Ryan Thomas

The fallout from the New York Times’ reporting on harassment allegations against Hollywood movie mogul Harvey Weinstein have meant big changes for the company he co-founded. Why is it taking decades for those stories to become public? Also, ESPN suspends Jemele Hill after another violation of the network’s social media policy, Dove apologizes for a racially insensitive promotion and Facebook has a plan for fact checking. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.

The fallout from the New York Times’ reporting on harassment allegations against Hollywood movie mogul Harvey Weinstein have meant big changes for the company he co-founded. Why is it taking decades for those stories to become public? 

Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, New York Times: “Harvey Weinstein paid off sexual harassment accusers for decades

Hollywood usually banks on big summer blockbusters… but this year, Americans said no to the going to the movies. Was it this year’s offerings? Or are our entertainment options changing and making the movie theater a thing of the past? Also, why the EPA called an AP report about Houston superfund sites yellow journalism, an ESPN commentator quits rather than call football games, and Tronc’s move to buy the New York Daily News. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Ryan Thomas and Mike McKean: Views of the News.

via Flickr user Sarah_Ackerman

Hollywood usually banks on big summer blockbusters… but this year, Americans said no to the going to the movies. Was it this year’s offerings? Or are our entertainment options changing and making the movie theater a thing of the past? 

Adam B. Vary, BuzzFeed: “Why Hollywood bombed so badly this summer

Hillary Clinton’s health is in the news again. What information does she owe the press – and the American people? Was there ever any doubt that Donald Trump’s interview with Larry King would end up on Vladimir Putin’s RT network? Also, what pressure did Matt Lauer’s performance during a candidate forum put on future debate moderators? Facebook’s about face on censoring an iconic photo from the Vietnam War, the role of the local gossip columnist. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.

marcn/FLICKR

Hillary Clinton’s health is in the news again. What information does she owe the press – and the American people?

Callum Borchers, Washington Post: “Conservative media – and NPR – entertain the possibility of a Hillary Clinton replacement

Missouri School of Journalism students found themselves in the center of the Brussels terror attacks early this morning. We’ll talk about the challenge of reporting during traumatic events. Also, President Barack Obama’s historic trip to Cuba, on-going violence at Donald Trump rallies, and a big win for Hulk Hogan in his privacy suit against Gawker. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.

via On the Media

Missouri School of Journalism students found themselves in the center of the Brussels terror attacks early this morning. We’ll talk about the challenge of reporting during traumatic events.

Jenna Middaugh, KOMU-TV: "16 Students, 1 MU professor safe in Brussels amid terror attacks"

Candlelight
Yves Tennevin

The French publication Charlie Hebdo has a long history of publishing controversial cartoons. But after an attack on its offices that left 10 staff and two police officers dead, news organizations are grappling with the ethics of reprinting those same cartoons. The graphic depictions may provide relevant context, yet are deeply offensive to many of the Muslim faith. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jamie Grey, Ryan Thomas and Amy Simons discuss the publication on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News."


It was a big night for the cast and crew of both Boyhood and the Amazon series Transparent, as each walked away with two Golden Globe awards Sunday. The CW Network received its first Golden Globe for Gina Rodriguez's performance in Jane the Virgin. Yet with only one award given to the major broadcast networks,  ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox were left out in the cold. Missouri School of Journalism professors Jamie Grey, Ryan Thomas and Amy Simons discuss the Golden Globes and the future of television on KBIA-FM's media criticism program, "Views of the News."

It’s been more than a week since the deadly attack on the French satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo. The remaining staff has put out its first edition, again with a cartoon of the Prophet Mohammed on the cover.  Who is republishing the cartoons? Who isn’t? Is it possible to give this story context without using it? From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Jamie Grey and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.


via Flickr user Valentina Cala

It's been a week since the deadly attack on the French satirical newspaper, Charlie Hebdo. The remaining staff has put out is first edition since the January 7, 2015 shooting that left 12 dead.  On its cover: another cartoon showing the image of the Prophet Mohammed.  What message are editors trying to send?