saudi arabia

Almigdad Mojalli / VOA

The civil war in Yemen has garnered many superlatives since it began in force in March 2015. It's generated the world's most dire humanitarian crisis and the largest cholera outbreak in a single year ever recorded – even Forbes ranked its economy as the world's worst

Yet despite a conflict that has left 7 million on the brink of starvation, there is little end in sight to fighting between Iranian-backed Houthi rebels and the country's Saudi-backed government. Attempts to spur a U.N. investigation into war crimes committed by both sides have so far failed. Complicating efforts is support for the Saudi-backed government by the U.S., U.K. and France. 

On this edition of Global Journalist, we discuss Yemen's humanitarian crisis, the collapse of independent media in the country and the role of outsiders in fueling a conflict that has generated startling levels of human suffering. 


Associated Press

On the surface, the tiny Persian Gulf nation of Qatar has much in common with Saudi Arabia and the other monarchies of the Arabian peninsula. Hydro-carbons have made it enormously wealthy, and it’s conservative Muslim nation ruled by a hereditary monarchy.

That’s made the decision by Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates and Egypt to launch a surprise economic and diplomatic blockade against Qatar this month all the more surprising.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the diplomatic conflict between Qatar and its neighbors over funding of militant Islamic groups, the Al-Jazeera news network and relations with Iran.


AP Photo

Even as the number of executions is set to hit a 25 year-low in the U.S., the use of the death penalty is on the rise globally. One country that is leading the rise is Saudi Arabia, which executed at least 158 people last year. 

Saudi Arabia's growing use of capital punishment has drawn criticism from human rights groups, who argue that the Saudi policy of publicly beheading the condemned is inhumane and that executing people for non-violent crimes such as drug-smuggling or apostasy is unjust. They also criticize Saudi laws that allow for convicted adulterers to be stoned to death. 

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at capital punishment in Saudi Arabia and the international campaign against it. 


Asmaa Waguih

Civil war in Yemen has forced more than 3 million people from their homes and left millions more in need of food and other humanitarian aid.

With the recent failure of UN-backed peace talks, the situation is unlikely to ease.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the crisis in Yemen and Saudi Arabia's controversial airstrikes in the country that have worsened the plight of its desperate people.


European Press Agency

One of the hardest regions of the globe to be lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender is the Arab world. In Saudi Arabia and Yemen, the punishment for the crime of sodomy is death by stoning, and many other countries impose prison sentences.

Also challenging is the fact that the stigma associated with being LGBT is so great, many people feel they can’t come out even to their family or closest friends.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the uncertain lives of LGBT people in Arab nations.


AP

The conflict in Syria gets the headlines, but 2,000 miles south in Yemen a separate civil war has brought an already impoverished country to its knees.

More than 80 percent of the country's population is in need of humanitarian aid - aid many can't get because of the fighting.

As Shia rebels backed by Iran have battled the country's Saudi Arabia-backed Sunni government, al-Qaida and the Islamic State have taken advantage of the chaos to expand their influence.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the humanitarian and political crisis in Yemen and the threat posed by international extremist groups in the country.


AP

The sharp decline in oil prices over the past 18 months is good news for consumers in many countries. But in oil exporting countries in the Mideast it's leading to layoffs, higher taxes and sharp cuts in government services.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the losers from the 70 percent drop in oil prices over the past two years.


Yemen on the Brink

Mar 19, 2015
Hani Mohammed / Associated Press

The small Arabian peninsula nation of Yemen has gone through a lot of turmoil in the past decade. One president was ousted in 2012 during the Arab Spring, in January a second was overthrown by the Houthis, an Iranian-backed militia. Meanwhile al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, perhaps the terror group's most deadly affiliate, has seized the opportunity to expand its presence in Yemen.

What is the future of this country, and what does it mean for the West if it becomes an Iranian ally or descends into Somalia-style chaos?

gavel
Flickr / steakpinball

A former University of Central Missouri student from Saudi Arabia who was accused of paying his roommate to kill a Warrensburg bar owner has left the country nearly three weeks after charges were dismissed.

Ziyad Abid was held without bond for 11 months in connection with the Sept. 1 slaying of Blaine Whitworth. Johnson County prosecutor Lynn Stoppy dropped the charges August 2nd, saying there wasn't enough evidence to prosecute him.

Local writer Keija Parssinen is something of a fixture on Columbia’s literary scene.

Capt. Shannon Collins / Air Force photo

The U.S. government has approved a $30 billion arms deal with Saudi Arabia that the head of a St. Louis area union says was “do or die” for his members.