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Following a firestorm of criticism, Republican governors in Indiana and Arkansas signed revised versions of their states' Religious Freedom Restoration bills Thursday night. In Indiana the language was adjusted, and in Arkansas it was significantly scaled back to more closely align with the federal law.

Bob McCulloch Spoke on MU's Campus, But to a Select Group

Apr 2, 2015
KARA TABOR / KBIA

St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch spoke at the Missouri School of Law on Tuesday about the grand jury process. McCulloch was the lead prosecutor to handle the jury during the Ferguson case that decided not to indict former officer Darren Wilson who shot and killed Michael Brown last August. 

The event was not heavily promoted. Instead, it was only open to students, faculty and staff of the MU Law School who had to register for the event. The student chapter of the Missouri Association of Prosecuting Attorneys organized McCulloch's appearance, and said due to full capacity of Hulston Hall the public was not allowed in, including the media. 

Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News."

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.  

 


Rep. Chuck Basye never thought he would have the title of Missouri state representative next to his name.

“The closest I [ever] got was I considered running for school board years ago, but the job that I had just didn’t allow that,” Basye said. “This was just all a timing situation. I was looking for something else to do.”

Justin Eagan / Wikimedia Commons

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence (R) signed the state's Religious Freedom Restoration Act into law Thursday, March 26. The law is said to allow businesses to refuse service citing religious reasons. The fear? Those in opposition to the law say this is legislated discrimination, and that it specifically targets the LGBTQ community. ABC'S George Stephanopoulos directly asked Pence if this law is discriminatory, and Pence dodged the question about seven times. 

Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the issue on KBIA-FM's weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News."

For more, follow Views of the News on  Facebook ,  Twitter, and  YouTube.  


    

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence said his state’s new “religious freedom” law could use some clarification, but blames the media for what he considers a misunderstanding of it. Is it misunderstood or is it legalized discrimination, and how did news coverage drive perceptions? Meanwhile, several cities, states, and corporations have issued travel bans and called for boycotts. Also, the media lockout at a law school event featuring St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Robert McCulloch, how newsroom diversity affects workplace culture, the Colorado Springs Gazette’s editorial project, Clearing the Haze. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

File Photo / KBIA

A bill aimed at bolstering Missouri's agricultural industry is headed to the governor.

Missouri senators on Tuesday voted unanimously in favor of the measure, which previously was approved 101-48 by the House.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence said his state’s new “religious freedom” law could use some clarification, but blames the media for what he considers a misunderstanding of it. Is it misunderstood or is it legalized discrimination, and how did news coverage drive perceptions? Meanwhile, several cities, states, and corporations have issued travel bans and called for boycotts.

j. stephenconn / Flickr

  Despite concerns from Republican lawmakers about Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon's withholding money from programs this year, most of his 2015 supplemental budget request is moving forward.

A Missouri House panel on Tuesday approved additional spending for 2015, including $120 million in general funds.

Republican lawmakers have previously criticized the request while the governor's office continues to withhold about $451 million from other priorities this year.

Spence Jackson / Linkedin

  The note left by the Missouri auditor's spokesman before his apparent suicide said "I just can't take being unemployed again."

Jefferson City Police Capt. Doug Shoemaker said Tuesday that the note from Spence Jackson was dated March 27.

Shoemaker also said Jackson died from a single gunshot wound to the head. Jackson was found dead Sunday in his Jefferson City apartment.

A controversial law in Indiana has made its way into the 2016 presidential race. Supporters praise the Religious Freedom Restoration Act's for protecting religious convictions, but the law has drawn wide criticism from those who say it allows businesses to discriminate against gay and lesbian patrons.

The ADA Legacy Tour Visits Mid-MO

Mar 31, 2015
KBIA

The American Disability Act Legacy Tour stopped in Columbia on Monday. The bus stopped at Activity and Recreation Center at University of Missouri at 9 a.m. before it moved to the Speaker’s Circle at 12:30 p.m.

The words "under God" in the Pledge of Allegiance and the phrase "In God we trust" on the back of a dollar bill haven't been there as long as most Americans might think. Those references were inserted in the 1950s during the Eisenhower administration, the same decade that the National Prayer Breakfast was launched, according to writer Kevin Kruse. His new book is One Nation Under God.

In the original Pledge of Allegiance, Francis Bellamy made no mention of God, Kruse says. Bellamy was Christian socialist, a Baptist who believed in the separation of church and state.

This is Part One in an occasional series of features on campaign finance, called "Money Rules."

The hunt for big bucks is changing the way politicians run for president.

When a candidate finally admits he or she is a candidate, donors are limited to gifts of $2,700. (A donor can give an additional $2,700 if the candidate makes it through to the general election.)

Tom Schweich’s Media Director Spence Jackson Found Dead

Mar 30, 2015
Spence Jackson / Linkedin

Missouri state official Spence Jackson, who was the media director for Tom Schweich, was found dead Sunday from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound according to the Jefferson City Police Department. He was 44.

Jackson’s apparent suicide comes about one month after Missouri State Auditor Schweich’s suicide last month.

Jackson had become very outspoken about Schweich’s suicide. He called for the resignation of Republican state Chairman John Hancock, because of Schweich’s allegation that Hancock had conducted an anti-Semitic “whispering campaign” against Schweich.

Updated at 11:30 a.m. ET

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence — facing a major backlash from a new law that would allow businesses in the state to cite religious objections to refuse to serve gay people — says he supports an effort to "clarify the intent" of the legislation while acknowledging surprise over the hostility it has sparked.

While in Europe, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon’s trade entourage has held a lot of meetings, but so far has yet to strike any deals.

That was the message in the governor’s progress report, delivered via a telephone call Wednesday from Munich in Germany.

About four months before the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, police less than 15 miles down I-70 in St. Charles shot another man named Brown. The event barely drew any attention from anyone except immediate family and friends.

Since Michael Brown was shot and killed last year, people within the St. Louis region have been immersed in social and public policy introspection.

An audit of federal funds says Missouri's Medicaid program failed to recover as much as $27 million in medical expenses from deceased participants in the program. 

Joe Gratz / Flickr

Only three Missouri municipalities remain defendants in a lawsuit filed by the attorney general over a law capping the percentage of revenue from traffic fines. 

An audit released Tuesday finds that Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster's office has not instituted a policy to guard against conflicts of interest. In response, Koster noted that his campaign organization had instituted changes following earlier news reports about possible conflicts.

Why did the Justice Department conclude that Michael Brown didn’t cry out “Don’t shoot” and that, if he had his hands up, it was only for a moment before he began moving back toward Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson?

Soldiers scale walls and crawl through cold, damp grass while taking on simulated gunfire in this Basic Training course at Fort Leonard Wood. They’re among the roughly 90,000 yearly trainees at the base, located in the central Missouri Ozarks.

missouri capitol
Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

  Two bills sponsored by Republican lawmakers address privacy concerns in an attempt to pass a long-unsuccessful proposal for a prescription drug database. 

Claire Banderas / KBIA

The Boone County Muleskinners hosted a forum Friday for the three Columbia Board of Education Candidates. Christine King, the current president of the school board and Darin Preis, another incumbent were both present. However, the third candidate, Derek Wade was not present.

At first glance, state Sen. Bob Dixon wouldn’t be an obvious choice to spearhead legislation responding to the unrest in and around Ferguson.

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz has apparently had enough of the fig leaf most presidential candidates wear as their unofficial spring costume the year before the election actually happens.

That is a bold stroke, but entirely in keeping with the go-for-broke style the junior senator from Texas has exhibited since first challenging the Republican establishment's candidate for the Senate in 2012.

Missouri Senate Passes $200 Million Bond Repurpose

Mar 20, 2015
Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

200 million dollars in bonds originally meant for the construction of a new mental health facility will now be used for state building repairs.

The appeals court judge now hearing municipal cases in Ferguson has limited the amount of fines and fees the city can collect from defendants facing traffic, animal control or housing ordinance violations.

missouri auditor tom schweich
State of Missouri

A Republican donor and operative have different recollections about whether the Missouri GOP chairman made negative religious remarks about a state auditor who killed himself. 

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