Politics

Political news

  A Missouri lawmaker is continuing to push for a prescription medication database despite several previous failed attempts.

  Missouri lawmakers say they're reviving a failed agricultural bill that could help dairy, cattle and crop farmers. 

Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

  Boone County commissioners want the ability to impose standards on rental properties outside the Columbia city limits. 

Leadership battle in Missouri Republican party

Nov 21, 2014
Donkey Hotey / flickr

A battle is brewing over the leadership of the Missouri Republican Party as it looks toward a 2016 election in which nearly all of the state's offices will be on the ballot.

A spokesman for the St. Louis County prosecutor says a grand jury is still meeting to consider charges against a Ferguson police officer in the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown.

chris koster
File photo / KBIA

After a New York Time’s article published in late October revealed Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster accepted thousands of dollars in campaign contributions from lawyers of companies his office investigated, he announced he’ll be implementing “new transparency measures intended to address perceptions regarding political contributions.”

Jack Howard / KBIA

We've all been there. Driving downtown during a high traffic time. Maybe on 9th Street. Listening to KBIA. 

And then--stopped. There's a semi truck stopped in the lane up ahead. 

House Republicans on Friday followed through on a threat to sue President Obama over actions he has taken concerning the Affordable Care Act.

The lawsuit was filed in a federal court against the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Treasury.

Did host Scott Simon unfairly—and sordidly—ambush Bill Cosby by raising rape charges in a Weekend Edition interview that was otherwise about art?

The 77-year old comedian and wife Camille—she was present—were being interviewed on air Saturday about the many pieces of art that they are lending to the Smithsonian Museum when Simon, at the end, changed the subject:

Ryan Famuliner / KBIA

A Missouri lawmaker is vowing to block recommended pay increases for elected officials.

Rep. Mark Parkinson announced Thursday that he'll file a resolution against proposed salary increases next session.

A panel this week suggested 8 percent pay raises in fiscal year 2016 and again in 2017 for the governor and other statewide officials.

State lawmakers also would receive a $4,000 raise over two years.

But Parkinson, a St. Charles Republican, says the money could be better spent as the state's economy continues to recover.

State of Missouri

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich (shwyk) confirms he is considering a run for governor and will announce a decision early next year.

Schweich told The Associated Press on Thursday that he believes he has the qualifications, commitment and financial support to run but wants to ensure it is something he and his family want to do.

Schweich's comments came as his supporters released a letter signed by more than 120 people encouraging him to run.

After six years of often bitter back-and-forth with congressional Republicans over the issue of immigration, President Obama announced he has decided to go it alone by temporarily shielding up to 5 million immigrants from being deported.

So What Is An 'Executive Action' Anyway?

Nov 20, 2014

You can read here about President Obama's executive action on immigration. Or here, a story about his executive order.

Although commonly conflated in the media, the two terms aren't exactly interchangeable.

In short ...

This post was updated on Dec. 1, 2014, at 4:52 p.m.

President Obama is set to announce executive action tonight, granting temporary relief to some of the nearly 12 million immigrants who are living in the United States illegally. Here's what we know so far:

1. What kind of relief is the president offering?

Obama's move lifts the threat of deportation — at least temporarily. But it does not provide the full path to citizenship as envisioned under a comprehensive immigration bill.

Update at 7:35 p.m. ET: The Senate voted against completing the Keystone pipeline.

The remaining portion of the Keystone pipeline project, if completed, will be fewer than 1,200 miles long — just a fraction of the existing 2.6 million miles of oil and gas pipelines running beneath our feet in the United States.

Talking Politics: Nixon's Ferguson Trouble

Nov 19, 2014

In a phone interview Monday, Governor Jay Nixon stumbled when asked if the buck stops with him on the Ferguson response.  Eli Yokley joins us to discuss the politics surrounding Nixon's response.  

NPR’s Scott Simon asked Bill Cosby some pointed questions about allegations waged against him, but were the questions about sexual assault allegations or something else?  An Uber executive unhappy about media coverage looks to dig up dirt on unfriendly journalists, the Orange County Register looks to reporters to take on paper delivery routes and why an Australian television anchor’s decision to wear the same suit every day for a year is earning him high praise from feminists. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

The old joke used to be: Who is buried in Grant's tomb?

Now it's not so funny anymore.

Marijuana legalization advocates speak at MU

Nov 19, 2014
marijuana
LancerenoK / Flickr

Two advocates of marijuana legalization spoke at MU to encourage community members to support the reform. Ira Glasser and Neill Franklin spoke last Thursday and both pushed for expansion of legalizing marijuana, but for different reasons.

Glasser, the president of Drug Policy Alliance, said that legalizing marijuana on a national scale would eliminate many drug-related arrests.

“Over the last 10-15 years, more people have been arrested for possessing small amounts of marijuana in New York City than in any other place in the world,” he said.

NPR's Scott Simon had the first interview with actor-comedian Bill Cosby following the recent allegations of sexual assault against him.  Simon asked Cosby on Saturday Weekend Edition if he wanted to address those allegations.  

In a relatively short meeting last night, three of  seven non-consent agenda  items considered by the Columbia City Council pertained to sidewalks, bringing to light the sometimes conflicting views that could lead the city to reevaluate its sidewalk regulations.


Columbia's rules regarding group homes reviewed

Nov 18, 2014
File / KBIA

Columbia's Community Development Department is reviewing rules regarding group homes. This review came after an agency serving mentally and physically handicapped people proposed to open a new group home next to an existing one.

File / KBIA

The Columbia Housing Authority is in the process of trying to secure a 9% Low-Income Housing Tax Credit and the Columbia City Council will be backing them up. This tax credit will go towards renovating its 719 public housing units.

Barnaby Wasson / Flickr

  A report shows Missouri had the largest enrollment decline for a federal program that helps working parents pay for child care.

Updated at 4:45 p.m. ET

The White House has confirmed that a video released by the self-declared Islamic State that shows the beheading of hostage Peter Kassig, an American aid worker in Syria who was kidnapped in 2013, is authentic.

The radical jihadist group posted the video on social media early Sunday.

President Obama said in a statement that he offered his condolences to the family, describing the beheading as "an act of pure evil."

Youth cleaning graffiti
File Photo / KBIA

A recent spur in graffiti incidents throughout downtown Columbia has groups throughout the city working together to find a solution.

Hallsville repeals 20-year-old pit-bull ban

Nov 14, 2014

A 20-year-old pit-bull ban has been repealed by The Hallsville City Council. Cheri Reish, mayor of Hallsville, said there is a resident in the area who adopted a pit-bull and were originally told that pit-bull was not allowed in the community.

Columbia residents, consultants discuss city's future

Nov 14, 2014
Sofie Rasmussen / KBIA

Columbia residents had a chance to weigh in on another round of recommendations for what development  in downtown Columbia should look like at a public forum at City Hall Thursday night.

Consultants, hired by the city, discussed the second of three models concerning development in the city. It included suggestions to limit building heights, make the city more walkable and change parking areas.

#Pointergate

Nov 13, 2014

KSTP-TV accused the Minneapolis Mayor of throwing up gang signs after she was photographed with a black constituent. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Fink, Jamie Grey and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

    

Chris Koster
Missouri Attorney General's Office

A panel of state lawmakers has been formed to look into allegations involving lobbyist perks and campaign contributions going to Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster.

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