Science and Technology

Hurricane Harvey And The New Normal

Sep 2, 2017

Sweating is an essential and uniquely human function

Aug 28, 2017

Most furry mammals pant to regulate their body temperature. Other animals, like ectotherms — lizards, amphibians, and insects — have other behaviors that help keep them cool. Humans, however, are in a category of our own.

We are the only mammal that relies on secreting water onto the surface of our skin to stay cool: We call it sweating. But how did we develop this ability? When did we ditch the fur of our primate ancestors in favor of sweaty skin?

Don’t Throw Away Those Eclipse Glasses!

Aug 26, 2017

Your Teenager’s Brain Isn’t Deficient

Aug 26, 2017

The threat of an asteroid hurtling towards Earth may be the stuff sci-fi thrillers are made of, but it’s also a real-life concern. In 2013, for instance, a roughly 20-meter-wide meteor exploded over Russia, injuring about 1,500 people with its shock wave.

Why we still remember a ‘relatively’ important eclipse nearly a century later

Aug 17, 2017

Millions of onlookers may find themselves pausing in awe of the cosmos on Aug. 21, as a total solar eclipse darkens swaths of North America. (And at PRI, we want your eclipse plans, stories and photos.)

Probing Humanity’s Endless ‘Why?’

Aug 12, 2017

Panting, Perspiration, And Puddles

Aug 12, 2017

The Midnight Scan Club

Aug 5, 2017

How fire ants manage to build ‘Eiffel Tower’-like structures using their own bodies

Jul 30, 2017

As a child, you probably watched ants tunneling into cracks in a sidewalk or building elaborate, networked colonies in a toy ant farm. But have you ever seen a tower of fire ants?

The swirling structure is formed when fire ants pile together in a shape resembling an upside-down tornado, or the Eiffel Tower. Ant researcher David Hu estimates that for humans, the equivalents of some ant towers would stretch tens of stories high.

A new way to go local: Buy solar energy from your neighbors

Jul 28, 2017

The green trend these days is to go local — and if urbanites can source everything from veggies to craft beer in their neighborhoods, why not solar energy?

LO3 Energy, a New York-based startup, is working on one way to do so. Its project, Brooklyn Microgrid, aims to help electricity users buy energy from their energy-producing neighbors, using smart meters and an app.

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