2jaysjoju / Flickr

Research shows that the Earth’s warming climate can have a massive impact on many parts of the ecosystem, from the ocean down to the tiny bee. Recently, bees have been dying in increasing numbers due to environmental changes.

Some sub-species, however, seem to be putting up a better fight than others.

Hope Kirwan / KBIA

Each month at the Columbia Science Cafe, a researcher from the University of Missouri gives a presentation at Broadway Brewery as people enjoy a beer or a bite to eat.

While the world of research labs seems far removed from the dinner table, one associate professor at MU is bringing the two together.

Dr. Chris Pires is a botanist at MU. But when he describes his research, he often sounds more like a genealogist.

The New York Times has had to walk back its story on a "criminal" probe of Hillary Clinton's private email server while the paper is vigorously defending another of its exclusives...on abuses in the nail salon industry.  The first Republican presidential debate is only a week away.  Some wonder whether all the scrambling to meet the Fox News criteria for inclusion is worth the trouble.  More bad news for the newspaper business: major layoffs and poor performance with minority employment.  Media companies are embracing a new revenue source that raises ethical questions.  And research shows "visual" news sites are more successful.

Tony Fischer / Flickr

  Research conducted at the University of Missouri indicates that more people are talking in advance about end-of-life wishes with their aged loved ones.

Tasting the future of elderberry juice

Oct 20, 2014
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  MU researchers should start preparing their taste buds for a new study comparing different kinds of elderberry juices. The researchers received a grant from the US Department of Agriculture to examine the different juices and find “off” flavors in certain varieties of elderberries.

It has been just over three months since the federal spending cuts known as sequestration first took effect.

A handful of programs were spared — but not scientific research, which amounts to about $140 billion in annual government spending.

As St. Louis Public Radio’s Véronique LaCapra found out, at universities here in St. Louis, some scientists are worried about what the budget cuts will mean for their research — and for their students.

"I had to let go of some science."

Laura King

On this week's show, we'll discuss why regret might not always be a bad thing.

File / KBIA

MU Scientists have received a 5.5 million dollars donation from the Sidney Kimmel Foundation. The money will go toward efforts in the search for new forms of alternative energy.