rep. scott fitzpatrick

A measure to repeal tax breaks for low-income Missouri seniors and disabled residents who live in rental housing is advancing in the Legislature.

House members voted 89-65 to give the bill initial approval Wednesday. At least 82 lawmakers must vote in favor of it again for it to advance to the Senate.

The measure would set aside additional revenue from the roughly $55 million-a-year tax break for other services for low-income seniors and those with disabilities.

Missouri Capitol
j.stephenconn / Flickr

Missouri's House budget leader says lawmakers might not have changed corporate tax law if they'd known what it would actually cost.

Republican House Budget Committee Chairman Scott Fitzpatrick told The Associated Press that lawmakers had poor information when the 2015 bill came up for a vote.

The measure was estimated to cost about $15 million annually. Corporate tax revenues dropped more than $155 million the first fiscal year it was implemented, though it's not clear whether that was all from the tax change.

Missouri's House budget leader says lawmakers might not have changed corporate tax law if they'd known what it would actually cost.

Republican House Budget Committee Chairman Scott Fitzpatrick told The Associated Press that lawmakers had poor information when the 2015 bill came up for a vote.

The measure was estimated to cost about $15 million annually. Corporate tax revenues dropped more than $155 million the first fiscal year it was implemented, though it's not clear whether that was all from the tax change.

David Shane / Flickr

Missouri's unemployed would again face losing several weeks of jobless benefits under a bill advancing in the state House.

House members in a Wednesday voice vote gave the measure initial approval.

Rep. Scott Fitzpatrick's bill is a revival of a failed 2015 plan to cut the maximum benefits to 13 weeks if the state's jobless rate is below 6 percent. That's seven weeks fewer than what's now allowed.

Missouri's unemployment rate in December was 4.4 percent. More current data are not available.