south africa

European Press Agency

Two figures have dominated the politics of southern Africa in recent years. One is Zimbabwe’s 93-year-old President Robert Mugabe. The other is South Africa’s 75-year-old President Jacob Zuma.

Now Mugabe is in military custody after an apparent coup d’etat brought an end to his 37-year rule. Meanwhile Zuma is set to be replaced as the leader of the ruling African National Congress next month, and may be forced to step down from his eight-year-old presidency before the end of his term in 2019. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at southern Africa in transition.


AP Photo

Might your children or grandchildren someday live in a world without rhinoceroses or African elephants?

The chances of that are probably higher than you might guess.

There are just 350,000 elephants remaining on African savannas, one-tenth the number in 1900. And the population is estimated to be shrinking by 27,000 a year. The black rhino population has declined 93 percent since 1970.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the trade in elephant tusks and rhino horns that fuels the poaching industry that continues to decimate these endangered species. 


AP Photo

Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe recently turned 93, making him the oldest non-royal head of state in the world.

But in his 37 years in power, he's become a caricature of the corrupt African dictator. Once one of the continent's wealthiest countries, Zimbabwe's economy has halved since 2000. He's sent armed militias to beat and kill political opponents and in 2015 threw a $1 million birthday party for himself, feeding his 20,000 guests dishes like baby elephant even as many of his countrymen live in extreme poverty.

But as Mugabe pushes deeper into his nineties, there are growing questions about his hold on power. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the twilight of the Robert Mugabe era in Zimbabwe and what may come after him.


AP Photo

Might your children or grandchildren someday live in a world without rhinoceroses or African elephants?

The chances of that are probably higher than you might guess.

There are just 350,000 elephants remaining on African savannas, one-tenth the number in 1900. And the population is estimated to be shrinking by 27,000 a year. The black rhino population has declined 93 percent since 1970.

On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the trade in elephant tusks and rhino horns that fuels the poaching industry that continues to decimate these endangered species.


Travis McMillen/RJI

    

Journalists in Turkey and South Africa both work in countries with lively and well-established media. But in both countries, long-running single-party rule has led to challenges for reporters.

On this special edition of Global Journalist, guest host Joshua Kranzberg talks about these issues and more with journalists from the two countries visiting the U.S. on fellowships from the Alfred Friendly Press Partners.  

Students, faculty and members of the MU community gathered Tuesday for a panel discussion about the university’s role in working to end apartheid in South Africa. In the 1980s, students successfully pushed the MU board of curators to divest from American companies doing business in South Africa.

Kathryn Benson, who was heavily involved in the 1980s movement, said protestors built and occupied shantytowns on Francis Quadrangle after traditional protests failed. Benson said students took turns occupying the shanties from October 1986 through February of 1987.

Randy Smith and Team of Students

 

It’s been 20 years since the fall of apartheid in South Africa in 1994. For the last year now, students and faculty here at the University of Missouri have been assisting the University of Western Cape in preserving an archive of thousands of photographs, films, artifacts, oral histories and other historical documents related to the struggle for freedom during apartheid. 

 

Photo courtesy of the Umuzi Photo Club

In poor areas of South Africa, trainers from a small organization called the Umuzi Photo Club give disposable cameras to high school students and teach them basic photography.