Science and Technology

jungmoon / Flickr

Insect scientists say biotech corn is losing its ability to fend off a major insect pest known as the corn rootworm.  The scientists say continued widespread use of genetically-modified corn will only make the problem worse.

 

Sunday will mark the one-year anniversary of the massive earthquake and tsunami that hit coastal Japan. 

Brad Flickinger / Flickr

On this week’s show, we’ll talk about about exercise programs for minority populations, and hear about tablet technology in classrooms.

Benton Elementary brings iPads into the classroom

Mar 8, 2012
Lee Jian Chung / KBIA

Columbia’s Thomas Benton Elementary School received 50 iPads at the beginning of the school year. The technology’s been used in classes such as Art, Music and P.E. KBIA’s Lee Jian Chung looked at how these tablet computers are being introduced into schools and whether or not it could replace the chalkboard.

The Missouri House has passed legislation creating an electronic database to track prescription drug purchases. But the bill faces opposition in the Senate.

City takes aim at energy efficiency in rental units

Mar 8, 2012
Kelly Sims / Flikr

The City of Columbia wants rental property owners to make their units more energy efficient. The city's first step is to find out just how efficient – or inefficient – those houses and apartments are.

Why 10,000 steps might save your life

Mar 7, 2012
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Everyone knows exercise helps you lose weight, build up muscles, and fit in the swimsuit next summer. But why, exactly, does it lower your risk of diabetes? In this Health & Wealth update, MU researchers look into the relationship between inactivity and spikes in blood sugar that can lead to type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

USACEpublicaffairs / Flickr

The University of Missouri Police Department is offering lessons over the next three months on how to respond to an armed threat.

It may be easier to be sentenced to death in Missouri than in other states, according to a study released today.

Sylvia Maria Gross / Harvest Public Media

On this week's show, we'll explore how some towns are dealing with poor access to affordable food. Plus, an interview with President Obama's principal environmental advisor.

File / KBIA

Some low-income seniors and people with disabilities in Missouri could have to pay more out of pocket to qualify for Medicaid coverage under changes being initiated in the state program.

Discovering a comet

Feb 23, 2012
Kevin Dooley / Flickr

If you go stargazing tonight, you just might see a faint little speck with a Missouri connection.

Elizabeth Trovall / KBIA

Today the University of Missouri System announced the recipients of a $600,000 investment in two university research teams. The money will be use to further commercialize and expand lab research, which could translate into economic growth in Missouri.

The rising interest in eating locally grown food throughout the state has sparked the Missouri Department of Agriculture to begin a local food grants program. In its first year, the program has awarded a grant to the Columbia Center for Urban Agriculture.

File / KBIA

 

An Associated Press survey of the nation's top methamphetamine-producing states shows national lab seizures rose again last year.

The early morning earthquake that rattled much of Southeast Missouri on Tuesday morning caused little damage. The 4.0 magnitude quake was centered near East Prairie, Missouri.

File / KBIA

The Missouri Science and Innovation Reinvestment Act, or MOSIRA, has been ruled unconstitutional by a Cole County judge.

New program eases debt for rural medical students

Feb 22, 2012
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

The average medical school student graduates with close to $160,000 in debt. That heavy burden is one reason why there is a long-running shortage of primary care doctors in rural America. More and more graduating students choose higher-paying specialties over rural primary care. In this weekly update, a new pilot program helps medical students pay off loans as soon as they start residency, so it's easier to choose a lower-paying, but possibly more fulfilling career path.

 

Eight hundred and seventy one high school students suffered concussions during last fall, according to a new survey conducted by the Missouri State High School Activities Association. Unsurprisingly, 75 percent of those concussions happened to football players.  State lawmakers made this survey mandatory last year, so there isn’t any previous data with which to compare it.

New research shows that differences in the brain development of autistic children are already visible in infants as young as six months old.

Daniel Castellano / Flickr

 

On this week’s show, we’ll explore what's in our food, and hear from the director of a documentary that looks at the difficult choices involved with legalized, physician assisted suicide.

Jessica Naudziunas / Harvest Public Media

Pick up your favorite packaged food and read the ingredient list.

If you stumbled over any of the words or a color jumped out at you, you might be looking at what’s known as a food additive.  

Full Frame Documentary Film Festival / Flickr

The film How to Die in Oregon, follows several terminally ill patients as they undertake the difficult decision to end their lives under the state’s controversial Death with Dignity Act.

 Former University of Missouri running back Derrick Washington has pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of domestic assault against an ex-girlfriend.

Bill Bumgarner / flikr

Boone County and the City of Columbia are using a grant from the Environmental Protection Agency to study storm-water runoff into Bear Creek, north of I-70. A task force will focus on reducing pollutants, which flow directly into the creek, untreated.  

Melanie Cheney / Flickr

On February 2, the non-profit organization Missouri River Relief will host the Wild and Scenic film festival at the Blue Note in Columbia. Festival-goers can expect to see a variety of environmental and adventure films. One of those films, Big Muddy Clean Sweep, documents the organization’s trek across the state, cleaning the Missouri River aboard a barge.

Steve Schnarr is the program manager for Missouri River relief. We spoke to him about what it was like traveling across the state, his own connection to the Missouri River and what people could expect at the festival.

On food and phones

Feb 2, 2012
Kris Krüg / Flickr

 

On the show this week, we’ll revisit a report that tests the iPhone 4s’s ability to recognize accents, and hear from author Michael Pollan.

Photo by Ken Light

Michael Pollan considers himself a writer, a professor and eater.  

Recruiting doctors to live and work in rural America is a chronic problem. Most health centers try to attract workers with big salaries and expensive homes.

Shots previously reported that one center in Maine was trying to lure medical students to the countryside for their final two years with the hope that they stick around.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Ever since Mormon prophet and founder Joseph Smith revealed the Book of Mormon in 1830, his followers have struggled for acceptance. If you want to understand the "why" behind this rocky relationship, the rolling farmland of northwest Missouri might be the best place to start -- the birthplace of the human race, according to Joseph Smith, and the place where Christ will first step down in the second coming. 

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