red light camera

File Photo / KBIA

The city of Columbia is moving back toward using red-light cameras. 

Previously, the city had used cameras from 2009 to 2013, but stopped because of unclear court rulings surrounding their use.

Last month, the Missouri Supreme Court ruled the use of red-light cameras was constitutional, which prompted the city to look back into installing cameras at various intersections.

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The city of St. Louis says it will refund roughly $5.6 million to motorists who paid red-light camera tickets over the past year and a half.

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  The Missouri House approved a bill that will allow citizens to vote on the use of red light cameras.

The House met Wednesday, April 30 to approve a House Bill 207, sponsored by State Rep. Paul Curtman.

Curtman said he believes the use of red light cameras should banned in Missouri. He said there are municipalities in Missouri that have tried to redefine movement caught by a red light camera as a non-moving violation, a way for the municipalities to continue to collect fines without assigning points to licensed drivers.


Voters would get to decide whether any governments in Missouri should be able to use red light cameras under a measure moving forward in the Missouri House.

The House on Wednesday gave initial approval to a bill that would a question on the 2016 ballot banning automated traffic enforcement.

The Missouri Supreme Court is mulling over three cases that could decide whether cities and towns can continue to use traffic cameras to catch speeders and red-light runners.

Two of the cases involve the use of red-light cameras, one in St. Louis and the other in St. Peters. The third case involves the use of speeding cameras in Moline Acres in St. Charles County.

Attorney Bevis Schock represents plaintiffs in the St. Louis and St. Peters cases. He told the high court Tuesday that their use creates a situation where the motorist is guilty until proven innocent.

The battleground over the use of red light and speed cameras in Missouri shifted this week from the courtroom to the state Capitol.

Horia Varlan / Flickr

Missouri drivers would not have points assessed against their license for tickets issued by automated traffic cameras under legislation endorsed by the state House.

The House gave initial approval to the bill Wednesday that would regulate red-light and speeding cameras.

Photo traffic enforcement systems for Missouri municipalities have been the subject of ongoing court cases and many cities have temporary halted enforcement. The measure would require cities to meet certain standards in order to operate speeding or red-light cameras.

File Photo / KBIA

For the third time in slightly more than a month, a Missouri appeals court ruling raises concerns about red-light cameras.

The Missouri Court of Appeals' Eastern District on Tuesday reversed a lower court ruling that favored the red-light camera law in the city of Arnold.

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The City Council in Kansas City is considering changes to the city's red-light camera law that will try to address concerns raised in a recent Missouri Court of Appeals ruling.

The City Council's Public Safety Committee endorsed the changes Monday. The Kansas City Star reports that if the council approves the proposed changes, the new law would take effect 10 days after that and red-light camera enforcement could resume.

File Photo / KBIA

The future of red-light cameras in Missouri communities could be in jeopardy after a state appeals court panel ruled that most municipal ordinances governing the cameras are not enforceable.