Why Words Matter in Media Coverage

May 12, 2015
via Wikimedia user Veggies

A term used to describe protesters in Baltimore is ruffling some feathers. Some are saying that "thug" is now synonymous with the n-word. Missouri School of journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean discuss the implications of the term on the weekly media criticism program, "Views of the News." 

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Wikimedia Commons / Loavesofbread

Gunshots, fires and looting rocked Ferguson overnight, as protests erupted following the death of a black man in police custody in Baltimore.

Students, faculty and members of the MU community gathered Tuesday for a panel discussion about the university’s role in working to end apartheid in South Africa. In the 1980s, students successfully pushed the MU board of curators to divest from American companies doing business in South Africa.

Kathryn Benson, who was heavily involved in the 1980s movement, said protestors built and occupied shantytowns on Francis Quadrangle after traditional protests failed. Benson said students took turns occupying the shanties from October 1986 through February of 1987.

(Updated 4:12 p.m. with comments from attorneys.)

The three agencies that made up the "unified command" during protests in Ferguson over the summer will have to provide warning before using tear gas or other chemical agents to disperse peaceful crowds.


FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) — Demonstrators have disrupted business at a large suburban St. Louis shopping mall to protest a grand jury's decision not to indict the police officer who fatally shot Michael Brown in nearby Ferguson.

At least 200 protesters gathered on one of the busiest shopping days of the year Friday at the Galleria mall in Richmond Heights, about 10 miles south of Ferguson.

Authorities have arrested at least two people at a protest over the Ferguson grand jury decision in which several demonstrators stormed City Hall in St. Louis.

Protesters and law enforcement officersmay have hoped for calm. But reaction to news of the grand jury’s decision to not indict Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson in the August shooting death of Michael Brown ended in arson, looting and tear gas.

MU Archives

Peace Park is that grassy little knoll along the north edge of MU’s campus. It’s at the corner of 8th and Elm, a stone’s throw away from the columns. There’s a creek (or drainage ditch) that saunters through it, creating a calm and tranquil vibe for the meditators and hammock dwellers.    


The sound of honking horns became a symbol Thursday night along West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson.

It was the first night since Saturday -- the day Michael Brown was shot to death by a Ferguson police officer -- that traffic had been allowed to move freely along one of the main commercial strips in Ferguson. There was no line of police in riot gear and armored vehicles facing off against a crowd. The few officers spotted were in regular uniforms. The atmosphere felt more like a party than a protest.

(Updated at 4:20 p.m., Thurs., Aug. 14)

As of Thursday, the Missouri Highway Patrol is now in charge in Ferguson. And Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon, who announced the change, said at a news conference that the public should see a difference at once.

The St. Louis County police have been widely criticized for their aggressive, even militaristic stance -- using armored vehicles and tear gas -- to quell protests stemming from last Saturday's police shooting. 

St. Louis Board of Alderman President Lewis Reed has an idea about what’s driving the frustration about Michael Brown’s death. 

As federal and local investigations into Brown’s shooting death unfold, Reed said more and more people want details and quick action. They want to know what really happened when a Ferguson police officer shot the 18-year-old last Saturday.

Efrem Lukatsky / Associated Press

For over two months, demonstrators have gathered in Kiev’s central Independence Square to voice their frustration with the government. What began as a peaceful rally in support of Ukrainian integration into the EU intensified following a brutal police crackdown. 

Are protests in Sudan a prelude to an 'African Spring' uprising?

Nov 7, 2013
Khalil Hamra / Associated Press

On Sept. 23, thousands of Sudanese protesters took to the streets of the capital Khartoum. The country’s autocratic leaders lifted fuel subsidies to raise revenue, leaving outraged citizens to deal with sky rocketing fuel prices. In response to the violent riots, the government imposed a 24-hour Internet blackout to strip citizens of social media communication and block the media coverage.

Rehman Tungekar

Items belonging to Occupy COMO protesters were removed from city hall on Tuesday. City workers and police came at about 11 am to remove a tent, sleeping bags and other personal belongings that were stored in front of the building.

David Shankbone/Flickr

The Occupy Wall Street demonstrations have captured the world’s attention. Related demonstrations, meanwhile, have spread across the U.S. and around the world.