Science and Technology

KBIA file photo

An independent panel says the U.S Army Corps of Engineers did what it could to prevent this year’s record flooding along the Missouri River. But as St. Louis Public Radio’s VERONIQUE LACAPRA reports, changes will be needed to manage increasingly frequent extreme weather events.

Dollars, doctors, and drug companies

Dec 21, 2011
propublica.org

In this week's Health & Wealth update, a story about both health and wealth: drug companies have paid doctors in Missouri close to $19 million over the past few years, according to data compiled by the investigative nonprofit, ProPublica. KBIA's Jessica Pupovac has been looking into the financial relationships between Missouri doctors and drug companies, and I sat down to talk with her about what she's found out.

Watch the show and join the conversation on the Intersection website.

The Missouri Solar Energy Industries Association, or MOSEIA, wants Congress to extend the 1603 Treasury Program.

ozark riverways sign
Jimmy Wayne / Flickr

This week on the show: why aren't the candidates for President talking about agricultural issues? Plus: environmental groups petition the National Park Service to take better care of Missouri rivers.

Telemedicine: Adventures in time and space

Dec 14, 2011
nih.gov

In April 1924, Radio News Magazine ran a splashy futuristic cover story: "The Radio Doctor – Maybe!" Kids sit around a new-fangled doohickey and say "ahhh" for a distant doctor on  a video screen. In this weekly Health & Wealth update, the future is now! Telemedicine is expanding to rural hospitals across the country.

Mark Morgan, University of Missouri

A statewide coalition of environmental groups and advocates has submitted five thousand signed petitions to the National Park Service, urging the agency to do more to protect the Ozark National Scenic Riverways in Missouri. As St. Louis Public Radio's Véronique LaCapra reports, the coalition is pushing for more enforcement and a stronger management plan for the Current and Jacks Fork rivers.

Lydia Mulvany / KBIA

Health is generally poorer in rural Missouri compared to urban areas, yet there is a distinct shortage of primary care physicians in rural Missouri. KBIA’s Jacob Fenston has reported that the shortage is only expected to worsen over the next ten years as the elderly population expands.

This graphic shows some of these inequalities--click through for more detail.  Created by Lydia Mulvany.

Remaking school lunches

Dec 8, 2011
Clay Masters / Harvest Public Media

This week on the show: your child's school lunches aren't likely to get much healthier anytime soon. Plus: why you should still get the flu vaccine.

staxnet / Flickr

The Cole County Sheriff’s Department and Jefferson City Police are working on a heroin awareness campaign.

World AIDS Day marks 30 years

Dec 7, 2011
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

This year marks a grim birthday: it was thirty years ago that the first AIDS victims were officially diagnosed. Though the rate of new HIV infections in the US has stabilized in recent years, the percentage of those in rural areas has been on the rise. In this weekly Health & Wealth update, World AIDS Day.

Growing doctors in rural Missouri

Dec 6, 2011
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

In rural Missouri, there are roughly half as many primary care doctors per person, compared to urban parts of the state.  That's a problem, when you consider that rural residents are also older (about three years, on average) and poorer (about five percent more live in poverty). In this Health & Wealth report, small towns in Missouri are facing the shortage by "growing their own" doctors and nurses, starting as early as middle school.

For 24 years December first has marked a day to remember those with HIV and honor those who battle the virus. World AIDS day is being recognized around the globe today- and also around Columbia.

Sylvia Maria Gross / Harvest Public Media

Rural America is losing its grocery stores. Many parts of the United States, and large swaths of rural Missouri, are now classified as ‘food deserts’, areas where residents lack access to affordable food.

But as Harvest Public Media's Sylvia Maria Gross reports, some small towns are finding creative ways deal with the problem.

Plus: Nancy Sutley is President Obama’s principal environmental advisor and the Chair of the White House Council on Environmental Quality.

Rural post offices hoping for a break

Nov 30, 2011
Austin Fax / KBIA

The US Postal Service is hemorrhaging money – over the past year, it lost more than $5 billion. To staunch the negative cash flow, the postmaster general is looking at closing nearly 3,700 post offices – the vast majority in rural America. In this week's Health & Wealth update, KBIA's Austin Fax checks in to some very small towns where post offices may be on the chopping block.

An accent ‘test-drive’ of the iPhone’s new digital assistant. Plus: at what age do babies start engaging in mind-reading? One MU researcher thinks she’s got it figured out.

ambulance
Creative Commons / Flickr

The University of Missouri Children’s Hospital has inducted two new ambulances into its fleet. The new vehicles also have side-loading doors instead of back doors that allow for two patients to be transported at the same time.

Rural women diagnosed later

Nov 23, 2011
Faustine Williams

Women in rural Missouri are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer at a late stage than women in urban or suburban counties. In this weekly Health & Wealth update, the urban / rural disparity in breast cancer detection. 

Should Medical School Be Free?

Nov 21, 2011
mskcc.org

Heck yeah!! So should lunch. But two researchers say making medical school free could send more young doctors into primary care and rural practice, thus solving one of the big challenges facing health care today. And they've got a way to pay for it too.

Missouri Health Premiums Below National Average

Nov 18, 2011

Missouri families pay close to twenty percent of income on health insurance premiums. If that sounds like a lot, stay away from Mississippi. Families in that state pay the highest percentage of their income toward health insurance: 28 percent. This, according to a new study by the Commonwealth Fund.

pills
Pink Sherbert Photography / Flickr

This week on the show: the University of Missouri sponsors the Suicide Prevention Week. Plus: Missouri is ill-equipped to deal with prescription drug abuse.

It's Rural Health Day!

Nov 17, 2011
celebratepowerofrural.org

To celebrate, experts from non-profits and government agencies are holding a live webinar on some of the challenges and rewards of providing health care to rural America.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Backers compare health insurance exchanges to Travelocity or Expedia. Websites where you can quickly compare prices and features to get the best deal. But detractors oppose them as a federal intrusion into the health care market. In this weekly Health & Wealth update, Missourians debate the merits of Obama's health reform law, as state lawmakers try to decide whether to authorize an exchange.

A report from the National Alliance on Mental Illness, or NAMI, said Missouri will see a slight increase in next year’s funding for mental health treatment and services. Despite this, the report said the state is still in the midst of a mental health crisis.

Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Six months ago, an EF5 tornado plowed through the center of Joplin, leaving about one-fifth of the city's population without a home. Now, people are slowly getting back to normal. For some, normal means lacing up the running shoes and hitting the streets.

When the Diaspora project was first announced, it made huge waves in the tech world. A group of students from New York University were asking for money to create a social network that rivaled Facebook, but without the privacy concerns. They wanted a place where users had full control of their content and they raised more than $200,000 to do it.

Over the weekend, Ilya Zhitomirskiy, one of the founders, died at age 22. The cause of death has not yet been confirmed.

A Family's Fight To Clear The Air

Nov 11, 2011

Every polluted place in America probably has people like the Galemores, who are alarmed by the sicknesses around them, the strange substances falling from the sky, and the industrial facility on the north side of town.

They become environmental activists out of necessity.

"We're not really tree-hugging liberals," says Selene Hummer, 51, who shares a home-decorating business with her mother and drives around with a Sarah Palin 2012 bumper sticker on the rear window of her pickup.

Poisoned Places, Neglected Communities

Nov 11, 2011
NPR

Congress strengthened The Clean Air Act over twenty years ago, but air pollution is still a concern in cities and towns all over America.  NPR's special investigation, Poisoned Places looks at some of the factories and power plants that are polluting the air and poisoning communities.

Senators Get an Earful on Health Reform

Nov 11, 2011
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Missouri state senators listened to over 3 hours of impassioned testimony on health care reform yesterday. The hearing was supposed to be on the rather mundane question of whether Missouri should set up an online health care exchange starting in 2014, or let the federal government do so. But the hearing quickly became a forum for debating the merits of health reform itself. After the jump, two interviews with senators on the committee: a Democrat representing one of the state's most liberal districts, and a Republican who has been at the forefront of Missouri's pushback against "Obamacare."

More than 160 million women were never born as a result of sex-selective abortion. That's more than the entire female population of the United States.

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