Courtesy photo

You see them on the battlefields patrolling the front lines and risking their lives.

But they are not soldiers, at least not in the traditional sense. They’re war correspondents. These brave men and women travel to the most dangerous parts of the globe, all for the story.

For many journalists, covering one war is enough. But there’s a small group of reporters and photographers who have made it their career to jump from one war to another.

Jack Howard / KBIA

The Veterans Health Administration has reported it found PTSD in almost one in three soldiers since 2001. Examining the disorder in veterans and how it is treated was the subject of 'Of Men and War,' a film shown at this year's True/False Film Festival. 

Lt. David Wells, a Columbia native, is one of the soldiers profiled in the film. He spoke with KBIA's Jack Howard about how an innovate treatment center in California helped him and how others with PTSD can find help. 



After 12 years of service in the U.S. Navy and military, Kendale Carter received a medical discharge for his PTSD symptoms. When he arrived home, he struggled with his condition while also coping with the death of his younger brother, who died of a brain tumor, and the separation from his first wife. Carter came to StoryCorps with long-time family friend Jenny Greeves  to talk about his struggles and what it took for him to persevere.

The story was produced by Andrew Yost for KBIA. Music by Chris Zabriskie.