roots n blues

Sarah Kellogg

Since the Roots N Blues N Barbecue festival moved from downtown Columbia to Stephens Lake Park, festivalgoers have been greeted by larger-than-life puppets that light up and moved throughout the park. The puppets were provided by the Astral Gypsies, but this year, they weren’t coming to the festival.

So the art crew decided it would make its own. Only, there was a small problem.

Riley Beggin

While music may be the draw for some of the attendees of the Roots N Blues N BBQ festival, it’s not the only thing attendees may look forward to. A lot of Roots-n-Blues music lovers are also food lovers.

While barbecue might have played the title role, patrons could also enjoy ribbon chips, homemade pies, fried catfish and many other options.

Accessibility Staff Makes Sure All Can Enjoy Roots N Blues

Oct 7, 2016
Carter Woodiel

For Chuck Graham, a former state senator who uses a wheelchair, attending live music festivals was often more of a hassle than enjoyable.

“I didn’t even enjoy the music because I was so irritated with just the struggle of being able to get there,” he said.

Graham, the accessibility director for the Roots n’ Blues n’ Barbecue Festival, which took place from Sept. 30 to Oct. 2, was determined not to let that happen at Roots n’ Blues.

“I just wanted to make it as easy as possible for other people to get here and just really enjoy live music,” he said.

Exam - Students Embrace The Arts Through Blues In The Schools Program

Oct 4, 2016
Garrett Giles / KBIA

Blues in the Schools celebrated its’ 10th anniversary Saturday, Oct. 1, with a performance in the Stephen’s Lake Park Amphitheatre.

The program aims to raise funds to grow awareness of the arts in mid-Missouri. The program’s resident visual artist, Terry Sutton, helped Grant Elementary students from kindergarten to the fifth grade create a mural called “The Blues Tree” at Central Bank of Boone County. It depicts what the last 10 years of the program. The artwork displays early Missouri artists of classical, jazz, and ragtime music like Chuck Berry, Muddy Waters, “Lady Day” Billie Holiday, and T.J. Wheeler, who runs the program.

Sarah Kellogg

Columbia’s annual Roots N Blues N BBQ festival kicks off September 30 at Stephens Lake Park. It is one of the city’s biggest events, where fans can hear a range of live music, try out a variety of barbecued meat and view local artwork all in one location. But one particular kind of artwork has become an interesting staple at Roots N Blues. 

Amanda Sohaney / KOMU

The 7th annual Roots N Blues festival brought more than 22,000 fans from 35 states -- and five other countries -- to Columbia this September.

This year’s event marked the first time the festival took place in Stephens Lake Park, and saw 27 artists from across the world take the stage.

The event gave a boost to Columbia’s economy, as it created $1,205,842 in economic impact for the city, according to the 2013 Convention and Visitors Bureau Economic Impact Study.

Organizer Richard King said he was satisfied with this year’s event.

Kris Husted / KBIA

  The Roots N Blues N BBQ Festival blew up on social media all weekend. We pulled out some of the more interesting posts and put them together in a Storify for you:

Kristofor Husted / KBIA

The 7th annual Roots N Blues N BBQ festival has wrapped up after three days full of events.