Science and Technology

Hosted by Kyle Deas.

Chronic medical conditions are a huge problem for the homeless, unemployed, or uninsured. In an effort to address this problem, a group of University of Missouri medical students founded MedZou, a student staffed and managed medical clinic that provides free medical care to the uninsured. Though the clinic is a little ad-hoc – it sees patients in a donated meeting area a few nights a month – it provides the students with valuable practice and the patients with potentially life-changing care. KBIA’s Jessica Pupovac has this story.

Officials said a change in dispatching procedure in Camden County will cut down emergency response times.

Must Watch Video: Quantum Levitation

Oct 18, 2011

This is coolest thing we've seen in a long time:

The video was posted to YouTube two days ago by the Association of Science-Technology Centers and has already garnered 641,230 views. But what is going on here? It's quantum levitation, dude!

Reporter's Notebook: Running in Joplin

Oct 14, 2011
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

I ran a marathon in Joplin last weekend – the second annual “Mother Road Marathon,” along Route 66. It was hot, there was a head wind, and it was a long slow day. My time was exactly one hour longer than my first marathon six months ago. I didn’t have a good excuse for my slowness – I’ve just been lazy about training. But for locals in Joplin, training for this race was truly challenging. 

Jill Utrup / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

This week on the show, we hear about salamanders, energy-saving techniques, and the strange, secret world of mushroom hunters.

Hosted by Kyle Deas.

The Columbia city hall has received a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design gold certification.
By Daina Schnese (Columbia, Mo.)

Six MU students are challenging themselves to live as sustainably as possible under one roof.

Kelly Gehringer reports:

Lawmaker Seeks New 'Family Consent' Law

Oct 6, 2011
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

End-of-life decisions can be wrenching for families. In the early 2000s, the case of Terri Schiavo riveted the nation, as her family battled over whether to remove her feeding tube or keep her on life support. Now, 44 states have so-called “family consent” laws, which help determine which family member should make health care decisions. Missouri is one of the six states with no such law, putting families and doctors in legal limbo. But a bill headed for the Missouri legislature could change that.

A federal order that would require the relocation or removal of more than 1,000 Lake of the Ozarks homes is causing an uproar among residents and property owners.

By  Jessica Pupovac (Columbia, Mo.)

Rural Hospitals Face Medicare Cuts

Oct 3, 2011
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Two weeks ago, President Obama told the nation, “Washington has to live within its means.” As Democrats and Republicans continue to scour the federal budget for over a trillion dollars in possible cuts, one group very likely to be affected is rural hospitals in the Midwest and across the nation.

Jacob Fenston.

Two weeks ago, President Obama told the nation, “Washington has to live within its means.” As Democrats and Republicans continue to scour the federal budget for over a trillion dollars in possible cuts, one group very likely to be affected is rural hospitals in the Midwest and across the nation.

By Jacob Fenston (Kansas City, Mo.)

This week, we look at a video-game accessory that could prevent injuries among the elderly. Plus, Columbia College is getting a new science building.

Hosted by Kyle Deas.

Boone Hospital Center’s new $5.9 million lab officially opened Tuesday.

By Daina Schnese (Columbia, Mo.)

Insurance Premiums Hit Record High

Sep 27, 2011

Health care premiums are at a record high – up nine percent since last year. A survey released Tuesday shows the average family is now paying over 15 thousand dollars a year on health care premiums. KBIA’s Jacob Fenston reports the rising costs are affecting Missourians as well.

ACLU Targets Camdenton Over LGBT Sites

Sep 26, 2011
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

At public schools across the nation, internet filters keep students from looking at pornography and other material deemed harmful. It’s required under a federal law passed more than a decade ago. But now, one rural school district in central Missouri is at the heart of a national legal battle over whether schools may use this law to block websites that promote gay rights.

Agriculture Secretary on Rural Jobs

Sep 22, 2011
USDA

President Obama has been touring the country trying to sell voters on his American Jobs Act. According to the White House, the bill would, if passed, give the state of Missouri $700 million for transportation projects and cut the taxes of 120,000 Missouri businesses. And agriculture secretary Tom Vilsack says that rural areas in particular would benefit from the jobs bill. Vilsack spoke with KBIA’s Jacob Fenston.

Flickr

This week, we sit down with Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack to discuss the American jobs act. Plus, advancements in ice-cream technology.

Hosted by Kyle Deas.

NOAA, or the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, has been interviewing survivors from May’s deadly tornado in Joplin to find out how it can better save lives in the event of another devastating storm. The agency oversees the National Weather Service, which is in charge of sending out severe weather alerts.

By Jennifer Moore (Springfield, Mo.)

Missouri has a new state veterinarian for the first time in nearly 20 years.

By Tom Martin (Columbia, Mo.)

Health Care Exchanges Spark Clash

Sep 16, 2011

A Missouri Senate committee heard testimony Thursday on the health care exchanges mandated by the Affordable Care Act. The legislature must either create an exchange or let the federal government do so. Republicans on the committee clashed with Governor Jay Nixon’s administration.

Flickr

This week, a food pantry that’s trying to offer healthier food to low-income families. Plus, an MU researcher tells us how quitting smoking may make you a happier person.

Hosted by Kyle Deas.

USDA Commits $14 Million to Rural Jobs

Sep 14, 2011

Agriculture secretary Tom Vilsack announced $14 million in new funding Wednesday to help stimulate rural job growth. Small businesses across the country will get money, including a tiny airport in southern Missouri.

Health Reform Targets Health Literacy

Sep 13, 2011
Jacob Fenston / KBIA

Nearly one million more Americans were without health insurance in 2010, compared with the year before. That’s according to new Census numbers released Tuesday, which also show the Midwest has one of the lowest rates of uninsured in the nation. But even for people who have health insurance, understanding a doctor’s orders can be an obstacle to getting good care.

Most Missourians Still Oppose Health Care Law

Sep 13, 2011

Americans now know less about the main provisions of Obama’s health care reform law than they did at the end of last year. That’s according to the latest monthly poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation. Here in Missouri, a majority continues to oppose the law.

Kathleen Masterson / Harvest Public Media

This week, we hear from a Washington University virologist whose made it his mission to combat bio-terrorism. Plus: robots!

Hosted by Kyle Deas.

This week, we take a look at the tricky link between farm policy and obesity. Plus, the State Veterinarian talks about what his office does – and why it’s important.

Hosted by Kyle Deas.

A special report on the academic gender gap: Or, the difference between how women professors and male professors do in their careers. A collaborative report with Investigative Reporters and Editors, on KBIA’s Exam, hosted by KBIA’s Janet Saidi.

Mitchell's New Universal Atlas.... (Philadelphia: Charles Desilver, 1857) / Courtesy of Dickinson College

There are 1.6 million people living in rural Missouri, and many have a hard time accessing health care. In the 2011 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s healthy county rankings, Hickory County in West Central Missouri is rated one of the worst in the state in terms of mental health. It’s so bad, residents say they experience just over a week’s worth of poor mental health days each month. They are also unhealthier and experience more poverty than the national average.

Missouri is known for its black walnut trees—they’re a precious commodity, and Missouri has more black walnuts than any other state. Now, Missouri is starting to mount a defense against Thousand Cankers Disease.

By Lauren Hasler (Columbia, MO)

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