Shakir Hamoodi

Hamoodi Family / HelpHamoodi.org

The Columbia businessman sentenced to three years in prison for violating U.S. sanctions will serve the remainder of his sentence under house arrest.

Did you catch Glenn Greenwald when he was in town last week? The celebrated political journalist stopped by the University of Missouri on a speaking tour. While he was in Columbia it looks like he picked up on the case of Dr. Shakir Hamoodi, an Iraqi-American nuclear engineer who just began a three-year prison sentence at the Fort Leavenworth, Kansas penitentiary for sending money to his family in Iraq at a time when sanctions made that illegal.

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Hamoodi Family / HelpHamoodi.org

It’s been less than one week since Shakir Hamoodi – a Columbia businessman – had to leave his community and start his 3-year prison sentence. 

Hamoodi Family / HelpHamoodi.org

Columbia Businessman Shakir Hamoodi is expected to begin a 3 year federal prison sentence Tuesday afternoon.

Shakir’s son Husam was working at World Harvest Market in Columbia Monday afternoon – Shakir’s last day before he began his prison sentence.

Husam said around 50 people had stopped by the store throughout the day to say goodbye to Shakir.

He also said Shakir has been very busy these past few days. He compared his father’s prison sentence to it being like someone saying ‘you have three months to live.’

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Lukas Udstuen / KBIA

More than 100 people crowded into Columbia's Rock Bridge Christian Church last night to celebrate and say goodbye to Columbia businessman Shakir Hamoodi. Next week, Hamoodi is expected to begin a three year federal prison sentence. He earlier pled guilty to sending about $200,000 to family, friends and charities in his native Iraq from 1991 to 2003. Many of the speakers at the event echoed a similar theme: A conflict between what is legal and what is just. Investigators found no evidence that Hamoodi was aiding the Iraqi government through the financial contributions.

A Columbia grocer convicted of violating federal sanctions against Iraq by sending money overseas is preparing to start a three-year prison sentence later this month.

walknboston / Flickr

Supporters of a Columbia man sentenced to three years in prison for sending money to Iraq despite federal sanctions are organizing an effort to commute his federal sentence.

Newscast for May 18, 2012

May 18, 2012

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  • Columbia business owner sentenced for Iraq donations

A Columbia business owner has been sentenced to three years in federal prison for sending money to Iraq for more than a decade.