Science and Technology

Jeanine Anderson / Flickr

This week -- we’re hearing about the Medicaid expansion debate down in West Plains -- the seat of rural Howell County. A study by the Missouri Budget Project shows that Medicaid expansion would have its most dramatic impact in the state’s rural areas.

The charity Meals on Wheels delivers roughly 100 meals a day to the elderly and the disabled throughout Columbia. Inclement weather, like last week’s snowstorm, forces the charity to reorganize its efforts.

stethoscope
Vitualis / Flickr

Proponents of a Medicaid expansion will get their say at the Missouri Capitol — even if they don't get their way.

A House committee is scheduled to hear testimony Monday on a Democratic proposal to expand eligibility for the Medicaid health care program to an estimated 260,000 additional lower-income adults. The plan has the support of Gov. Jay Nixon and is called for by President Barack Obama's health care law.

But the Republican-led Legislature has generally opposed the Medicaid expansion.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

This week, we’ll hear from Harvest Public Media’s Science of the Seed Series.

Women and Children's hospital
Wikipedia

Update Feb. 22 11:16 a.m.: 

The following Boone Health centers will remain closed today: Boone Convenient Care, Moberly, Boone Family Practice, Boone Infectious Disease, Boone Primary Care, Boone Pulmonary Clinic, Moberly Specialty Clinic and the Wound Clinic. Staying open for Boone Health is Boone Convenient Care Columbia, Boone Internal Medicine Associates, Centralia Family Health Clinic, Southern Boone County Family Care Clinic and Boone Hospital Home Care & Hospice.

Feb. 22 9:40 a.m.:

MU Health Care clinics are closed until Monday, Feb. 25. MU Health Care hospitals and emergency rooms remain open.

Original post:

In response to the winter storm, MU healthcare system officials activated the system’s command center to mobilize staff at 11:45 a.m. this morning.

Is high-speed Internet the way to attract more people to live in rural Missouri? One MU professor seems to think so. First – let’s dial back a little bit. In a story that KBIA aired on Feb. 13, our reporter Lukas Udstuen investigated the story of Goss, a rural town in Monroe County, Missouri. Its population? Zero.

Blunt addresses sequestration during MU science visit

Feb 20, 2013
Olga Khrustaleva / KBIA

Senator Roy Blunt spoke about the importance of research and his views on sequestration during a visit to the MU campus on Tuesday.

55 children are currently waiting for a Big Brother or Big Sister in Jefferson City.

Boone hospital to build new cancer center

Feb 18, 2013

The Boone Hospital Center will begin construction on its new cancer center this year.

File / KBIA

The University of Missouri has started a research center on disaster and terrorism in hopes of boosting training for mental health workers.

Assistant communications professor J. Brian Houston recently received a $2.4 million federal grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. He wants to study the long-term emotional turmoil faced by disaster and terror victims.

The center will employ a university social worker to train school teachers and counselors in Joplin, Kansas City, St. Louis and New Orleans in crisis intervention.

Flickr / San Jose Library

The Missouri General Assembly now has an oral health caucus. Co-chaired by Reps. Donna Lichtenegger (R-Jackson) and Jeanne Kirkton (D-Webster Groves), the caucus held its first meeting Monday, Feb. 11. A big item on the caucus' agenda? Reinstating the position of dental director in the state's health department. 

Exposure to some plastics could affect libido

Feb 13, 2013
Alex E. Proimos / FLICKR

A human’s prenatal exposure to certain plastics might affect later reproductive behaviors. University of Missouri Associate Professor Cheryl Rosenfeld said her experiments on monogamous mice find that exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) hinders their likelihood to reproduce. Rosenfeld said she believes these alterations may take place in humans as well and preventative action is necessary.

MU biofuel researcher wins Innovation Award

Feb 11, 2013

The National Biodiesel Board honored MU Professor Leon Schumacher for his research on using plant materials as replacement for conventional fuel. Schumacher received the Innovation Award at the National Biodiesel Conference and Expo in Las Vegas.

pills
images_of_money / flickr

Missouri mental health officials are hoping a possible state bonding package could permit construction of a new facility at the Fulton State Hospital.

The hospital is Missouri's only maximum- and intermediate-security psychiatric hospital and is the oldest public mental health facility west of the Mississippi River. The Department of Mental Health is proposing a new 300-bed, high-security facility that would cost about $211 million.

Missouri conservation officials are urging people to be cautious around skunks that soon will be emerging from winter shelters.

Skunks are one of the two primary carriers of the rabies virus in Missouri. Encounters increase during skunks' mating season, which starts in late February and continues through March. Males can travel five miles in one night.

Earthquake drill shakes things up

Feb 8, 2013

This morning, residents of Missouri, Illinois, and seven other Central U.S. states participated in an earthquake preparedness drill.

The annual event is known as the Great Central U.S. ShakeOut. This year, close to three million people registered to participate.

HIV/AIDS testing offered on MU's campus

Feb 7, 2013
Rachel Gleason / KBIA

Free HIV/AIDS testing was offered Thursday at MU’s Student Center, as a consortium of campus organizations came together to raise awareness of the epidemic to black communities. The MU Black Men’s Initiative, also known as MBMI, sponsored the 3rd annual National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day on Thursday. MBMI Coordinator Marcus Mayes says it’s important to address the stigma that comes with being tested.

Koen Vereeken / Flickr

While students at Central Missouri University browsed the internet and checked their email, their computers were slowly working toward a world record.  

Syndicate Mizzou / Syndicate Mizzou

  MU nursing professor Tina Bloom interviewed 24 pregnant rural Missouri women to learn about what makes them stress. She said what she found challenges her idyllic vision of rural life.

pills
acephotos1 / dreamstime

Efforts to establish a prescription drug monitoring program in Missouri are making a comeback this year. But there’s a twist: the main opponent of establishing such a program is now sponsoring legislation.

“I think it’s a severe intrusion of our liberty to have the government create a database that is accessible by thousands of people, if not tens of thousands of people, who would then have access to sensitive private information,” said Republican Senator Rob Schaaf, a physician in St. Joseph, Mo.

Autism awareness ribbon
beverly&pack / Flickr

A new report shows that health insurance payments for autism-related treatments in Missouri rose by more than 50 percent last year.

The state insurance department says more than 2,500 people received treatment covered by insurance for autism spectrum disorders in 2012. Insurance claims for the services increased to $6.6 million from $4.3 million the previous year.

A Missouri law that took effect in January 2011 requires health insurance companies to cover certain autism treatments.

Missouri River
KBIA

Some Midwestern rivers that were near record lows are on the verge of flooding after storms dumped up to 3 inches of rain, giving a boost to drought-ravaged waterways.

Missouri Secretary of State

 A new report by an MU policy analyst warns about the consequences of a ballot measure passed by Missouri voters last November.

Pediatric Ambulance
MU Healthcare

A federal Medicare regulator has dropped its inquiry into deficiencies at the University of Missouri Health System after the university pledged to make changes.

Another Missouri town is going smoke-free.

The city council in Washington, Mo., voted last week to prohibit indoor smoking at restaurants, bars, businesses and other public places.

The Washington Missourian reports the law is effective April 15. Joette Reidy of Breathe Easy Washington presented petitions signed by 1,800 residents in support of the measure.

Twenty-nine cities and towns in Missouri prohibit smoking in public places.

Lance Cheung / USDA

This week, we'll hear how some winter wheat farmers are faring in the new year, and talk to a researcher that helped set a new ballooning record in Antarctica.

Washington University

Scientists set a new ballooning record Wednesday in Antarctica. The two-ton Super TIGER balloon has now been afloat for over 45 days, breaking the previous record on the frozen continent. The balloon carries equipment that collects data about cosmic rays from deep in the universe.

Ryan Murphy is a graduate student at Washington University in St. Louis, and he is part of the science team in Antarctica. He spoke with KRCU's Jacob McCleland.

What exactly is Super TIGER and what’s it doing?

The Pew Charitable Trust’s Center on the States recently released a report or oral health that didn’t speak too highly of Missouri. On an A through F scale, it gave the state a D for its efforts to provide access to dental sealants for high-need kids. Dental sealants are plastic coatings put on children’s molars after they first come in that help prevent decay.

Missouri girl undergoes cryopreservation

Jan 22, 2013
venturist.info

Kim Suozzi, a graduate of Truman State University, passed away on January 17.  Upon death, her body was cryopreserved--frozen--and relocated to a cryopreservation facility called the Alcor Life Extension Foundation in Arizona.

Laura Siegler / Harvest Public Media

In Manhattan, Kan., the site of National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility is still just a huge hole in the ground nearly a year after the initial ground-breaking.

But there has been some progress. In December, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, which will operate the huge animal disease lab if it is ever completed, got title to the land when the city of Manhattan officially deeded over the 47-acre site. It’s a move that supporters hope will breathe new life into the beleaguered lab.

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