real id

Katherine Johnson / flickr

  Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens has signed a bill aimed at averting a scenario in which Missouri residents could have been turned away at airports for lack of valid identification.

The legislation signed Monday will give residents the option to get driver's licenses or other identification cards that comply with the federal Real ID Act.

Compliance with the tougher proof-of-identity requirements is necessary at airports, some federal facilities and military bases. The federal government has said Missouri licenses won't be valid at airports in 2018 if they're not compliant.

Senate floor at the Missouri Capitol
File / KBIA

Missouri senators have voted to give residents a choice to get a driver's license that would allow them to board planes and enter military sites.

Senators voted 28-5 Wednesday to allow residents to decide whether to get a license that complies with federal ID requirements.

Without a change, Missouri residents won't be able to use their driver's licenses to board airplanes or enter some federal facilities starting in 2018.

Missouri appears to be one of the handful of states that haven't fully enacted key provisions of the 2005 Real ID Act.

FHKE via Flickr

Some Missouri lawmakers say they are so concerned with federal driver's license requirements that they've been willing to defy federal standards and risk hassles for residents trying to fly or enter military installations.

Josh Hallett / flickr

Missouri residents are one step closer to being able to get a driver's license that complies with a federal identification requirement.

The Missouri House on Thursday passed a bill with a 99-40 vote that would allow people to decide whether to get a compliant license.

Without a change, Missouri residents won't be able to use their driver's licenses to board airplanes starting in 2018. They already can't use them to enter military bases. The bill now moves to the Senate.

On a day that looked like it might be a busy one for the Missouri Senate, lawmakers adjourned Thursday without taking a final vote on banning cities and counties from raising their minimum wage because of negotiations.

Meanwhile, the Missouri House sent the Senate three bills, showing their intent to get rid of prevailing wage, protect anti-abortion groups that assist pregnant women and allow for Real ID driver’s licenses.

REAL ID Sits in Missouri Senate

Feb 28, 2017
Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

In 2018, Missourians may have a harder time boarding flights and entering federal buildings using their driver’s license.

Missouri is one of five states that does not comply with REAL ID, the 2005 federal law that requires states to administer stricter standards for distributing state identification like driver’s licenses.


Updated at 4:28 p.m. Jan. 8 with announcement from Homeland Security- The regulatory clock is now ticking loudly for state lawmakers in Jefferson City, Mo., and Springfield, Ill., to ensure that residents of both states can use their state-issued driver's licenses and identification cards as proper forms of identification to board commercial airliners.

drivers license
Missouri Department of Revenue

Missouri residents soon will no longer be able to use their state driver's licenses as identification to get into most federal facilities. 

File / KBIA

A new report says Gov. Jay Nixon's administration displayed an "indifference to the privacy rights" of Missourians through its driver's license policies.

Seal of the State Auditor
File Photo / KBIA

Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich has concluded that officials violated state law by requiring driver's license clerks to make electronic copies of applicants' personal documents.

Schweich released an analysis Monday concluding the Department of Revenue broke state law by implementing the policy last December without publishing a formal rule change.

That policy ended in July as a result of a bill passed by the Legislature and signed by the governor. But Schweich had been asked in April by senators to look into the policy.

Missouri Capitol
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

A former director of the Missouri department that issues driver's licenses says the agency did not take steps to comply with the federal Real ID Act after passage of a state law prohibiting it.

Alana Barragan-Scott led the Revenue Department from July 2009 until late December 2012. She testified Wednesday before two legislative panels investigating the handling of driver's licenses by Governor Jay Nixon's administration.

Republican lawmakers are raising new questions about whether Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon's administration has tried to comply with the federal Real ID Act.

Senators on Wednesday released a copy of a form letter sent in March 2010 by Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano to Nixon thanking him for his efforts to comply with Real ID.

Nixon signed a 2009 state law prohibiting Missouri from taking steps intended to comply with the goals of the 2005 federal identity law, which sets stringent requirements for photo identification cards.