senate appropriations committee

Mo. senators holding hearing on driver's licenses

Apr 18, 2013
Missouri Capitol
File Photo / KBIA

A Missouri Senate panel has scheduled four public hearings on new procedures for people seeking driver's licenses and concealed gun identification cards.

The Senate Appropriations Committee plans to hold hearings Friday in Springfield and Saturday in Kansas City. Additional hearings are scheduled for April 26 in Cape Girardeau and April 27 in O'Fallon.

Committee Chairman Kurt Schaefer says he wants to hear from the public before lawmakers decide on the budgets for the departments of Revenue and Public Safety.

File / KBIA

Missouri schools could receive a 2 percent funding increase next year and state employees could get a small raise.

david_shane / flickr

A Missouri Senate panel is preparing to begin drafting its plan for the roughly $25 billion state operating budget.

The Senate Appropriations Committee has scheduled hearings throughout the week to begin work on the budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1. The panel is also scheduled to consider the budget for the state Revenue Department, despite recent tensions between the department and Republican senators over new driver's license procedures.

A Republican-led Missouri Senate committee has defeated a plan to expand Medicaid under President Barack Obama's health care law.

The Senate Appropriations Committee rejected the legislation on a party-line vote Wednesday, just minutes after hearing testimony from more than two dozen witnesses in favor of the plan.

A Republican-led House committee defeated a similar bill last month in the same fashion.

selbstfotografiert / Wikimedia Common

A Missouri Senate committee is set to review the state's numerous tax credit programs and their impact on the state budget.

The Senate Appropriations Committee scheduled a hearing Monday on tax credits before it takes up Gov. Jay Nixon's proposed budget for the 2014 fiscal year.

The 61 tax credit programs currently offered by Missouri cost the state nearly $630 million in the latest fiscal year. Last week, the Senate approved another one, with an estimated yearly cost of $3 million, to attract amateur sporting events to the state.