race

In recent years, social scientists have tried to find out whether important decisions are shaped by subtle biases. They've studied recruiters as they decide whom to hire. They've studied teachers, deciding which students to help at school. And they've studied doctors, figuring out what treatments to give patients. Now, researchers have trained their attention on a new group of influential people — state legislators.

In the days of protests that have followed the shooting of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, one fact has been repeated over and over again: Of the 50 or so police officers on the Ferguson Police Department, just three are African-American.

That means a majority white police force patrols a community that, according to the 2012 census estimates, is two-thirds black. 

The police chief of Ferguson, Mo., says his department has made race relations a "top priority," after a shooting of an unarmed black teen sparked days of protests.

Another man (this time armed) was reportedly shot by a St. Louis County police officer early Wednesday after police responded to reports of shots being fired.

Travis Boechler / Flickr

Black motorists were more likely to be pulled over by police in Missouri last year, according to an annual report released by Attorney General Chris Koster.

MU doesn't factor in race during admissions process

Sep 10, 2012
COCOEN / FLICKR

Next month the Supreme Court will take up the matter of race in college admissions. But Chuck May from the MU Admissions Office says the case will have no effect on MU since race is not a factor in undergraduate admissions.

"If a student meets our admission requirements that are published, which all students and parents can see, then they are automatically admissible," May says. "We have no cap on admissions, so there is no student   that would take the place of another student that is eligible for admission.”