed a bill barring cities from adopting ordinances on plastic bags and employee benefits.

House members voted 105-48 Wednesday for the bill, which passed the Senate a day earlier. It now goes to Democratic Governor Jay Nixon.

  Cable companies and professional sports leagues say journalists live-streaming violates their copyright. How far will they go to stop it? And, how are reporters responding? Also, what happens when a journalist – who is also a surgeon – is sent to cover a natural disaster, how the New York Times customized a story just for you, an analysis of the coverage of Freddie Gray’s death and the Baltimore protests and more.

From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


File photo

A bill that aims to fix Missouri's flawed student transfer system will head to Gov. Jay Nixon.

Lawmakers passed the bill Tuesday night after hours of debate. The current transfer law requires struggling districts to pay tuition for students to switch to better-performing schools, which has caused a financial hardship for some. Legislators for years had worked to find a fix.

state capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

Missouri may be the next state to require high school students to undergo CPR training as a graduation requirement. New legislation is pushing a “hands only” training course. Students will be able to complete the program in 30 minutes or less and it will consist of an instructional DVD and manikin which allows them to watch and practice the techniques simultaneously.  

City Council Invites Columbia Residents to Speak Up

May 5, 2015
speakupcomo.com

  SpeakUpcomo.com is Columbia's new website for public engagement. The city council hopes to use this site in addition to their weekly meetings to reach a wider audience.

“We have put a project on SpeakUpCoMo, and it’s a list of all the various projects being considered right now,” Tony St. Ramaine, the Deputy City Manager of Columbia said. “And we have a description of the project, and people have an opportunity to vote those up if they think they’re needed.”

St. Romaine also said that citizens can suggest their own projects on the website

via Wikimedia user Veggies

There's quiet in the streets of Baltimore again, but the media is still talking about the death of Freddie Gray and the protests that erupted in the aftermath.

David Zurawik, Baltimore Sun: “FOP besmirches media, but WBAL has clear conflict of interest with prosecutor’s office

The images from Baltimore of demonstrations, police in riot gear, looting and outbreaks of violence are familiar to some other cities after encounters with police ended in death for unarmed individuals — primarily black men.

Officials say what comes from those tragic encounters can be important lessons about policing and moving forward.

670 The Score

  Two Chicago sports radio personalities on 670 The Score caught some flak after a Twitter exchange of sexist comments went viral. A few weeks later, the station announced it hired Julie DiCaro to contribute sports blogs for the WSCR-AM and CBSChicago.com website. 

The Score acknowledged its need for female representation. 

Updated 5 p.m., Wed., May 6 -- Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon had harsh words for the General Assembly’s action to override his veto of a bill that shortens the period for low-income families to receive welfare benefits. The bill also imposes new work requirements.

During a stop in St. Louis, the governor said he didn't object to changing the work requirements. But he did object to the way it was done, which his administration says will result in about 6,500 children getting knocked off the state's welfare rolls.

"You don't move the state forward by taking benefits away from 6,500 kids,'' Nixon said. He explained that there were ways, such as a "protected payee program" that would have penalized the parents, but not the children.

"What did a 5-year-old do wrong?" he asked. "There were a lot of ways where kids didn't have to suffer here."

Travon Addison is an athletic 25-year-old, with short cropped hair, a wispy beard and tattoos all over his arms. I first spot him with a pack of his buddies in the lobby of Baltimore's New Shiloh Baptist Church. Community leaders are trying to calm them down.

Addison had been arrested in the riot Monday, released two days later, and he's come to the church because he's heard they're holding a summit on the problems that sparked the violence. He's got a lot to say.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, a Democratic candidate for president, has agreed to testify before a House panel about the deadly attacks on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, and about her email-retention practices.

missouri capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

A plan to use bonds for repairs to the Missouri Capitol, universities and other state-owned buildings is moving forward.

A House committee this week outlined how to spend more than $300 million in bonds for building maintenance and new construction.

The presidential hopefuls haven't spent much time so far with voters. Instead, they've committed many days to courting the millionaires and billionaires who can fuel a White House bid. And at the same time, activists on the left and right are seeking to redefine political corruption, which they believe this is.

This post was updated at 8:10 a.m. E.T. Monday

Updated at 2:10 p.m. ET

Hundreds in Baltimore began a "victory rally" to celebrate a decision by the city's top prosecutor to charge six officers in connection with the death of Freddie Gray, the young black man who died from a spinal injury he sustained in police custody.

The rally began at 2 p.m. in the West Baltimore neighborhood where Gray lived and was making its way to City Hall.

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