Science and Technology

Panting, Perspiration, And Puddles

Aug 12, 2017

The Midnight Scan Club

Aug 5, 2017

How fire ants manage to build ‘Eiffel Tower’-like structures using their own bodies

Jul 30, 2017

As a child, you probably watched ants tunneling into cracks in a sidewalk or building elaborate, networked colonies in a toy ant farm. But have you ever seen a tower of fire ants?

The swirling structure is formed when fire ants pile together in a shape resembling an upside-down tornado, or the Eiffel Tower. Ant researcher David Hu estimates that for humans, the equivalents of some ant towers would stretch tens of stories high.

A new way to go local: Buy solar energy from your neighbors

Jul 28, 2017

The green trend these days is to go local — and if urbanites can source everything from veggies to craft beer in their neighborhoods, why not solar energy?

LO3 Energy, a New York-based startup, is working on one way to do so. Its project, Brooklyn Microgrid, aims to help electricity users buy energy from their energy-producing neighbors, using smart meters and an app.

Alan Alda: To Talk Better, Listen

Jul 28, 2017

Particles Behaving Badly

Jul 22, 2017

Can We Pay People To Save The Rainforest?

Jul 22, 2017

Tired of sweating over the stove? Try cooking with science this summer.

Jul 21, 2017

It’s the height of summer, and nothing sounds less appetizing than sweating over the stove to cook a meal. No one would blame you for turning to a diet of ice cream, salad and sandwiches — but with the help of science, you can expand your culinary horizons even further.

As Jeff Potter, author of "Cooking for Geeks: Real Science, Great Cooks, and Good Food," explains, there are plenty of ways to dehydrate, acid bathe and salt preserve your way to a delicious meal, sans oven.

In California, solar power is booming: The state leads the nation in solar production, and for a brief period on March 11, California pulled nearly 40 percent of its electricity from the sun.

Instead of heading to the doctor for a painful flu shot, what if you could someday vaccinate yourself at home — just by applying a patch to your skin?

Researchers at Emory University and the Georgia Institute of Technology are working to make that a reality. They’ve developed a small, bandagelike patch that can dispense a flu vaccine into your skin using a hundred or so microneedles. Its creators described the first human trials recently in The Lancet.

Are We Facing Electrical Gridlock?

Jul 15, 2017

A Peek Into The Sex Lives Of Algae

Jul 15, 2017

Creating The Perfect Ice Cube

Jul 15, 2017

Buzz over the Chukchi Sea in a helicopter in early spring, and there’s little to see but sky and ice. That is, until your eye catches the maze of polar bear tracks threading across the ice in some areas. The sea, which stretches between northwestern Alaska and northeastern Russia, is home to one of the Arctic’s 19 distinct polar bear populations.

Pages