press freedom

Travis McMillen/RJI

    

Journalists in Turkey and South Africa both work in countries with lively and well-established media. But in both countries, long-running single-party rule has led to challenges for reporters.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, guest host Joshua Kranzberg talks about these issues and more with journalists from the two countries visiting the U.S. on fellowships from the Alfred Friendly Press Partners.  

Travis McMillen / RJI

At first glance, media in Pakistan and the Ukraine have little in common.

But in both the South Asian nation and the former Soviet republic, independent private news outlets are relatively new and face a host of challenges both from government restrictions and outside actors. They're also among the most dangerous countries in the world for journalists.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, we interview journalists from prominent media outlets in each country who are visiting the U.S. on fellowships from the University of Missouri-based Alfred Friendly Press Partners.


AP

It’s said that truth is often the first casualty in war. And for media in the Palestinian territories–where conflict has been the norm for more than six decades– giving the public an accurate picture of the news is a huge challenge.

In Gaza, where Hamas rules, Palestinian journalists must toe the line or face consequences. In the West Bank, governed by the Fatah-dominated Palestinian Authority, reporters can face criminal charges for covering corruption or criticizing officials.

Meanwhile Israeli forces have become increasingly aggressive towards Palestinian journalists, sometimes placing them in indefinite "administrative detention" without trial.


AP

 

For much of its population, Somalia is a difficult and dangerous place to live.

It’s particularly true for reporters. Practicing journalism in a failed state means facing threats from any number of militia groups.

That includes Islamist radicals from al-Shabaab as well as from armed groups loyal to Somalia’s internationally-backed government in Mogadishu. At least 59 Somali journalists have been killed since 1992-the year after the fall of dictator Siad Barre threw the country into chaos.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the state of journalism in Somalia.


(Travis McMillen)

In a special edition of Global Journalist, al-Jazeera's Director General Mostefa Souag addresses controversies that have shadowed the award-winning, Qatar-based news network as it tries to grow its U.S. presence.

During an extended interview, Souag responds to questions about the network's independence from the Qatari government, perceptions of anti-Semitic and anti-American bias and its famous interviews with Osama bin Laden.


AP

  Turkish voters will go to the polls Nov. 1 amid a spasm of political violence and renewed conflict with Kurdish guerrillas. The vote also comes just weeks after the most deadly terrorist attack in Turkish history and as the army is struggling to keep the civil war in Syria from spilling over into Turkey.

Despite a government crackdown on independent media President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's ruling AKP party may struggle to win a parliamentary majority. On this week's edition of Global Journalist, we discuss Turkey's election and whether the country, once a democratic model in the Middle East, is sliding towards authoritarianism.

AP

Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian has been imprisoned in Iran since July 2014. On this edition of Global Journalist, we examine how Iran's internal politics and relations with the U.S. have led to the lengthy jailing of a correspondent for a major U.S. newspaper. 

Fernando Llano / AP

Venezuela is a country that should, by all accounts, be doing quite well. It’s one of the top oil-producing countries in the world.

But the South American nation also has one of the highest murder rates in the world, a government whose officials are accused of selling drugs, and millions living below the poverty line. Not only that, the country's economy is crumbling, and the government is notorious for clamping down on journalists who challenge it on these issues.

Bikas Das / AP

Journalists and bloggers in Bangladesh are finding themselves increasingly under fire. Last year, a group that calls itself “Defenders of Islam” published a “hit list” of more than 80 writers.

Then in the first six months of 2015, three of those named were hacked to death in separate knife attacks. The latest was in May, when four masked men attacked blogger Ananta Bijoy Das with machetes while he was heading to work.

Dolores Ochoa / AP

Many people know Ecuador as the home of calm and picturesque sights, from the Galapagos Islands and lush Amazonian rain forest to soaring Andean peaks.

thierry ehrmann / Flickr

  Journalists around the globe are decrying an Egyptian court's decision to imprison three Al Jazeera English journalists on charges of making false news reports and aiding terrorists. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jim Flink, Mike McKean and Amy Simons discuss the issue.

Gemunu Amarasinghe / AP Photo

After nearly 50 years of military rule, the country officially known as Myanmar has slowly emerged from its near-lifetime of isolation and repression. Since 2011, the country has opened up to the international community and instituted a number of political reforms, including the release of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. In 2012 the government ended its policy of media censorship.

Gemunu Amarasinghe / AP Photo

After nearly 50 years of military rule, the country officially known as Myanmar has slowly emerged from its near-lifetime of isolation and repression. Since 2011, the country has opened up to the international community and instituted a number of political reforms, including the release of opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi. In 2012 the government ended its policy of media censorship.

Nation Media Group flourishes in Kenya

Jul 18, 2013
Ben Curtis / Associated Press

Freedom of the press is rising steadily in Kenya. The constitution now specifically prohibits the state from interfering with the editorial independence of journalists and their media outlets, both state-owned and private.

Journalists on the front lines in Honduras

Apr 26, 2013
Fernando Antonio / AP Photo

Honduras has become akin to a war zone, since the 2009 coup that deposed the former president, Manuel Zelaya. The country of around 8 million people, bordered by Guatemala, Nicaragua, the Pacific Ocean, and Caribbean Sea, is among the most dangerous places on earth. 

Burhan Ozbilici / AP Images

Turkey portrays itself as the leading nation in an increasingly turbulent region of the world. The country that straddles Europe and the Middle East is a secular democracy with a thriving economy. It's also a member of NATO and a potential member of the European Union. 

When do security concerns trump free speech? When should whistleblowers be sent to jail, along with the journalists who report on their leaks?

Reporting in Cuba

Feb 2, 2012

Being an independent news reporter in Cuba is a dangerous occupation. The Committee to Protect Journalists points out that Cuba was once tied with China for holding the largest number of journalists behind bars. 

After protests stormed the Middle East this year, many wondered if freedom can flower.